West Sea Company

22. Barometers:

Prices in U.S. Dollars are listed in GREEN.




9.35/22.60  NAUTICAL THEME WALL COMPENDIUM.   Genuine 19th century English wall clock and barometer set.  This handsome display features a clock with early-type cylinder escapement running blued steel Breguet-type hands over a white enamel dial with Roman numerals.  The 8-day mechanism is wound and set on the reverse protected by a hammered brass cover.  The barometer function consists of an open face aneroid barometer with white dial marked in atmospheric pressure with an amazing range of 25.5 to 31.5 inches, calibrated in hundredths.  It is marked “ANEROID BAROMETER” at the bottom and bears the standard weather indications of “STORMY, RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR and VERY DRY.”   It has a fine blued steel indicator needle and a brass set need attached to a knurled knob.  Both instruments have brass bezels with beveled glass crystals.  Of great significance and value is the fact that this set is beautifully-carved of oak in the form of an old fashioned kedge anchor with rope-carved inserts.  The stock of the anchor bears a triangular shield in relief and the bottom a decoratively-carved “nut.”  Adding even greater value is the branded English maker’s mark on the back.  This Victorian symbol indicates the precise day, month and year of manufacture:   June 18, 1873!  The display measures 21 ¼ inches tall by 10 inches wide on the flukes of the anchor and protrudes 2 ¼ inches from the wall.  It retains its stout brass hanging bracket on the top.  Both functions, the clock and barometer, are working.  Outstanding condition overall.  Complete with period winding and set key.  WAS $1995  NOW! 1195  Special Packaging


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22.58  ESPECIALLY NICE BAROMETER.  Early 1900’s German aneroid barometer made for the American market signed “The Standard Weather Bureau Service Co., Inc.” as marked on the dial.  The bottom reads “Made In Germany” (pre-War).  This particularly handsome barometer has an open face showcasing the complicated movement within.  The dial is of porcelain colorfully marked with the standard weather notations in fancy script “Stormy, RAIN, Change, FAIR and Very Dry.”  The atmospheric pressure is calibrated in inches of mercury from 27.5 to 31.5 in 2/100th increments marked by tenths.   A delicate blued steel indicator needle points to the current reading overlaid by a brass set needle with knurled knob which records the previous reading.  The dial is protected by its very thick beveled glass crystal set within a brass reflector ring.  The case of the barometer is solid bronze.  A significant aspect of this barometer’s extra appeal is the fact that it can be displayed in 2 ways.  There is a pivoting suspension loop at the top for hanging.  OR, it can be displayed on a desk or shelf supported on its 2 attached feet.  The dial is 5 inches in diameter.  The barometer body is 5 3/8 inches wide by 2 inches deep and stands 6 inches tall inclusive of the loop.  Excellent original condition throughout.  The barometer function is lively and accurate. This is a winner!  549


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22.55  SAILING SHIP BAROMETER.  Noticeably scarce, genuine 19th century ship’s barometer housed in its protective wooden cabinet.  This unusual presentation consists of an aneroid (without liquid) weather barometer in its brass case with white enameled dial under glass.  Its wide scale is calibrated in inches of mercury from 24 to 31 divided in 2/100th increments.  It bears the standard weather indications reading “STORMY, Much Rain, Rain, CHANGE, Fair, Set Fair and VERY DRY.”  The reading is pointed by a fine blued steel indicator needle overlaid by a brass set needle with knurled knob, rove through the beveled glass to track changes.  The bottom of the dial is marked “HOLOSTERIC BAROMETER” and bears the circular trademark “PNHB,” that of the most famous and prolific French barometer maker Paul Naudet, Paris.  The back of the brass case is similarly marked.  The case has a suspension loop at the top which engages a small hook on the inside of the cabinet.  The unique wooden cabinet is beautifully hand-made of solid teak  with decorative parquetry sections.  This is NOT a production item, but was most certainly made on board the ship by its skilled carpenter!  It has a old wooden door inset with wavy glass, hinged on the right, opening on the left, secured with a brass hook and eye.  The top of the case has a thickt brass hanging bracket.  The barometer itself measures 5 inches in diameter.  The cabinet is 7 ¾ inches wide by 8 ½ inches tall and 5 inches deep.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.  The barometer is functional and accurate.  Without a doubt this is the most unusual ship’s barometric item we have encountered in our 40 + years.  895

Why a sailing ship barometer?  Steamships of the late 1800’s into the early 1900's had enclosed pilot houses and chart rooms protected from the harsh environment of the open sea.  On the otherhand, wooden sailing ships were far more exposed to the damp, wind and extremes of temperature – all of which adversely affected the accuracy of a barometer.  This marvelous custom-made cabinet was truly a bit of genius.  It is rare, both in its uniqueness and its survival!  Any knowledgeable maritime collector adds a feather in his/her cap with this acquisition.  A true museum piece at a very, very resonable price in these infrlationary times! Go buy gas!


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22.57  BOSTON BAROMETER.  Outstanding late 1800’s ship’s aneroid barometer made y the prestigious Paris firm of Paul Naudet for the early ship chandlers Advance Nautical Equipment Co. as marked on the dial.  In full, the inscription reads “ADVANCE NAUTICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 154 STATE STREET BOSTON MADE IN FRANCE, HOLOSTERIC BAROMETER, Naudet (PNHB) & Cie.”  The perfect white enameled dial indicates the atmospheric pressure in inches of mercury from 24 to 31 inches in 2/100th increments.  It is marked “STORMY, RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR and VERY DRY.”  The reading is pointed by a  blued steel indicator needle, atop which is the brass set needle with knurled knob rove through the beveled glass crystal.  The barometer case is rich bronze in its original finish.  The back is additionally marked (PNHB) along with a small aperture for setting the barometer movement.  A pivoting suspension loop is provided at the top for hanging.  This instrument is in an outstanding state of original preservation, belying its 140+ year age.  The barometer function is guaranteed to be  lively and accurate.  A scarce example of an early Boston ship chandler item.  495

The Advance Nautical Instrument Company’s address was just a few doors down from the very famous 19th century Boston instrument making firm of Samuel Thaxter and Son who were located at 125 State Street since 1826.

The innovative and prolific Paris aneroid barometer maker, Pierre (alternatively "Paul”) Naudet began his firm in 1861 and continued producing aneroid barometers into the 1930's.  The date and meaning of the markings HBPN (alternatively PNHB) is not thoroughly understood.  Andy Demeter, in his book “Chelsea Clock Company The First One Hundred Years “ notes, "With the possible exception of recording barometers, Chelsea did not assemble holosteric or aneroid movements for their barometers preferring to purchase them from the legendary French maker, Pierre (alternatively Paul) Naudet.  His firm's trademark is typically found in a circle on these early barometer dials with the letters "HBPN" as an abbreviation for "Holosteric Barometer, Pierre Naudet."   A barometer dial on page 220 is pictured with the caption, "1909 Pierre Naudet barometer."

(See Item 22.56)

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22.56  BOSTON BAROMETER with THERMOMETER.  Exquisite ship’s barometer and thermometer made by the Parisian barometer maker Paul Naudet for the highly regarded Boston opticians “PINKHAM & SMITH COMPANY IMPORTERS BOSTON” as boldly marked on the center of the dial.  This particularly pristine example of a late Victorian barometer has a lovely silvered brass dial reading in inches of mercury atmospheric pressure from 27.8 to 31.2 in 2/100ths increments.  The standard weather indications “STORMY, RAIN CHANGE FAIR, VERY DRY” are indicated.  Above the center arbor it reads “HOLOSTERIC (PNHB) Made In France BAROMETER.”  Of special added value is the large, curved mercury thermometer at the bottom of the dial marked “FAHRENHEIT THERMOMETER.”  It is calibrated in 2 degree increments from 22 to 120.  The instrument measures 5 inches in diameter and 2 inches thick.  It stands 5 7/8 inches tall inclusive of the hanging loop.  Outstanding original condition is all respects.  The barometer and thermometer functions are amazingly responsive and accurate.  595

(See item 22.57)

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22.54  HYGROMETER/THERMOMETER.   Highest quality West German hygrometer with an applied alcohol-in-glass thermometer.  The hygrometer registers percent of atmospheric humidity from 0 to 100, indicated by a precise arrowhead needle.  The curved thermometer mounted on milkglass indicates the ambient temperature in degrees Fahrenheit from -26 to 122 in 2 degree increments marked by 20's.  The all brass case is in a lustrous finish.  Three mounting holes are on the flanged back which measures 6 inches in diameter.  The silver dial is 4 ½ inches across.  Excellent functional condition.  WAS $295  NOW! 99


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22.50  GREAT LAKES BAROMETER.  Very scarce and highly sought after ship's barometer with a Great Lakes provenance.  This handsome aneroid barometer is signed on the silvered brass dial "GEO B. CARPENTER & Co., CHICAGO," the famous Mid-West marine hardware maker and ships' chandler.  It features the very finest quality aneroid movement made by the renowned Paris maker Pierre Naudet (alternatively "Paul") whose instruments were purchased by the U.S. Navy and the very prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston.  The dial is calibrated in inches of mercury atmospheric pressure from 24 ½ to 31 ½ in 2/100ths increments marked by 10's.  Whole inches from 25 to 31 are indicated.  It bears the standard weather indications "STORMY, RAIN CHANGE, FAIR, VERY DRY."  The open face dial reveals the highly complex mechanism within.  The barometric reading is deliniated by the blued steel arrow indicator.  It is overlaid bay the brass set needle rove through the beveled glass crystal attached to the brass set knob.  This superb scientific instrument is housed in a turned solid bronze case with a pivoting suspension bracket and ring near the rear for hanging.  The back of the barometer has a small orifice for adjusting the reading.  In the center it is stamped with the maker's mark "PNHB."  5 ¼ inches in dimamter aind 2 1/28 inches thick.  The overall height with hanger is 6 ¼ inches.   Outstaninding original condition in all respects.  Lively and very accurate. This barometer is in exceptionally-well preserved condition after 100 years. Great Lakes and Inland Waterways  relics of all types are earnestly sought after by collectors.  This won't last long!  495

George B. Carpenter joined the already established company of Gilbert Hubbard & Co. (founded 1840) in 1857.  The ensuing 2 decades saw Carpenter deeply involved in expanding the business from simply manufacturing rope, twine and burlap to include hardware and railroad supplies.  Mr. Hubbard died in 1881 and the company became George B. Carpenter & Co.  The business flourished into the early 1900's.  The elder Carpenter died in 1912 and his son, Benjamin, took over the company, which continued to supply high quality marine lighting and hardware beyond World War I.


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22.47  RARE WEST COAST BAROMETER.  Very finest quality aneroid barometer with the silvered brass dial signed "LOUIS WEULE Co. SAN FRANCISCO."  The near perfect open face dial is marked in inches of atmospheric pressure from 25 to 32 in 2/100th increments marked by tens and in whole inches.  It bears the classic bold weather indications "STORMY RAIN CHANGE FAIR and VERY DRY."  At the bottom of the dial it is marked "Holosteric (PNHB) Barometer."  The barometer reading is shown by the delicate blued steel indicator needle.  The dial is protected by a beveled glass crystal with brass set needle rove through the glass, connected to a fine knurled brass knob.  The beautiful, complex inner workings of the movement appear through the large central aperture.  The solid bronze case is in excellent original condition with a mellow patina acquired over the last 100 years.  The back is stamped (PNHB).  At the top is a substantial pivoting suspension loop for hanging.  5 ¼ inches in diameter by 2 inches thick.  6 ¼ inches tall overall, inclusive of the suspension loop.  Still functioning perfectly and very accurate.  As clean and as original as they come!  495

Heinrich Emil Ludwig "Louis" Weule was born in Germany in 1841 and immigrated to America during the time of the Civil War.  Trained as a machinist in the old country he began his career working for other scientific instrument makers in and around San Francisco.  In 1892 Weule was able to purchase the business of Charles Pace of London.  The firm, which dealt in nautical charts, instruments and supplies, was founded by Pace in 1862.  After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire, Weule reorganized the company under the name Louis Weule Company.   For over 3 decades the firm was the most prominent ships' chandler and maker of scientific instruments on the west coast.  Weule died in 1927

The first practical aneroid ("without liquid") barometer is generally attributed to Parisian, Lucien Vidie in 1843, who was awarded an English patent for his device in 1844.  Vidie's patent rights expired in 1859, allowing other makers to produce instruments.  The most successful makers in France were Naudet, Hulot & Cie, who reportedly made 20,000 instruments between 1861 and 1866.  1

Another reference to the firm was made by Middleton who states, "...there were several makers soon after the patent expired in 1859, the most successful being Naudet, Hulot, & Cie.  According to Le Roux they made 20,000 aneroid barometers between 1861 and 1866.  They called them baromètres holostériques...  references occur in the continental literature to Naudet barometers and to holostric barometers for the rest of the nineteenth century.  They acquired a great reputation and were widely imitated." 2  Middleton goes on to state,  "For many purposes aneroids continued to be made - and are indeed still made - of a form very like that arrived at by Naudet, Hulot & Cie about 1860." 3   In the Appendix is an entry for a barometer held in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.  It reads, "230,002  A "Holosteric  Barometer- Compensated, "made by Naudet & Co. Marked on the back of the case, U.S. Signal Service" 4 indicating manufacture around the time of the First World War.

Surprisingly, little is written about the innovative and prolific Paris aneroid barometer maker, Pierre (alternatively "Paul) Naudet, although it is known that his firm was begun in 1861 and  continued producing aneroid barometers into the 1930's.  The dating and meaning of the markings HBPN (alternatively PNHB) are less clear.  An entry for a barometer sold on eBay indicates the markings refer to "Hulot, Pertius & Naudet, Paris, barometer makers in the 1930's.  However Andy Demeter, writing about the history of the Chelsea Clock Company notes, "With the possible exception of recording barometers, Chelsea did not assemble holosteric or aneroid movements for their barometers preferring to purchase them from the legendary French maker, Pierre (alternatively Paul) Naudet.  His firm's trademark is typically found in a circle on these early barometer dials with the letters "HBPN" as an abbreviation for "Holosteric Barometer, Pierre Naudet." 5  On page 220 a barometer dial is pictured with the caption, "1909 Pierre Naudet barometer."

1. Edwin Banfield, "Barometers Aneroid and Barographs," 1985, Baros Books, Wiltshire, England, p. 21.

2. W.E. Knowles Middleton, "The History of the Barometer," 1964, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, p. 407.

3. Ibid. p. 409.


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22.44  CASED ALTIMETER/BAROMETER.  Extra large cased turn-of-the-century gentleman's pocket altimeter and barometer.  This English-made piece is signed in script with the retailer's name "Adolf Frese, Los Angeles."  This impressive precision instrument is of the very highest quality, featuring an aneroid barometer movement connected to a very fine indicator needle.  The lovely silvered brass dial is calibrated in atmospheric pressure in inches of mercury from an amazing 20.08 to 31 in 5/100th increments marked by whole inches.  Encircling this readout is the altimeter scale which reads from 0 to 10,000 calibrated in 50 foot increments.  The precision of the delicate needle is such that an extrapolated reading with a finer accuracy can be observed.  The dial is also marked "Compensated" which means it is corrected for temperature changes.  The beveled glass crystal protects the dial and is seated in the rotating knurled bezel which indicates the altitude at any given reading.  The heavy, solid brass case is in its original gilt brass finish.  This barometer is equipped with a folding suspension loop at the top and an adjustment feature on the back for setting the accuracy of the reading.  It fits neatly into its wooden case covered in rich Moroccan leather, lined in silk and satin.  The case hinges on the left and closes on the right with a spring-load button latch.  This represents the largest of its type of "pocket barometer" ever made.  It measures 2 7/8 inches in diameter and 7/8 inches thick.  Rare to find in such good overall condition.  695


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22.43  WALL BAROMETER.  Exquisite mid 19th century wall barometer of French manufacture.  This lovely mercury tube barometer has a rosewood case with porcelain register and thermometer dials.  The barometric dial is marked in centimeters of mercury atmospheric pressure from 73 to 79 cent8imeters calibrated by 10th and marked by 10's from 73 to 79.  The bottom of the porcelain dial is signed "LEGRIS Hauvre."   The inlaid thermometer above with a large red alcohol bulb and a porcelain scale is marked "Thermometer" at the top.  Confirming its age, the scale is calibrated in degrees Reaumur and Centigrade on either side of the bulb.  It registers from -30 degrees Centigrade to +60 with numerous temperature indications in French.   The movement of this wall barometer contains what is known as a "J Tube," filled with mercury  which supports a floating bob.  It is linked to an incredibly fine rack and pinion movement which operates the indicator needle.  This arrangement is found in only the highest quality stick barometers.  Most are fitted with a simple pulley and string arrangement.  The lovely porcelain dial is calibrated in mercurical centimeters of atmospheric pressure from 72 ½ to 79 ½ or the equivalent of 28 ½ to 31.3 inches.  It bears weather indications "TEMPETE, VARIABLE, and TRES SEC" among others.  The center is adorned with a "snowflake" design overlaid by the ornate gold set needle and the simple black indicator with arrow tip.  The set needle is operated by a detailed cast brass "acorn" knob at the very bottom of the barometer body.  The unglazed face is seated in a very ornate gilded bezel measuring 7 ¼ inches in diameter.  The barometer body is beautiful, rich rosewood with a very delicate string inlay border on all edges.  37 inches tall by 7 ¾ inches wide.  The original hanging bracket is at the top.   The overall condition is absolutely exquisite in all respects.  Both the thermometer and thermometer functions operate well and are very accurate.  1195 Special Packaging

Because this item contains mercury, shipping may be a problem.  Please consult with us and we will see what we can do.


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22.40   BAROGRAPH.  Superb quality, third quarter 19th century British recording barometer by one of the most famous makers of the era, “LENNIE EDINBURGH” as engraved on the bedplate.  This precision scientific instrument is as lovely as it is accurate.  The complex solid brass mechanism is gold washed.  It consists of a stack of 8 flexible aneroid bellows attached to a linkage which transfers motion to an inking stylus at the end of a long metal trace.   The bellows expand and contract with changes in atmospheric pressure, the extent of which are measured on the revolving clockwork drum.  To set the reading a knurled thumbscrew is at the top of the cross bar of the support columns.  A long arm attached to a knurled knob on the bedplate allows the trace to be disconnected from the drum when not in use.  The drum is encompassed by an interchangeable paper chart calibrated in barometric inches of mercury from 28 to 31 in 5/100th increments on the a axis.  The x axis is calibrated in days of the week divided by 2 hour intervals.   The bottom of the chart is signed “LENNINE 40 PRINCESS STREET EDINB.”  Inside the drum a  jeweled clockwork with built-in winding key revolves the drum precisely once a week to produce a continuous and accurate record of atmospheric changes.   These observations were important for the British Meteorological Office (the “Met” formed in 1854) to help forecast weather at sea for the safety of seamen.  To these ends a large number of blank and actual inked charts are contained in a drawer below.  The mechanism is housed in a handsome splined solid mahogany case with thick beveled glass on all 5 sides.  An articulated brass arm allows the case to be opened and held in place while servicing.  A small bottle of special red recording ink is held in its receptacle.  The entire unit measures 14 ½ inches long by 9 inches wide and 8 3/8 inches tall.  Outstanding original condition.  The clockwork has just been fully serviced by a professional watchmaker.  1495

Eliza Lennie, widow of James Lennie, worked as an optical instrument maker at 40 Princess Street, Edinburgh, Scotland from 1857-1901.  Her husband, James Lennie, began the firm as an optical instrument maker in 1840 until his death, at which time his wife took over the business and traded under the name.  (Edwin Banfield, “Barometer Makers and Retailers 16660-1900,” 1991, Baros Books, Trowbridge, Wiltshire.)


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22.19  MOUNTAIN BAROMETER.   Scarce early 1900’s American-made aneroid barometer for use at altitude.   This lovely precision weather instrument has a white enameled brass dial protected by a glass face.  The bottom of the dial is signed “Taylor Rochester, N.Y. U.S.A. / Toronto, Canada.”  At the top it is marked “PAT. AUG. 18-1914.”  The dial is calibrated in inches of mercury reading from 26 to 31 in tenths of inches, divided by 2/100ths.  It is also marked with the standard weather indications “~STORMY – RAIN –CHANGE * FAIR – VERY DRY~.”  A blackened steel indicator needle points to the precise reading, overlaid by a brass set needle connected to a knurled brass knob through the glass.  The barometer is contained within its lovely solid bronze case with pivoting suspension loop at the top.  The unique feature of this barometer is on the back.  Rotating the knurled brass plate moves the entire  movement within, thus setting the reading for a given altitude.   The rim of the plate is calibrated in “FEET” of altitude from “3500 to 7000” in 100 foot increments.  Instructions read “ROTATE THIS PLATE UNTIL ARROW ON CASE POINTS TO THE ALTITUDE OF YOUR LOCALITY.  PATENTED AUGUST 18-1914.”  5 ¼ inches in diameter and 2 ½ inches deep.  6 ¼ inches tall overall including the suspension loop.  This fine instrument is fully functional and in a virtually pristine state of original preservation.  349

 

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22.24  “MOUNTAIN” BAROMETER.  Quite scarce early 1900’s American “Mountain Barometer” with the unique feature of being adjustable for altitude (elevation).  This precision instrument was made by the Tycos Company of Rochester, N.Y. as signed on the bottom of the white enameled dial.  The dial is calibrated for atmospheric pressure  in inches of mercury spanning the wide range from 25 to 31 inches in 2/100th increments marked by 10’s.  It bears the standard weather indications “@STORMY @ RAIN, CHANGE * FAIR @ VERY DRY @” with the added notations “LOW & HIGH.”  At the top it is marked “PAT. AUG.-18-1914.”  The reading is indicated by a fine blued steel needle overlaid by a brass “set needle” with knurled brass knob rove through the beveled glass cover.  The body of this instrument is solid bronze in its original flawless golden lacquer finish.   The back of this instrument bears the rare patented feature which allows it to be adjustable.  It consists of  a knurled disc calibrated in feet of elevation from 0 to 3,500.  The engraved instructions read, “FOR A SEA LEVEL READING ROTATE THIS PLATE UNTIL THE ARROW ON THE CASE POINTS TO THE ALTITUDE OF YOUR LOCALITY.”  The back also has an aperture for a set screw to further adjust the movement.  The top is equipped with a pivoting brass loop for hanging.  5 ¼ inches in diameter and 6 inches high overall.  Absolutely perfect condition is all respects.  The precise mechanism is lively and accurate.  The best!  395


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22.27  FRENCH BROMETER with THERMOMETER.   Finest quality late 19th century aneroid barometer made by the highly respected Parisian barometer making firm of Paul Naudet as indicated on the small “PNHB” logo at the top of the dial.  This handsome example has a silvered open face which frames the complex movement within.  The dial indicates atmospheric pressure in inches of mercury calibrated from 27.8 to 31.2 in 2/100th increments marked by 10ths.   It shows the standard weather indications of “STORMY, RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR and VERY DRY.”  At the top of the aperture it is marked “Made In France” and “HOLOSTERIC BAROMETER” (without liquid).   Of much added value and desirability is the fact it is fitted with a large curved mercury tube marked “FAHRENHEIT THERMOMETER” registering an exceptionally broad range of -18 to 148 degrees in 2 degree increments. The barometric read-out is made by the very precise blued steel indicator needle, overridden by the brass set needle attached to a knurled knob.  The knob runs through the beveled glass crystal with its old wavy glass.  The solid rose bronze case is of traditional form with a pivoting suspension loop at the top for hanging, but also fitted with a stout brass hanger for hard mounting to the ship’s bulkhead top and bottom.  This lovely antique barometer has just been professionally serviced and both functions are guaranteed to be lively and accurate. 5 ¼  inches in diameter,  2  1/8 inches deep and 6 1/8 inches high overall.  In our 35 years handling antique barometers, there are no finer examples than those marked PNHB.  For an accurate, functional instrument which is very decorative and has value as an antique, this is it!  The best.  595


The first practical aneroid ("without liquid") barometer is generally attributed to Parisian, Lucien Vidie in 1843, who was awarded an English patent for his device in 1844.  Vidie's patent rights expired in 1859, allowing other makers to produce instruments.  The most successful makers in France were Naudet, Hulot & Cie, who reportedly made 20,000 instruments between 1861 and 1866.  (1)

Another reference to the firm was made by Middleton who states, "...there were several makers soon after the patent expired in 1859, the most successful being Naudet, Hulot, & Cie.  According to Le Roux they made 20,000 aneroid barometers between 1861 and 1866.  They called them baromètres holostériques...  references occur in the continental literature to Naudet barometers and to holosteric barometers for the rest of the nineteenth century.  They acquired a great reputation and were widely imitated." (2)  Middleton goes on to state,  "For many purposes aneroids continued to be made - and are indeed still made - of a form very like that arrived at by Naudet, Hulot & Cie about 1860." (3)   In the Appendix is an entry for a barometer held in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.  It reads, "230,002  A "Holosteric  Barometer- Compensated, "made by Naudet & Co. Marked on the back of the case, U.S. Signal Service" (4) indicating manufacture around the time of the First World War.

Surprisingly, little is written about the innovative and prolific Paris aneroid barometer maker, Pierre (alternatively "Paul”) Naudet, although it is known that his firm was begun in 1861 and continued producing aneroid barometers into the 1930's. 

The dating and meaning of the markings HBPN (alternatively PNHB) are less clear.  An entry for a barometer sold on eBay indicates the markings refer to "Hulot, Pertius & Naudet, Paris, barometer makers in the 1930's.  However Andy Demeter, writing about the history of the Chelsea Clock Company notes, "With the possible exception of recording barometers, Chelsea did not assemble holosteric or aneroid movements for their barometers preferring to purchase them from the legendary French maker, Pierre (alternatively Paul) Naudet.  His firm's trademark is typically found in a circle on these early barometer dials with the letters "HBPN" as an abbreviation for "Holosteric Barometer, Pierre Naudet." (5)  On page 220 a barometer dial is pictured with the caption, "1909 Pierre Naudet barometer."

1. Edwin Banfield, "Barometers Aneroid and Barographs," 1985, Baros Books, Wiltshire, England, p. 21.
2. W.E. Knowles Middleton, "The History of the Barometer," 1964, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, p. 407.
3. Ibid. p. 409.
4. Ibid. p. 464.
5. Andrew Demeter, "Chelsea Clock Company, The First Hundred Years," 2001, Demeter Publications, Ltd., Boston, Massachusetts, p. 221.

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22.06  ANTIQUE BAROGRAPH.  Extraordinary, scientific grade turn-of-the-last-century weather instrument made by the well known English makers “Short & Mason, London.”  This lovely, fully functional instrument embodies the long-standing British penchant for form and function.  As such, the precision mechanism with gilded brass works and hardwood housing is a thing of beauty.  It employs 12 evacuated silvered bellows connected with a complex linkage system to a stylus holding an inking pen.  The linkage is all brass with steel pivots as mounted to the gilded brass bedplate.  It is decoratively-engraved with its makers, “Short & Mason London.”  The quill-type pen records a trace on the revolving drum.  A lever mounted on the front of the bedplate allows the pen to be lifted from the drum when not in use.  The brass drum is turned by a jeweled clockwork mechanism which runs for 8 days on a single wind, making one revolution per week.  To these ends there is a Fast/Slow adjustment feature under the removable brass cover and a separate winding key.  The interchangeable chart paper graph encompassing the drum is marked from 28 to 31 inches of barometric pressure in 1/10th increments on the “y” axis and is marked Monday through Sunday in 2 hour increments on the “x” axis.  The glazed wooden case is made of rich mahogany with all brass fittings and is supported on 4 wooden feet.  The sturdy scalloped base is complete with pull-out drawer containing 2 compartments.  The forward compartment is filled with original, unused gummed graph charts.  In addition there is an original pamphlet reading “S and M STORMGRAPH RECORDING BAROMETER, Directions For Use.”  The second compartment is for storing recorded charts.  The upper removable case contains its original old glass on all 5 sides.   This instrument measures 14 3/8 inches long by 8 ½ inches wide and 8 1/2 inches high.  Complete with the original ink vile with ground glass stopper and contents!  The entire presentation is in an outstanding state of original preservation, fully functional (the clock keeps good time) and is complete with at least 20 spare recording charts in pristine original condition.  Price Request Special Packaging


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22.09  WEATHER GLASS.   Authentic hand-blown glass weather instrument known as a weather glass, storm glass or thunder glass, as found in the homes of sea captains from the 17th through the19th centuries.  This exacting copy consists of a one piece glass vial with a hanging eye at the top, a curved swan’s neck spout, and terminates in a bulbous glass bottom.   It is complete with a hand-wrought hanging bracket of copper and brass.  In use the glass is partially filled with water so that the level can be seen within the spout.  Weather changes accompanied by varying atmospheric pressure are evident in the rise and fall of the water level in the spout.  The hanging bracket measures 12 inches tall overall and the glass is 9 inches tall and 3 ½ inches wide.  Perfect condition.  49

Bert Bolle in “Barometers,” 1982, Argus Books, Watford, Herts, England discusses the Thunder glass or “donderglas” stating, “The title of “weather glass” is more apt than “barometer” in the context of the instrument shown.  A barometer is a measuring instrument, as such, has a scale; a thunder glass does not have a scale.  Therefore the term “weather glass” is more suitable for this, nonetheless, decorative antique."

"In the illustration, one can see that the glass is hung from a small hole at the top and is filled with liquid.  This can be water with a dye if desired.  The instrument, about 10 inches high, functions on the principle that variation in air pressure will cause fluctuation in the water level in the spout.  Without a doubt, this instrument is only partly reliable as it is greatly influenced by variations in ambient temperature.  However, if the thunder glass is hung in a place where variations in temperature are minimized, it is an excellent indicator of variations in air pressure."

"Thunder glasses were characteristically Dutch and production got under way sometime in the early 17th century."
This example comes complete with the original instructions printed when we commissioned an old-school glass blower to make a few of these instruments in 1983.  Since then they have been in storage for more than 30 years!


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22.13  BAROMETER / ALTIMETER.  Large, extra nice late 19th century English gentleman’s traveling barometer with the dual function of being an altimeter. This unusually large portable instrument is in the form of a pocket watch with bow and retains its bright brass finish.  The silvered brass dial is hand-engraved.  It is calibrated from 25.5 to 31 inches of barometric pressure, divided down to 2/100ths of an inch.  It is marked “Compensated” and “Made in England”   The outer rim of the dial is marked in “FEET” from 0 to 5,000 divided down to amazing 20 foot increments!  To set and record a reading the rim revolves.  This is provided with pinpoint accuracy by the extremely fine steel indicator needle which is little more than a hair’s width in diameter!  This instrument is complete within its silk and satin-lined, hinged wooden case with Moroccan leather cover.  A small spring-loaded lever with brass button latch secures the case when closed.  3 ¼ inches in diameter and 1 ¼  inches thick.  The dial itself measures 2 ½  inches across.  Fully functional and accurate.  595


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