West Sea Company

13. Clocks & Chronometers

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN

 



7.87/13.81  REFERENCE BOOK "The SHIP's CHRONOMETER."  Marvin Whitney.  "The Ship's Chronometer," 1985, The American Watchmaker's Press, Cincinnati, Ohio.  Hard cloth cover with dust jacket, 474 glossy pages exclusive of index.  Exquisitely illustrated with photographs, detailed line drawings and charts.  Mr. Whitney, who served his apprenticeship and the United State Naval Observatory before and into World War II, is recognized as the foremost American expert on chronometers in the 20th century.  This large format book has chapters on "The Birth of Chronometers, Transporting, Handling and Cleaning,  The English Escapement, General Repairs, The Navigating Chronometer Watch, Pocket Chronometers, Some Rare & Unusual Chronometers, Innovative Designs in the Hamilton Chronometer, America's Foremost Chronometer Makers, Other American Chronometer Makers, Glossary, Bibliography and Appendix of Parts for a Hamilton Chronometer.  In short the most comprehensive book ever written on the topic, both historically and technically.  Perfect original condition.  Offered elsewhere from $89.95 to $206 and up!  Our price 89


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5.21/13.01  IMPORTANT CLOCK from U.S. NAVY MONITOR.  Extremely rare, identified engineroom clock from the American Naval monitor the U.S.S. TERROR.  This imposing timekeeper is made of heavy solid bronze.  The early form pressed copper dial is silvered with bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter ring.  The ship's name USS TERROR is prominently engraved just below the center arbor.  The case maker's name "ASHCROFT MFG CO. New York" is just below.  At the top, below XII is the Fast/Slow adjustment and below it is the subsidiary seconds bit indicating single seconds marked by 15's.  The dial is swept by large blued steel Breguet style "moon" hands.   The silvered dial shows some authentic wear.  The word "ENGINE ROOM" is stenciled on the dial -- faint but still visible.  Importantly the dial is original and has not been retouched or modified.  The classic flared ship's clock case is hinged on the left, opening to the right, closing on a skeleton key lock which retains its original key.  The mechanism is the best ship's clock ever made in America by the Howard Clock Company of Boston.  It features a bi-metallic balance, 11 jewels, 8-day spring barrel and lovely damascened nickel plates.  It is signed "E. Howard & Co. Boston" and is serial numbered "17."  The very low number indicates it was one of the first ship's clocks ever produced by Howard, soon after the Civil War.  The massive solid bronze case, produced by the Ashcroft Steam Gauge & Valve Co. has an 8 1/4 inch dial and a case flange of 10 ¾ inches,  It measures 4 inches deep and weighs an impressive 15 pounds!  It is in excellent original condition and is a strong runner after 150 years! SOLD


USS TERROR (BM-4)

TERROR was an AMPHITRITE class monitor with twin screws and double turrets.  She displaced 3,990 tons with a length overall of 263 feet, a beam of 55 ½ feet and a draft of 14 feet 8 inches.  In 1874, nine years after the Civil War, President Ulysses S. Grant ordered it built.  The contract was awarded to the William Cramp & Sons Shipyard in Philadelphia, a major builder of U.S. Navy ships at that time.  Work halted in 1877, but began again 6 years later.  The reasons for the delay were two fold.   Firstly, there was no foundry in the United States capable of producing the heavy armament specified in the ship's plans.  Secondly, advancements in Naval architecture were progressing so rapidly that innovations in design were overtaking the original obsolete specifications.

Still unfinished, the massive warship was towed to the New York Naval Yard for completion.  On April 15, 1896 USS TERROR was finally commissioned.  Assigned to the North Atlantic Squadron, TERROR operated up and down the East Coast.

 When the Battleship MAINE exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898 TERROR was dispatched to Key West, Florida, arriving on April 2nd.   On April 25th the United States declared war on Spain.  On the very first day of hostilities TERROR captured the Cuban vessel ALMANSAS.  In the following 2 days the monitor captured the Spanish ships AMROSIA BOLIVAR and GUIDO.  On May 12th Admiral Sampson's squadron began bombarding the Spanish batteries at San Juan, Puerto Rico.  TERROR, the fifth ship in the column, fired 31 ten inch shells in 3 salvos, scoring a direct hit on the shore battery.  For the remainder of the war TERROR cruised the West Indies and the waters off Puerto Rico.

Into the early 1900's TERROR served as a training ship for midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy.  She was ultimately decommissioned on May 8, 1906 and scrapped sometime in early 1930.
Edward Howard (1813-1904), apprenticed to the famous early American clock maker Aaron Willard, Jr., began his own manufacturing in Boston in 1840.  His firm was known as the E. Howard Co. until 1881.  The first clocks known as "marine clocks" made their appearance around 1860.  All of Howard's movements were very well made.  The Howard model 69 marine/locomotive clock had 11-jewels with plates of heavy brass, nickel plated and highly damascened.  (Marvin Whitney, "Military Timepieces," 1992, AWI Press).

Interestingly, the back of the dial of this clock is etched "U.S.S. Santee Feb 14, 1902."  SANTEE was a sailing frigate of 44 guns commissioned on June 9, 1861.  After active service in the Civil War SANTEE became the major training ship at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland for decades.  On April 2, 1912 SANTEE sank at her mooring.  The relationship between TERROR and SANTEE is unclear.  More fascinating research will prove valuable.


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13.03  IDENTIFIED SHIP's CHRONOMETER. EXTREMELY RARE American ship's chronometer from an identified sailing ship!  This particularly handsome navigational timepiece was made by the premier American makers "T. S. & J. D. NEGUS, New York No. 1439" as elaborately engraved on the perfect silvered brass dial.  The dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by solid gold spade hands.  The large seconds bit is over the "IV" showing single seconds marked by 10's.  The Up/Down winding indicator is below the "XII" reading 0 – 56 hours in 8 hour increments with "WIND" engraved at hour 24.  The dial is encircled by the silvered reflector ring and covered by thick beveled glass set in the knurled brass bezel.  The solid brass movement is a thing of beauty with brilliant blued steel screws, large bi-metallic balance with 4 timing weights, diamond end stone, spring détente escapement and of course chain drive fusee.  The top plate of the movement is numbered "1439'' as is the bottom of the chronometer bowl which retains its original orange lacquer. The bowl is slung in gimbals which rotate properly.  The classic fully brass-bound box is constructed in 3 tiers of rich rosewood.  The bottom section contains the original working lock with skeleton key and the pivoting gimbal lock.  The glazed middle tier contains the button latch closure and the front bears the piece-de-resistance -- the ivory nameplate engraved with the ship's name "- Schr - Mable Gale in lovely cursive script.  The upper lid is mounted on stop hinges and closes tightly on the button latch.  It has a six-pointed brass shield inlaid into the top and "whale tail" brass corners.  The box has inset folding drop handles and measures 7 ½ inches square by 7 3/8 inches high.  Complete with its original ratcheted chronometer winding key of the early type.  Overall condition is unquestionably excellent in all respects.  This chronometer is a strong runner after 150 years of faithful service! REQUEST PRICE Special Packaging

Thomas Stewart Negus was trained as a chronometer and watchmaker in England. He emigrated to America in the early 1840's when he was soon joined by his brother Thomas. In 1848 they established their nautical instrument company on New York's Wall Street. From 1869 the firm was located at 69 Pearl Street, New York City.

This chronometer actually predates the ship. According to Vaudrey Mercer in "Chronometer Makers of the World," 1991 N.A.G. Press, Colchester, Essex, England," Negus number 1593 is listed on page 210 as dating to 1875. Extrapolating, this chronometer, more than 150 numbers earlier, dates circa 1870. It is commonly held that most independent chronometer makers of the era produced up to 60 units per year.

In their reference book, "Pacific Lumber Ships." 1960, Bonanza Books, New York, co-authors Gordon Newell and Joe Williamson show a photograph of the 4-masted schooner MABEL GALE on page 45 captioned, "Mable Gale pictured here crossing the Columbia River in tow of Steamer Wanona, was a 183-footer, built by Hall Brothers of Port Blakely in 1902." The tug is clearly visible in the photograph on the ship's port quarter.

Schooner MABEL GALE, Official number 93343, Call Sign K.S.F.J. was listed as a 4-masted schooner of 762 Gross Tons, 183 ½ feet in length overall, 39.4 feet breadth, with a depth of 15 feet. Crew 11. Built in 1902 at Port Blakely, Washington. Home ported in San Francisco. ("List of Merchant Vessels of the United States – 1908.")

In 1928 the schooner MABLE GALE foundered in the Atlantic off of Lobos Island, Canary Islands, Spain. All hands were rescued. Obviously the chronometer was rescued too, as it bears the service label of Julius Goldstein & Son, Mobile, Alabama dated August 1942. This is the first chronometer out of over 100 we have handled in our 40+ year career that comes with tangible provenance from a sailing ship!


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5.16/13.02   RARE AMERICAN CHRONOMETER.  A scarce surviving example from a very limited production of full-sized ships' chronometers produced for the U.S Navy by the most prestigious American clock & watch company during World War II.  This amazing relic is Elgin's Model 600.  The silvered enameled dial is serial numbered (N) 610 dated 1943 within the seconds bit over the "6."  It has bold Arabic numerals swept by blackened spade hands over a minute chapter ring.  The 56 hour Up/Down is below "12" marked in 8 hour increments.  The dial is signed "ELGIN U.S.A." just above the center arbor.  It is surrounded by the silvered reflector ring under a beveled glass crystal set in its knurled brass bezel.  Built to exacting Navy specifications the brass bowl with gimbal lock is mounted in its gimbals slung in a rich brass-bound mahogany box of classic 3-tier construction.  The magnificent nickeled brass movement has 14 jewels with a large bi-metallic balance wheel, 6 timing weights and the state-of-the-art Guillimane hairspring.  The unusual two-part balance bridge has a diamond end stone.  The top plate is beautifully engine turned and is engraved "ELGIN 600 U.S. 14 JEWELS U.S. NAVY BU-SHIPS (N) 610, 1943."  This machine is fitted with Elgin's fusee drive and innovative detachable escapement – a first in chronometer manufacturing.  The handsome fully brass-bound mahogany box is equipped with 2 sliding button latches and bears the unique Elgin corking instructions on the brass plaque in the middle tier.  The bottom section has folding brass drop handles for carrying.  The chronometer itself measures almost 5 inches in diameter.  The box measures 7 ½ inches square by 8 inches high.  Condition is nothing short of remarkable in ALL respects.  This chronometer shows no signs of being used since it was manufactured 79 years ago!  Perfectly preserved, factory MINT original condition!  ATTENTION COLLECTORS!  You will not see this type of offering again!  Elgin's number 1 chronometer is in the Smithsonian Institution.Price Request Special Packaging

Marvin Whitney in his monumental reference book, "Military Time Pieces." 1992, American Watch Makers Institute, devotes an entire chapter to "Ship's Chronometer Elgin."  In it he writes, "Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Elgin National Watch Company devoted their entire production facilities to the war effort.  When the United States entered into World War II, our source of marine chronometers from Switzerland was immediately cut off.  Up until that time, the world navies depended upon Swiss and English manufacturers.  The Hamilton watch Company was the first to produce a ship's chronometer that met Navy specifications.

In order to prevent a recurrence of the critical shortage, Elgin was awarded a contract in 1943 for 3,000 chronometers.  On February 15, 1944 Elgin delivered their prototype chronometer to the Naval Observatory.  The last shipment of chronometers was received on May 31, 1945.  Shortly thereafter the war ended.  None of the Elgins were ever issued."

In November 1956 Elgin reported it had sold approximately 250 of their model 600 marine chronometers to the public.  In consideration of the fact that Hamilton made more than 12,152 Navy-type chronometers (as affirmed by serial numbers of recent sales) or a ratio of more than 50:1, this Elgin example is definitely a rarity in the realm of Navy chronometers!


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13.01 SHIP's CHRONOMETER.  Genuine post War ship's precision timekeeper made by the world famous, most prolific chronometer makers "Thomas Mercer" as engraved on the pristine silvered brass dial.  This finest quality marine navigational instrument has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by blackened steel spade hands. The serial number 20970 is within the seconds bit over the VI, dating this instrument to 1955.  At the bottom of the dial it is signed "THOMAS MERCER. LTD. ST. ALBANS. ENGLAND."  The 56 hour Up/Down indicator is below XII.  The handsome dial is protected by the bevel glass crystal with silvered reflector ring set in the knurled brass bezel.  This in turn houses the solid brass bowl slung in gimbals.  The state-of-the-art movement is all brass with lovely engine-turned spring barrel, blued steel screws, bi-metallic balance, Palladium hair spring, diamond end stone, spring detente escapement, and of course chain drive fusee.  The back of the dial and the bottom of the tub are stamped with the matching number 20970.  This is housed in its beautiful original rich mahogany box in 2 tiers with thick beveled glass top.  The lower tier has the original functional skeleton key and lock, while the upper tier bears the brass label engraved "SUPPLIED BY C. L. MALMSJO SODRA HAMNGATAN GOTTEBORG 20970," obviously for the famous Swedish ship building company.  The identified shipping line is an added bonus as to the history of this piece!  Complete with it original ratcheted winding key.  The chronometer measures 5 inches in diameter.  The box is 7 ¼ by 7 ½ inches and 7 inches tall.  Condition is absolutely pristine in all respects.  It appears to be in the same state  it was produced 67 years ago!  They simply don't come any nicer.  This is a great buy for the collector who wishes to add a top quality chronometer by a famous maker to their growing collection without spending a fortune.  WAS 2900  NOW! 2200 Special Packaging


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13.00 SHIP's BELL CLOCK.  A classic!  Finest quality 8-day ship's bell clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston, Massachusetts.  The 4 ½ inch silvered brass dial has bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by black Breguet-style "moon" hands.  Below the center arbor it is marked "CHELSEA SHIP'S BELL."  The dial is encircled by the silvered brass reflector ring.  The screw-on brass bezel with glass provides an air tight coverning.  The handsome all brass 11 jewel movement is Chelsea's 4L model, first introduced in 1950.  It is marked on the back plate "CHELSEA CLOCK COMPANY, BOSTON, U.S.A." and bears the serial number 581XXX.*   This dates the clock to 1953.  The movement is housed in its traditional ship's clock case of solid brass with flared bezel and mounting flange.  The case number matches that of the movement.  It measures 5 ½ inches in diameter and 3 1/2 inches deep.  Enhancing its handsome presentation the clock is mounted on a custom hardwood stand in gloss finish.  It measures 9 ½ inches high by 11 ½ inches wide and is 6 ½ inches deep.   The clock is a strong runner.  Perfect for mantel, shelf, library or desk.  Complete with period winding key  895

*  For the privacy and security of the purchaser the entire serial number is withheld.


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5.06 /13.98   U.S. NAVY CHRONOMETER.  Genuine state-of-the-art full size World War II marine chronometer developed for the U.S. Navy by the "Hamilton Watch Co. of Lancaster, PA., U.S.A." as marked on the dial and on the box nameplate.  This 85 size timepiece has a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals and minute chapter swept by black enameled spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is over the "6" showing individual seconds marked by 10's.  The 56 hour Up/Down indicator is below the "12." The serial number "(N)1356" and date "1941" are within the seconds bit. The heavy knurled brass bezel with thick beveled glass has a silvered reflector ring.  It screws onto the solid brass bowl slung in gimbals.  A spring loaded rotating dust cover protects the winding arbor.  The pristine nickel movement is beautifully damascened bearing the signature "MODEL 21 14 JEWELS HAMILTON WATCH CO. LANCASTER, PNNA. MADE IN U.S.A. (N) 1356-1941."  It features an oversize balance with 12 timing weights and innovative helical Elinvar hairspring.  It has a spring détente escapement and a chain-drive fusee.  The box is Hamilton's standard 3 tier type made of rich mahogany, fully brass-bound with inland corners in its original finish.  The sides are equipped with folding brass handles and the top 2 tiers have brass button latches for secure closure.  The entire unit is in untouched original condition.  All brass surfaces are original showing good expected exposure to their marine environment.  The surfaces of the wood are in excellent, unmarred finish.  The chronometer measures 5 inches in diameter.  The box is 7 5/8 inches cubed.  Complete with original ratcheted winding key.  An excellent time keeper. SOLD

Check out eBay prices.  This chronometer is nicer than anything currently offered.  Not only that, it is guaranteed to be as described.  Be wary of amateur sellers offering "No Returns."

As war clouds gathered around the world in 1940, it became more and more apparent that the United States would soon be drawn into a world-wide conflict.  Involvement would require a massive fleet of Navy and merchant vessels plying the vast oceans. Such deployment required accurate navigation, which up to that time was only feasible using a chronometer for accurate timekeeping at sea. The U.S. Government, acutely aware of the impending need, sent out an urgent request to clock and watchmakers of the era to produce an adequate time keeper. The Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, which had never produced a full size chronometer before, stepped up to the call with its famous Model 21.  This splendid precision instrument was inspired by the Swiss chronometer made by Ulysee Nardin.  But Hamilton took the basic design of the Nardin much further.  Perhaps the most innovative feature of the Model 21 was its use of interchangeable parts.  This made manufacturing and maintenance much more efficient.  Another was its use of Elinvar in the balance and hairspring.  Elinvar is not affected by changes in temperature, a fact that had plagued chronometer makers for more than two centuries.  In the end Hamilton effectively manufactured over 12,000 of these marvelous machines for Navy and civilian use, prompting the boast, "The chronometer that won the war."


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5.05/13.97  LIGHTHOUSE CLOCK.  Very scarce, highly sought after clock made for the United States Lighthouse Establishment by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company.  The silvered early style pressed copper dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by blued steel Breguet "moon" hands.  The center of the dial is marked "CHELSEA CLOCK CO. BOSTON U.S.A." below which is engraved "USLH ESTAB."  The subsidiary seconds bit showing single seconds marked by 10's is below the XII and the Fast/Slow lever is adjacent to the II.  This high grade clock has Chelsea's early model E movement with 7 jewel escapement.  The movement bears the serial number 129XX* dating it to April 9, 1904.  The handsome 4 ½ inch dial is housed in its heavy solid brass case with screw-on bezel and old wavy glass measuring 5 ½ inches in diameter.  Keeps good time after 118 years!  Complete with early style Chelsea "butterfly" winding key.  Price Request 

* For the privacy and security of the buyer this number is being withheld.  The movement number of this clock has been officially verified as being that of the U.S. Lighthouse Establishment, documented on page 289 of Andrew and David Demeter's reference book "Chelsea Clock Company, The First Hundred Years," 2nd edition 2014.

In 1789 Congress passed an Act creating the United States Lighthouse Establishment (USLHE) which was operated by the Department of the Treasury.  The Act also transferred ownership of all existing private American lighthouses to the U.S. government.  In 1852, the United States Lighthouse Board was created.   The Act dissolved the prior administration of lighthouses under the Treasury Department's Lighthouse Establishment.  The board consisted of six senior Naval officers governing 12 lighthouse districts, each having a Naval inspector who was charged with building lighthouses and maintaining their good working order.  The Lighthouse Board immediately set to installing state-of-the-art Freznel lenses in all newly-built lighthouses. The Board also oversaw the construction of the first lighthouses on the West Coast.  By the Civil War, all U.S. lighthouses had Freznel lenses.  In 1886, electricity was tested to illuminate the Statue of Liberty.  Thereafter the lighting of the statue was the Lighthouse Board's responsibility.  It remained such until 1902, when the "modern age in lighthouse illumination" began.   In 1900, the Lighthouse Board started converting lighthouses to electric service. 

In 1910, the Board was changed in favor of a civilian run "Lighthouse Service."  It is uncertain as to exactly when the U.S. Lighthouse Establishment became the U.S. Lighthouse Service.  Both terms for the agency appear to have been used interchangeably in the second half of the 19th century. 
In 1939 the U.S. Lighthouse Service itself was disbanded and merged with the U.S. Coast Guard.



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13.96  IMPORTANT CHRONOMETER.  Very early 1800's 2-day ship's precision timekeeper by the highly respected maker "James McCabe, Royal Exchange London 357" as signed in fancy script on the silvered brass dial.  This handsome timepiece has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by solid gold spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is over the VI showing single seconds marked by 10's.  The Down/Up indicator is below XII reading 0 – 56 in 8 hour intervals.  The chapter ring is marked in 5 minute intervals 5 – 60.  Speaking to its age this chronometer has the early form convex glass crystal.  The square bowl is slung in gimbals.  The all brass movement has a top plate engraved "Jas McCabe Royal Exchange 357 LONDON."  It is additionally stamped "357 IMC" on the back of the dial and "357" in the tub.  The exceptionally fine movement has a large bi-metallic balance with 8 timing weights, blued steel helical hairspring and screws, diamond end stone on the balance, diamond escape wheel bearing, spring détente escapement and of course chain drive fusee.  Workmanship is of the first order.  The fully brass-bound box is a thing of beauty, constructed of figural crotch grain African mahogany with brass whale tail corners, fancy inlaid escutcheons and iridescent mother-of-pearl disc on the front.  The disc has the unusual property of appearing to have depth.  The box retains it early form brass drop handles and is complete with its original box lock, skeleton key and ratcheted winding key.  The box measures 6 ¼ inches square by 6 ¾ inches high.  Outstanding original condition exibiting great age. SOLD

James McCabe (1748 – 1811) was born in Belfast, Ireland.  He was admitted to the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers in 1781.  He was described as "A very fine watch, clock and chronometer maker equal to Cole and LeRoy.  His best quality was signed "James McCabe," his second quality "McCabe" and his third quality "Beatson.""  After his death in 1811 the business was carried on as McCabe & Son until 1820, then McCabe and Strahan until 1838 when the Royal Exchange was destroyed by fire.

(Tony Mercer, "Chronometer Makers of the World." 1991, revised 2004, NAG Press, London, page 194.
G.H. Baillie, "Watch & Clockmakers of the World, Volume I," Third Edition, 1976, NAG Press, Colchester, Essex, page 205.)


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13.95  RARE CHRONOMETER by IMPORTANT MAKER.  Magnificent 4th quarter of the 19th century ship's 8-day chronometer with the large silvered brass dial engraved in beautiful cursive script "McLachlan, London 312."  This massive timekeeping machine features bold Roman numerals with a minute chapter ring swept by solid gold hands.  The large subsidiary seconds bit overlies the VI showing single seconds marked by 10's.  The equally large Down/Up indicator is below XII showing 0 – 8 days.  The huge bezel with silvered reflector ring is protected by thick beveled glass.  It is mounted in its highly polished brass bowl slung in gimbals with pivoting gimbal lock.  The massive winding key (the biggest we have ever seen) is retained in its slot at the right rear of the box.  The all brass movement is a thing of beauty with highly polished damascened plates, blued steel screws, diamond end stone on the balance, spring détente escapement, innovative Palladium hairspring and of course the "bicycle chain" fusee.   The complicated bi-metallic balance is that of Victor Kullberg's later form with multiple timing screws.  The reverse fusee is also a Kullberg trademark.  But firmly insuring this is Kullberg's output is the serial number "5273" twice stamped, once under the balance and again in the bottom of the tub, dating this chronometer to 1891.  The oversize chronometer box is also a thing of beauty having been constructed entirely of the lovely ebony-like wood known a "coromandel."  Only the most valuable and prized objects d'art were ever made of this extremely rare wood which is now virtually extinct.  The box is complete with its skeleton key lock, blank ivory disc on the front and classic brass shield inlay on the top.  Of valuable note is the fact that the glass lid in the second tier of the box is thick beveled glass.  We have never encountered this feature in chronometer boxes with their original lids in our 40+ years!  8 ¼ by 8 ½ by 9 inches tall.  The chronometer is just short of 6 inches in diameter.  Condition, in a word, is outstanding, in all respects.  Surely one of the very best we have ever had the pleasure of offering. SOLD

 Hugh McLachan was a chronometer maker working at 17 Upper Street in Smithfield, London from 1810-1859.  Apparently the firm continued under the name to the end of the century, retailing chronometers by other makers.

Victor Kullberg was without a doubt the preeminent English chronometer maker in the second half of the 1800's if not the entire century.  He was first awarded the gold medal prize in the Greenwich chronometer trails of 1864.  He went on to win at least 23 more of trials, including that of 1894 with his number 5933, closest to, but earlier than this example.  (Rupert Gould, "Marine Chronometer Its History and Development," 1923, 1960, The Holland Press, London).


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13.94  RADIO ROOM CLOCK.  Early 1900's ship's radio shack clock made by "Smith's English Clocks, Ltd. London. SMITH'S ASTRAL" as stamped on the backplate of the movement.  This large all brass clock has a white enamel dial with bold Roman numerals and minute chapter swept by blackened spade hands.  The chapter ring is marked in increments of 5, denoting both minutes and seconds.  The latter are indicated by the large red center sweep second hand.  As confirmation of its use in the radio room, the dial has 2 red pie-shaped sectors at 15 and 45 minutes past the hour.  These were to remind the radio operator to maintain transmission silence in order to listen for distress calls as specified by International maritime treaty.  The top of the dial is marked "GMT" for Greenwich Mean Time as used at sea.   The Fast/Slow lever is located within the "XII."  This clock has a thick beveled glass crystal with hinged bezel opening on the left for easy access to winding and setting.  The heavy solid brass case has a flanged mounting plate with 4 holes.  The high grade time only movement boasts seven jewels and has the early serial number "156."  As a further indication of its quality the lever escapement has an enclosed platform and extra hefty spring barrel wound by the massive key.  This clock is an excellent timekeeper.  8 inches in diameter and 4 inches tall.  The dial is nearly flawless and the case has acquired a rich statuary bronze age patina.  Complete with original key.  WAS 695  NOW! 395


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13.93   ROYAL NAVY CHRONOMETER.  Extra nice World War II vintage ship's chronometer made for the British Admiralty by the venerable firm of  "Thomas Mercer, St. Albans, England" as engraved on the perfect silvered brass dial.  This exceptional 2-day marine timekeeper boasts serial number 16218 which dates it to the most intense time of World War II.  But what makes it extra special is the marking on the bottom of the tub "H.S. 1" indicating it was used in the Hydrographic Service of the British Navy at such a crucial time!  This handsome chronometer has a silvered brass dial with bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by blued steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is above the VI and the Up/Down winding  indicator is below the XII.  It has a thick beveled glass crystal set into the solid brass bowl in gimbals, mounted into its rich mahogany box.  It is complete with gimbal lock and original ratcheted winding key.  The middle tier of the box bears the circular brass disc reading. "Thomas Mercer 16218."  The interior of the box exhibits two labels.  The latest of which is by "R. F. Whitten Chronometer Specialist, Australia."  6 7/8 inches high by 7 1/8 and 7 ¼ inches.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.  The chronometer is a good, strong runner.  2950 Special Packaging


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13.92   SUNDIAL.  Genuine 19th century pocket compass and sundial of the floating gnomon type.  This "automatic" time keeper features a dry compass card mounted with brass gnomon atop the gold pivot.  The card is marked with hours of the day in Roman numerals sub-divided in 15 minute intervals from IV A.M. in the morning to VIII P.M. in the evening.  The periphery of the card is marked with the cardinal and intercardinal points of the compass rose.  It is contained within its brass housing with convex glass dome.  The bottom is embossed "D. L. SMITH'S PATENT ** AUG. 23, 1870**" Ingeniously, the instrument self-aligns with magnetic north thus giving an instantaneous time reading as the sun's shadow from the gnomon falls on the card.  It is complete with its press-fit brass cover embossed with a classic sunburst reading "MAGNETIC TIME KEEPER & COMPASS."  1 inch and a half in diameter!  Outstanding original condition in all respects.  A charming real scientific instrument which is NOT a toy.  289


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9.97/13.91  BUTTERFIELD SUN DIAL.  An astounding offering!  This is a late 16th or very early 17th century cased pocket sun dial of the type known as a Butterfield dial, invented by Britisher turned Frenchman Michael Butterfield circa 1690.  This stunning surviving example is all brass made by "LeMaire Fils, Paris" as beautifully-engraved just below the compass.  The very early form compass needle rides over the engraved compass rose indicating the cardinal and intercardinal points of the compass marked N, S, and O, with the north point indicated by a fleur-de-lis.  The dial is constructed with a hinged gnomon, the angle of which can be adjusted for latitude as indicated by the beak of a bird on a scale reading from 40 to 60 divided in single degree increments.  The upright gnomon is spring-loaded and will lie flat on the body of dial on either side. The dial plate has 3 beautifully-engraved chapter rings for latitudes of 43, 46, 49, and on the extreme periphery 52 degrees, these encompassing the area between Gibraltar and the Shetland Islands.  The time indications in whole hours are marked in Roman numerals from 4 A.M. to 8 P.M. divided by 15 minute increments.   The reverse of the dial is engraved with at least 23 latitudes of prominent European cities of the time.  Incredibly this superb instrument comes in its original felt-lined wooden case with its durable fish skin cover,  all of which are in a remarkable original state of near pristine  preservation!  The octagonal dial measures 3 ¼ inches long by 2 5/8 inches wide, fitting neatly in its case measuring 3 ½ inches long by 3 inches wide.  The hinged lid of the case closes with a button latch, further secured by 2 hook and eye closures.  A remarkable scientific instrument in unheard of original condition over 300 years old!  Museum quality of the first order. 2879

An identical dial signed "Le Maire Fils A Paris" and dated 1740 is shown on page 146 of Harriet Wynter's and Anthony Turner's landmark reference work "Scientific Instruments," 1975,  Charles Scribner's Sons, New York.  That dial is missing its original case.

Michael Butterfield (1635 - 1724) was a British clockmaker who moved to Paris around 1663.  He worked at the royal court and was appointed chief engineer to King Louis XIV.  He opened a shop selling precision instruments at Rue Neuve-des-Fossés, Saint Germain in 1677.   He sold all forms of sundials.  But his most popular was the small travelling dial with the adjustable gnomon having a bird motif and three chapter rings.  Fashionably it became known as the Butterfield dial.  The basic design of this dial was known prior to Butterfield's design.  But his was quickly embraced and manufactured by other instrument makers in Paris and beyond.  Among Butterfield's famous clients was the Russian Czar Peter the Great, who visited his shop in 1717 and ordered a great quantity of gilt copper dials.


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5.02/13.90   U.S. NAVY DECK CLOCK.  World War I era ship's clock made for the United States Navy by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston.  The handsome brushed brass dial is flawless.  It has bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by blackened Breguet moon hands.  The dial is marked "U.S. NAVY Deck Clock No. 2" with the Naval Observatory's serial number (N) 2420.  It is also marked at the bottom "Made In U.S.A." underneath the blackened brass reflector ring.  The subsidiary seconds bit is below "12" indicating single seconds marked by 10's.  The all brass 11 jewel 8-day movement is marked "CHELSEA CLOCK CO. BOSTON. U.S.A." and is serial numbered 122XXX* dating it to July 6, 1918.  It is housed in its original classic ship's clock case of heavy solid brass with matching serial number and flared screw-on bezel.  The bezel retains its original old wavy glass held in with plaster.  5 3/8 inches in diameter by 2 ½ inches thick.  Outstanding condition in all respects.  The clock is a good timekeeper and the case is in a lovely high luster finish.  From America's dreadnaught Navy over 100 years ago!   Complete with period winding key.  849

* For the privacy and protection of the ultimate buyer this serial number is being withheld.



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13.87  SHIP's BELL CLOCK.  The classic American-made bottom bell clock by the venerable Seth Thomas Company as signed under the center arbor "SETH THOMAS" and marked "Made In U.S.A." under the "6."  This handsome all brass ship's clock has a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by blued steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit below the "12" shows single seconds marked by 10's.  Above the "12" is the Fast/Slow regulator. The "STRIKE" adjustment lever is next to the "9."  The flared brass bezel hinges on the right, opening on the left with a press fit.  Of great desirability is the unique exterior bottom bell which strikes the ship's bell every half hour with an amazingly loud, clear tone.  This clock has just been serviced by a professional watch and clock maker and is in tip top running condition, striking the ship's bells sequence properly.  7 inches in diameter, 10 ½ inches tall and 3 ½ inches deep.  Complete with period winding key. 789

In his landmark reference book "Military Timepieces,"  992, AWI Press, author Marvin Whitney discusses this clock on page 422.  "In the late 1920's Seth Thomas came out with their ship's bell model No. 7.  This 1-day, lever, count wheel striker was used in the "Monitor" model.  The height of the "Monitor" was 10 1/2 ", the same as that of their 1884-5 model but without a wooden backboard.  The count wheel ship's bell striking system prevailed in the industry for approximately 30 years."

Although officially described as a "1-day striking clock," this clock has been running in our possession for over 3 days on a single wind!


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13.86  RARE FUSEE SHIP's CLOCK.  Very unusual late 19th century ship's clock of Japanese manufacture.  This rare ship's timekeeper was made by the venerable Seikosha Company of Tokyo, a branch of the famous Seiko Company, well known for its high quality clocks and watches.  This early example has a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals swept by blued steel hands bearing the original luminescent paint.  The subsidiary seconds bit indicating single seconds marked by 10's is located below the "12."  The maker's name in Japanese Kanji is just above the winding arbor.  The Fast/Slow adjustment is above the "12."  When the bezel is opened the bottom of the dial reads "MADE BY SEIKOSHA, TOKYO, JAPAN."  The hinged bezel of nickel-silver opens on the left with a button latch.  It contains a thick beveled glass crystal.   The clock body is solid brass in an oxidized finish.  There are 3 mounting tabs for hanging.  The extremely heavy solid brass movement is a thing of Horological beauty, obviously copied after high end British clocks of the era.  It is of the very finest quality with thick brass plates.  The bi-metallic, temperature compensated balance is fully jeweled.  The blued steel hairspring has a long compensation curb.  It has numerous gold timing weights and a very unusual "L" shaped hairspring brace we have never seen before.  Speaking to its quality there is a brass shield encompassing the spring barrel for safety lest the fusee chain gives way.  The plates are attached in the early manner using taper pins rather than screws.  Of further significance is the fact that the platform is totally protected by a rectangular brass cover.  Uniquely, the backplate of the movement is equipped with 2 turned nickel "feet" allowing it to stand on its own for inspection and servicing.  The back of the clock case is painted with an inscription in Kanji.  More research could render additional provenance.  Beautiful original condition overall.  This clock keeps excellent time, having been recently serviced by a professional watchmaker. Complete with original, very large and unique winding key.  989

The K. Hattori Company was established in Tokyo in 1881 and its manufacturing arm known as Seikosha began production in 1892.  This clock was manufactured very early in that company's tenure.

At the turn-of-the-last century Japan appeared on the world stage as a formidable international power.  The Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) was fought between Imperial Russia and the Empire of Japan over their colonial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea.  Russia had long sought a warm water port on the Pacific Ocean.   Since the end of the first Sino-Japanese War in 1895, Japan feared Russian encroachment on its plans to create a sphere of influence in Korea and Manchuria.  Seeing Russia as a rival, Japan offered to recognize Russian dominance in Manchuria in exchange for recognition of its dominance in Korea.  But Russia refused, choosing to go to war after negotiations broke down in 1904.  The Japanese Navy preemptively started the war with a surprise attack on the Russian Fleet in Port Arthur, China.

The war ended in 1905 with Japan's total victory affirmed by the Treaty of Portsmouth mediated by President Theodore Roosevelt.   The decisive Japanese outcome resulted in a reassessment of Japan's position as a world power.  It was the first major defeat of a European nation by an Asian country.  This early top end ship's clock undoubtedly saw action in that conflict, likely on the bridge of a capital Japanese ship.


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13.63  VERY IMPORTANT EARLY CHRONOMETER.  Special, second decade of the 1800's early ship's time keeper from the age of sail, made by one of the most respected and award winning makers of his time, "James Murray, Royal Exchange, London, No. 673" as beautifully engraved in script on the silvered brass dial.  This early 2 day machine, made by the master, is a thing of beauty.  The dial is marked with the traditional bold Roman numerals and minute chapter ring.  The single seconds subsidiary dial is above the VI.  Attesting to its early origins the Up/Down indicator is calibrated from 0 – 48, not 0 – 56 as in later chronometers.  The dial is swept by solid gold spade hands.  The instrument is house in its solid brass bowl with rotating dust cover, slung in gimbals with traditional style English gimbal lock.  It is complete with its' original ratcheted chronometer winding key.  Also telling of it early age is the fact that this chronometer is housed in it original plain mahogany box of 3-tier construction with brass inlays.  The lower section is equipped with the very early-form felt-lined dust barrier.  The movement itself is a thing of beauty.  The unusually small movement (typical of 1800-1820) with diamond end stone has a polished back plate bearing the beautifully-engraved inscription "James Murray Royal Exchange, London No 673" with great flourishes.    The complex bi-metallic balance has an unusually large number of timing weights and a blued steel helical hairspring.  The movement is of the spring detent type with chain-drive fusee.  This chronometer is in outstanding original cosmetic and functional condition.  The diminutive movement measures 4 ¼ inches in diameter.  The dial is 3 ¾ inches across.  The box measures 6 ¾ inches cubed.  Complete with its original ratcheted winding key.  Certainly one of the finest chronometers we have ever had the pleasure of offering.  Without question a museum piece. Price Request Special Packaging

According to Tony Mercer in "Chronometer Makers of the World," 1991, N.A.G. Press, Eric Brunton Assoc., Ltd. Colchester, England "James Murray was born in Moffat, Scotland.  He was a very fine watch and clockmaker .  He went into partnership with Strachan in 1816 and was made a member of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers in 1817.  His No. 820 was taken by James Weddell on his voyage towards the South Pole in 1822.  Murray won the Premium Trial in 1823 with No. 816.  Report from the ""Glasgow Mechanic's Magazine," 1825, vol II, "The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty having advertised a premium of £300 for the best chronometer which should be kept at Greenwich for one year, thirty-six were sent thither by the principal chronometer makers in London, and were kept in 1823.  At the end of the year the prize was decided to be gained by Mr. James Murray, of Cornhill, whose instrument on one month varied not more than one second and eleven hundred parts of a second.  This distinguished artist, who had the honour of producing the best instrument ever known is a native of Muffat in Dumfires. The chronometer is now sent out with Captain Parry.""  If number 820 was active in 1822, then certainly, this number 673, must predate it by several years.  We are conservatively judging it to date 1818…nearly 200 years!


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13.85  WINNING CHRONOMETER.  Second quarter of the 1800's two day marine chronometer by the very famous London makers "Robert Molyneaux & Sons No. 1558, LONDON " as beautifully engraved in cursive script on the silvered brass dial.  This handsome navigational timekeeper is the early 2-day type with Up/Down indicator reading from 0 (Up) to 54 (Down).  It has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by lovely solid gold spade hands.  A large subsidiary seconds bit is just above the VI.  It indicates single seconds marked by 10's.  The prefect dial is protected by the classic domed glass crystal with thin knurled brass bezel.  The early movement is a thing of beauty having a bi-metallic balance with large segmental pie-shaped weights, blue steel helical hairspring, diamond end stone, blued steel screws, spring détente escapement and of course a chain-drive fusee.  It is slung in its solid brass tub mounted in gimbals, with thumbscrew locking lever in the front right of the box.  The handsome 3-tier box of crotch grain African mahogany is of simple form, indicative of its early manufacture.   It has an inlaid ebony dust combing in the bottom tier and is complete with its early form ratcheted "butterfly" winding key.  The front bears a large blank ivory nameplate and starburst inlays around the key escutcheon and button latch.  The top lid is inlaid with a classic brass shield.  The sides have inlaid flush folding brass carrying handles.  This chronometer measures exactly 4 ½ inches in diameter.  Its box measures 7 3/8 inches wide and 7 1/8 inches deep by 7 7/8 inches high.  Outstanding original condition is all respects.  The chronometer is a strong runner and keeps good time.  Circa 1833. Price Request Special Packaging

Robert Molyneaux began work as a chronometer maker in 1825.  He was a pupil of the legendary chronometer inventor and innovator, Thomas Earnshaw.  Robert took his two sons, Henry and Robert into his manufactory early on.  They were the winners of the prestigious Greenwich chronometer trails in 1832 with number 1038, once more in 1840, again in 1842 with number 2166, and yet again in 1843 with 2183.  In March 1840 Molyneaux received a British patent for his invention of a compensation balance with auxiliary.
Provenance:  Christie's London, Lot 52, July 1997.  Sold for £8,000.


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5.93/13.84   U.S. NAVY PT BOAT WATCH.  The famous World War II 35 size chronometer watch Model 22, made by the "Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster, PA, U.S.A." for the U.S. Navy as marked on the white enameled dial.  This state-of-the-art timekeeper was issued to Navy PT Boats and other ocean-going craft requiring accurate "over the horizon" coastal navigation.  It is the exact type of watch used on Lieutenant Kennedy's famous "PT-109."  It features Arabic numerals, subsidiary seconds bit, blued steel hands, and an UP/DOWN winding indicator showing a 56 hour duration.  It is stem wound and pin set, meaning it has an innovative safety feature at the 11 o'clock position -- a pin which must be depressed in order for the watch to be set.  The lovely state-of-the-art 21 jewel movement with damascened nickeled brass plates is marked "HAMILTON WATCH CO., Model 22 - 21 Jewels, Adj. to Temp. and 6 Pos., Made in U.S.A., U.S NAVY BU. SHIPS-1942."  It is contained within its original base metal case marked "KEYSTONE" with protective snap fit inner dust cover and outer screw-on cover engraved "BUREAU OF SHIPS U.S. NAVY N4927-1942 CHRONOMETER WATCH."  This deck watch is housed in its original padded solid mahogany 2-tier chronometer watch box with viewing port and button latch.  It measures 5 by 6 inches and 2 inches thick.  It is in absolutely lovely condition inside and out and is an excellent time keeper. SOLD

In his very informative reference book "Military Timepieces" AWI Press, 1992, Marvin Whitney devotes several pages to the Hamilton 22, 35 size non-gimbaled chronometer watch.  On page 396 he states "The design characteristics which contributed most to the superior performance of this watch were: 1) An unusually long mainspring; 2) A biaxial thermal expansion type balance wheel equipped with chronometer type timing weights; and 3) a cam type micrometric regulator.



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13.70  IMPORTANT BELL CLOCK.   Impressive, very scarce, large size ship's bell mantel clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston, Massachusetts.  This imposing, extremely heavy clock is Chelsea's famous "Base on Ball," special edition "Neptune Model" which was introduced in 1917.  It consists of a massive solid bronze case housing Chelsea's patented 11 jewel ship's bell movement of the finest quality.  It features the company's unique "fancy dial" which consists of a silvered brass face with raised gold Arabic numerals swept by ornate pierced gold hands running over a minute chapter ring.  The early form Fast/Slow adjustment is below the 12.  This lovely dial measures 8 ½ inches in diameter.  It is engraved with the retailer's name "Bailey, Banks and Biddle, Philadelphia" above the center arbor, and "Ships Bell" between the winding arbors.  It features a classic flared ship's clock bezel hinged on the right and opening on the left with a button latch.  The clock measures 13 inches wide on the base by 5 ¼ inches deep.  It stands 12 3/4 inches tall overall.  20 pounds!  The movement has just been overhauled by an AWI certified clockmaker and is guaranteed to be in tip top running condition.  With matching case and movement serial numbers of XX871* this clock dates to 1905 -- well over one hundred years old!  Cosmetically excellent with its beautiful original polished bronze surfaces which have acquired a mellow age patina.  Running strong and keeping accurate time after more than a century!  Complete with original Chelsea winding key.  3900 Special Packaging

According to Andy Demeter in his landmark reference book "Chelsea Clock Company The First Hundred Years," 2002, David D. and Andrew C. Demeter, Demeter Publications, Chelsea, Massachusetts, the Neptune model was "often mistaken for the "Commodore" due to their similarity in appearance, the Neptune incorporated an additional sub-base plate for the attachment of the ball feet."  (page 17).

The highly revered firm of Bailey, Banks and Biddle was founded by a Philadelphia partnership between Joseph Biddle and Andrew Kitchen in 1832 at 136 Chesnut Street, Philadelphia in 1832.  The firm was reformed in 1878 as Bailey, Banks & Biddle Jewelers.  At the turn-of the-last-century Bailey, Banks and Biddle were commissioned to produce the Great Seal of the United States.  Their historic creation remains to this day.  In the early 1900's the firm produced American military medals including the Congressional Medal of Honor, Silver Stars, and the first 40,000 Purple Hearts.

The exquisite all brass jeweled movement of this clock is stamped on the backplate:

"CHELSEA CLOCK CO.
BOSTON, U.S.A.
PATENTED OCT 26, 1898
SEPT. 19, 1898
JUNE 5, 1900
ALSO PATENT IN GREAT BRITAIN,
MAY 1, 1900"


* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser this serial number is being withheld.

 


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13.79  IMPORTANT BELL CLOCK.  Very scarce, large size ship's bell mantel clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston, Massachusetts.  This imposing, very heavy clock is Chelsea's famous "Base and Ball" model which was renamed the "Commodore" in 1917.  It consists of a massive solid bronze case housing Chelsea's patented 11 jewel ship's bell movement of the finest quality.  It features a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals swept by blackened Breguet-type moon hand over a minute chapter.  The silvered brass reflector ring encompasses the dial and the early-form Fast/Slow adjustment is below the 12.  The lovely silvered brass dial measures 8 ½ inches in diameter.  It is engraved with the retailer's name "Hardy & Hayes Co., Pittsburgh" above the center arbor, and "Chelsea Ships Bell" below, between the winding arbors.  It features a classic flared ship's clock bezel hinged on the right and opening on the left with a button latch.  The clock measures 12 inches wide on the base by 5 inches deep.  It stands 12 inches tall overall.   The movement has just been overhauled by an AWI certified clockmaker and is guaranteed to be in tip top running condition.  With matching case and movement serial numbers of XXX483* this clock dates to 1919, over one hundred years old.  Cosmetically pristine with a nice age patina.  Still running and keeping accurate time after more than a century!  Complete with original Chelsea winding key.  3200 Special Packaging

The exquisite all brass jeweled movement of this clock is stamped on the backplate:

"CHELSEA CLOCK CO.
BOSTON, U.S.A.
PATENTED OCT 26, 1898
SEPT. 19, 1898
JUNE 5, 1900
ALSO PATENT IN GREAT BRITAIN,
MAY 1, 1900"

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser this serial number is being withheld.



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13.77  RARE CHELSEA CLOCK.   Scarce, downright rare miniature bulkhead clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston.  The silvered brass dial is marked with bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by blackened steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is calibrated in single seconds marked by 10's.  The dial is marked with the  company logo "CROSS" with elongated letters.  In an unusual departure from its standard configuration the movement is held into its case with a knurled reflector ring which is threaded into the case!  This reveals the diminutive early gold washed Chelsea movement signed "CHELSEA CLOCK CO. BOSTON U.S.A."  The serial number 39XXX* matches the case number, dating this clock to 1913.  The solid brass case is the flared ship's clock type and retains its original nickel finish.  The screw-on bezel retains its original old wavy glass and turns on and off easily providing an airtight fit.  3 7/8 inches in diameter and 1 7/8 inches thick.  Outstanding original condition in all respects and an excellent time keeper.  Complete with original early Chelsea "butterfly" winding key.  They don't get any better than this! 895

* For the privacy and security of the buyer this serial number is being withheld.

In his landmark reference book "Chelsea Clock Company The First Hundred Years," author Andy Demeter depicts this clock on page 113 named the "Round Auto Clock," noting "(they) are often confused as marine models.  Justifiably so since the model was also sold to the U.S Navy as a Boat Clock prior to 1911."

"CROSS" may refer to the company founded in 1846 in Providence, Rhode Island, maker of premium pens.


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13.65  SHIP’s BELL CLOCK.  Genuine turn-of-the-last-century American ship’s bell clock by the venerable SETH THOMAS clock company as prominently marked on the dial between the two winding arbors.  It is further marked “MADE IN U.S.A.” below the “6.”  This handsome clock  features a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by blued steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit showing single seconds marked by 10’s is set below the “12.”.  A manual “STRIKE” lever is provided at the “9” o’clock position to set the bell sequence and the Fast/Slow lever adjustment is also just below the “12.”   The classic flared ship’s clock case has a hinged bezel with its original glass crystal hinging on the right, opening and closing on the left with a press fit.  The lovely solid brass case contains a screen on the bottom to emit the sound produced by the internal brass bell.  The clock strikes the ship’s clock sequence properly with a loud, clear tone.  The tone is especially rich because it is made on an actual bell and not a gong as in many other “bell” clocks.  7 inches in diameter by 4 ¼ inches deep.  Cosmetically fine condition.  The case is flawless.  The silver dial has just enough wear and patina to belie its 100+ year old age.  Runs approximately 2 days on a single wind.  Complete with period winding key.  595


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13.60  EARLY 8-DAY CHRONOMETER by FAMOUS MAKER.   Without question, one of the finest chronometers offered for sale in the world today.  This impressive marine timekeeper was made by “A. Johannsen 147 Minories London” as beautifully engraved in fancy script.  The large silvered brass dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter.  The oversized subsidiary seconds bit is over the VI indicating single seconds marked by 10’s.  Within, it bears the mark “No.  1040.”  At the top, under the XII, the ~UP~ DOWN winding indicator is marked  0 to 8 and reads “WIND” at the 7 sector.  The dial is swept by magnificent solid gold spade hands.  The circumference has a silvered reflector ring protected by a thick beveled glass crystal.  It is set in a knurled brass bezel.  Unscrewing the bezel reveals the massive movement within.  It has decoratively engine-turned plates, a large bi-metallic balance with timing weights, blued steel helical hairspring, diamond end stone, spring détente escapement, and of course a chain drive fusee.   Interestingly the balance is protected by a crescent-shaped shield which would prevent this delicate and complicated piece of machinery from being damaged should the chain let go.  The movement is housed in its beautiful bright brass bowl slung in gimbals and mounted within its large brass-bound solid rosewood box.  The bottom of the bowl contains a spring-loaded winding dust cover.   The classic oversized 3-tier box contains the pivoting gimbal lock on the right front and the original ratcheted chronometer winding key on the rear bottom tier.  It is complete with brass skeleton lock and inlaid ivory number disc engraved with the matching serial number “1040.”  The middle tier is glazed on top and bears the inlaid ivory marker’s disc on the front engraved “A. Johannsen  LONDON.”   A star burst escutcheon encircles a button latch which engages the solid rosewood lid with brass inlay.  Both upper tiers are fitted with lid stops.  The sides of the lower box have stout folding brass drop handles for carrying.  The chronometer itself measures 5 ¾ inches in diameter.  The box is 8 by 8 inches and is 8 ½ inches tall.  Excellent original condition throughout and an excellent timekeeper. SOLD

Asmus Johannsen was considered an elite English maker in the mid-19th century.   He moved to his 149 Minories address in 1865.  Born in Denmark, he was chronometer maker to the Royal Navies of Italy, Spain, Portugal, and the Imperial Navies of Austria and China.  He constantly figured in the Greenwich trials and was awarded two First Places.  Tony Mercer, author of “Chronometer Makers of the World,” speaks of him, “A great maker, supplying many ‘makers’ with movements.”  Mr. Mercer provides a Johansen number time line starting with number 1867 which dates 1870.  Clearly this chronometer is much earlier.


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13.58  CHRONOMETER WATCH.   The famous World War II era American deck watch made for the U.S. Navy by "Hamilton Lancaster, PA., U.S.A." as marked on the white enameled dial.  It features blued steel spade hands with Arabic numerals, minute chapter and an individually marked seconds bit at the "6" o'clock position.  A 56 hour winding indicator just below the "12" indicates "Up/Down," and is marked in 8 hour increments from "8-48." This finest quality ship's time keeper is embodied in a state-of-the-art 35 size, 21 jewel movement with lever escapement, stem wound and safety pin set.  The damascened nickel-plated brass movement is a thing of beauty.  It is engraved, "Hamilton Watch Co. Model 22-21 jewels Adj. to Temp 6 Pos. Made in U.S.A. U.S. Navy Bu Ships-1942."  It is contained within its heavy, solid brass tub with substantial brass counterweight, suspended in gimbals.  The gimbal assembly functions properly and can be locked by a thumbscrew and lever inside the box.  The 3-tier solid mahogany box has a glazed middle section bearing an instruction plate concerning setting the watch.  The top has a solid mahogany lid.  Both sections are hinged with clever box lid stops to hold the upper portions in place when opened.  Each contains a nickeled brass button latch which opens and closes easily providing a secure closure.  The front bears the nickeled brass maker's plaque reading, "Hamilton Watch Co. Lancaster, PA., U.S.A."  The entire unit is in remarkably pristine condition.  The watch is an excellent timekeeper having just been professionally serviced by a certified AWI watchmaker and is in top running condition.  Making this presentation all the more desirable is  the fact that it is housed within its outer protective carrying case with original leather strap.  The front of the outer box also bears Hamilton maker's plaque and is complete with hook and eye closure.  The outer box is in absolutely pristine condition as well. We have seen scores of these in our tenure.  This is the best one we have ever seen!  Price Request

Marvin Whitney, author of "The Ship's Chronometer," 1985, AWI Press, Cincinnati, Ohio writes on page 201, "This 35 size, high quality, 21-jeweled movement is an instrument of great beauty, precision, and endurance.  Anyone owning one of these fine timepieces has every reason to be proud of this possession."

In his second book on the topic of Chronometers, Whitney authored "Military Timepieces," 1992, AWI Press, Cincinnati, Ohio.  On pages 396-7 he writes, "These beautifully designed watches were truly remarkable timepieces, the performance of which was outstanding.  The two design features which contributed most to the superior performance of their chronometer watch were: 1) the unusually long mainspring, and 2) the design and construction of the balance assembly with unique biaxial thermal expansion rim of 18% nickel silver, invar arm and Hamilton Elinvar hairspring."


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13.51  IMPORTANT EARLY CHRONOMETER.  Two day marine navigational timekeeper by one of England’s most revered makers.  The handsome silvered brass dial is skillfully hand-engraved  “CHARLES FRODSHAM 84 Strand LONDON No. 3313.”  It bears two lovely cartouches consisting of a crown above an anchor, one reading “By Appointment to the Queen” and the other “Gold Medal Honour Paris EXN 1855.”  It has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter marked in 5 minute increments.  The large subsidiary seconds bit marked by 10’s obscures the VI.  The 56 hour Up/Down indicator is below XII and is marked “Wound Up/ Not Wound.”  The hand rotates counter clockwise contrary to most chronometers.  The dial is swept by delicate solid gold spade hands.  The movement, in a word, is magnificent.  It has decorative spotted plates in a bright finish, complemented by brilliantly blued steel screws and a diamond end stone on the balance cock.  The top plate is elegantly signed in engraved script “Charles Frodsham London.”  It has a bi-metallic balance, early style pie-shaped timing weights, a blued steel hairspring and of course a chain driven fusee.  Of special note is its very unusual auxiliary compensation consisting of brass spheres, one on each side of the balance arm.  This feature is of great importance and entirely unique to Frodsham’s historical and innovative output.  The special movement is contained in its brass chronometer bowl with gimbal.  The bottom of the bowl has a rotating spring-loaded dust cover for winding.  It is housed in a simple rich African mahogany box with gimbal lock and box lock with skeleton key in the lower tier.   The middle tier has an inlaid ivory disc.  Above it is the button latch with sun burst escutcheon locking the lid.  The lid has an inlaid brass shield.  Each side of the box has inlaid folding brass handles.  It measures 7 inches square by 7 ¾ inches high.  The interior of the middle tier bears the antique trade label of “H.G. BLAIR & Co. Cardiff, Chronometer Makers and & Opticians Est. 1829” with decorative images of an early chronometer and sextant.  This chronometer is complete with it exceptional early winding key, which in itself is worth hundreds of dollars.  Totally complete and in good working order.  7950 Special Packaging

Attached to the front of the chronometer box is the hand-written label from Castle & Co., Hull reading “TARNO.”  The TARNO was a general merchant ship launched in 1900.


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13.49  ROYAL NAVY RESEARCH CHRONOMETER.  Very scarce 2-day marine chronometer made by the venerable English chronometer making firm of Thomas Mercer for the Royal Navy as boldly engraved on the silvered brass dial.  It reads, “20134 THOMAS MERCER ADMIRALTY NO: 6472.”  Then at the VI o’clock position it is engraved “Thomas Mercer Ltd. St. Albans Eng.”  This handsome marine timekeeper has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by particularly beautiful blued steel spade hands.  The standard 2-day (56 hour) Up/Down indicator is below the XII.  The subsidiary seconds bit below the center arbor shows single seconds marked by 10’s.  In a very unusual departure from most chronometers the seconds wheel and components of the movement are visible through a “window” in the center of the seconds bit!  This chronometer has the rare feature of being a “break circuit” type, meaning it was used in hydrographic survey applications when sightings needed to be timed and/or coordinated.  To these ends a small electrical détente is positioned on the seconds wheel to detect the precise passage of each minute of time.  The window then, allows the observer to directly view the workings of this electrical take-off feature.  The dial is protected by its heavy brass bezel with silvered reflector ring and beveled glass.  The all brass jeweled movement is a thing of beauty with decoratively-spotted plates and balance cock, diamond end stone,  a large compensated bi-metallic balance with timing weights, helical Palladium hairspring, spring détente escapement and of course a chain drive fusee.  The movement and bowl are stamped with matching numbers “20134.”  As mentioned, this chronometer has an electrical take-off feature which is in evidence on the reverse side of the dial where contacts meet the interior of the bowl and lead to the exterior of the tub.  There, they stand as insulated terminals with knurled screws for attachment to wiring.  The heavy brass tub is complete with its protective spring-loaded winding dust cover on the bottom and its original gimbal.  The exposed brass surfaces retain about 90% of their original protective orange lacquer.  This chronometer is in excellent overall cosmetic and running condition.  A real rarity at a very real low price.  2500

In our experience in handling literally hundreds of chronometers, this is the first we have encountered which bears the Admiralty’s name and serial number on the dial.  Typically a chronometer dial will bear the British military’s “broad arrow” mark, with some makers boasting “Maker to the Admiralty.”  According to Mercer serial numbers, this chronometer dates to 1952.



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13.34  EARLY ENGLISH CHRONOMETER.  Important, extra fine English marine chronometer by the noted maker “Moncas Liverpool 9633” as beautifully engraved in flowing script on the silvered brass dial.  This highest quality navigational instrument exhibits several qualities indicative of its very old age.  The dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by solid gold hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit above the VI is divided in single seconds marked by 10’s.  The delicate hand of the seconds bit is scarcely thicker than a hair!  The unusually large and well-marked Up/Down indicator below the XII indicates 3 hour intervals marked by 6’s from 0 – 54, rather than the later standard 56.  It is also marked “UP, WIND, and 2 Days.”  It is swept by yet another solid gold spade hand matching the larger hands.  Telling of its early manufacture this chronometer has a beveled domed glass crystal with a thin knurled bezel.  The early form tub is square at the bottom with a spring-loaded winding dust cover.  It is slung in gimbals with an unusual, non-locking gimbal restraint and a matching brass holder for the winding key – both very early innovative features.  The diminutive all brass movement with beautifully blued screws has a bi-metallic balance with segmental pie-shaped weights typical of the 1820’s, blued helical hairspring, diamond end stone and of course a chain drive fusee.  Execution of all components is simply exquisite in every respect.  All of this is contained in its original brass-bound African mahogany box.  The figural wood was obviously chosen for its rich, dense nature, showcasing the box maker’s art at its finest.  Inlaid in the middle tier is the circular ivory number plaque reading “9633” matching the dial.  The top is inlaid with a brass shield, as is the key escutcheon on the front and typical brass drop handles on the sides.  A button latch secures the top lid.  Again, telling of its age, the hinges do not have stops, but open fully.  In addition, the lower section of the box has a felt dust barrier vs. the later form knife edge seal.  The chronometer itself is 3 7/8 inches in diameter.  The box is measures a very diminutive 6 inches square by 6 1/8 inches high.  A superb example of England’s finest output from the early 1800’s when chronometers were just starting to come available.  This is definitely museum quality.  5950  Special Packaging

John Moncas was by no means a prolific maker.  He was much noted for his quality pocket watches.  Quite likely this was only the 33rd chronometer he ever produced.  In the early 1800’s makers were very aware of numbering their machines realizing that high numbers indicated tied and true machines.  To purchase “number 1” meant that the maker’s output had not yet been tested.  It made much more sense for the wary buyer to purchase number 9633 than to purchase number 33.



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13.32  IMPORTANT CHRONOMETER.  Most desirable 2-day marine chronometer by one of England’s finest and most revered horologists.  This is John Edward Dent marine chronometer number 1590 as signed on the silvered brass dial “DENT LONDON 82 Strand No. 1590” and again on the porcelainized nameplate on the front of the box, “DENT 1590.”  The immaculate dial, unusually large for this type of configuration, features bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by delicate blued steel hands.  The subsidiary second bit is below XII and indicates 0 – 56 hours with the unusual additional markings of “UP, WIND, 2 DAYS, and DOWN.”  It is protected by the early form domed glass crystal with thin brass bezel. The movement is housed in its gimbaled brass bowl with locking lever at the left rear and original ratcheted winding key, twice marked “1590,” on the right.  The magnificent all brass movement is a thing of beauty, with decoratively-spotted shiny brass plates, turned brass pillars, large bi-metallic balance with early form pie-shaped segmental timing weights, blued steel helical hairspring, diamond end stone in the balance cock, highly blued steel parts, spring détente escapement, and of course a chain drive fusee.  The inside of the bowl is stamped “DENT” and “1590.”  The exterior bottom of the bowl exhibits a very unique dust cover over the winding arbor.  It consists of a spring-loaded lever with cap covering the aperture.  This is a much more complex feature over the typical rotating disc found on virtually all other chronometers.  The simple crotch grain African mahogany box is indicative of early 1800’s chronometers.  It has folding drop handles on each side and an inlaid brass key escutcheon in addition to the previously mentioned maker’s plaque.  This extremely rare navigational timepiece measures a diminutive 6 ¼ inches cubed.  The unusually large dial measures 4 inches in diameter.  Absolutely outstanding condition in all respects.  It is a strong runner and is virtually perfect cosmetically.  Circa 1842.  Price Request Special Packaging

Edward John Dent (1790-1853) was certainly one of the preeminent English horologers in the first half of the 1800’s.  During his very productive life he set up a large number of factories and workshops turning out his inventions and products.  According to Tony Mercer in “Chronometer Makers of the World,” Dent began his business career in 1814 at 64 the Strand and 28 Cockspur Street in London.  He moved to 84 the Strand in 1840.   In 1828 his chronometer No. 114 won the Premium Trails at Greenwich.  This fact caught the eye of pioneer chronometer maker John Roger Arnold who took Dent in as a partner in 1830.  The chronometer making partnership lasted 10 years.  Following their partnership Dent moved to 84 the Strand in 1840.  A number of Dent’s chronometers accompanied famous expeditions to both Polar regions and the tropics.   No. 1800 accompanied David Livingston during his African explorations.  In 1841 Dent was granted the Royal Warrant as “Chronometer Maker to the Queen and the Prince of Wales.“   Among his achievements beyond chronometer making, Dent was the maker of the famous “Big Ben” Parliamentary tower clock in London.  He designed and produced a very early form of aneroid barometer (without liquid) which revolutionized barometers at sea.  He also invented and produced his patented depleioscope which used the sun’s rays to determine local apparent noon for the purpose of accurately setting of watches.

In his monumental biography of E. J. Dent, Vaudrey Mercer, author of “Edward John Dent and His Successors,” 1977, The Antiquarian Horological Society, Church Hill, Ramsgate, England  indicates Dent Marine Chronometer No. 1581 as dating 1841.  Then bracketing Dent Marine Chronometer No. 1600 is dated at 1842.


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13.99   WW I TORPEDO BOAT CHRONOMETER WATCH.  Rare marine chronometer watch manufactured by the highly respected Swiss firm of "LONGINES, SWISS" as marked on the perfect silvered dial.  This large timekeeper in pocket watch format features a snap fit bezel with glass crystal covering a bold Roman numeral dial.  The pristine dial has a minute chapter and inset seconds bit at the bottom with a 36 hour Up/Down below XII.  The double hinged back cover is stamped "0.800" fine silver and opens to reveal the exceptional 17 jewel movement with decoratively damascened plates.  It is stem wound, stem set, with a lever escapement and compensated balance.  The movement is signed, "17 JEWELS ADJ. LONGINES Co. Swiss."  This high grade deck watch is housed in its original satin-lined mahogany inner box with splined construction and brass closures.  As a collectible, what is exceptional is the fact that it is complete with its outside carrying box with padded green felt interior and original leather carrying strap.   The watch itself has a dial 2 ¼ inches in diameter.  The solid silver case is 2 ¾ inches in diameter and 3 ¾ inches high inclusive of the bow.  The inner case measures 5 by 6 by 2 1/8 inches.  The outer case is 9 ¼ inches wide, 8 ½ inches long and 6 inches high overall.  The entire offering is in beautiful original condition and the watch is an excellent timekeeper.   Price Request

According to Marvin Whitney, esteemed author of "Military Timepieces," 1992 American Watchmakers Institute Press, the Longines deck watch was introduced to the U.S. Navy in 1904. It was often referred to by other world navies as a "deck or chronometer watch or compteur." Whitney describes it on page 295 as, "Caliber 21.29, 17 jewels, 36 hours, bimetallic balance, cam regulator, silver case."

This item comes form the prestigious collection of a very well known Admiralty Law lawyer who for years only collected the best examples of important maritime-related artifacts.

Several weeks ago a similar watch with a scratch on the dial was offered on eBay.  It had a plain brass case minus the outer carrying case!  The "Buy It Now" price was $4,750. Item 400981457331.


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13.88  MINT CHELSEA CLOCK.  An amazing find!  Offered here is an older large Chelsea ship’s bell clock in unused, factory mint condition -- still in its original presentation box!  This is an 8 ½ dial ship’s bell clock featuring a silvered brass dial with large Arabic numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by Breguet-style blued steel “moon” hands.  The dial is marked “CHELSEA SHIP’S BELL” between the two winding arbors and the Fast/Slow micrometer adjustment is at the 9 o’clock position.  It is complete with the silvered brass (not plastic) reflector ring encircling the dial.  The high quality 11 jewel movement is Chelsea’s finest quality all brass ship’s bell type with lever escapement made in America. The massive brass case is of the classic ship’s clock type with flared bezel, hinged on the right, opening and closing with a button latch on the left.   The case number XXXXXX* matches the movement number, dating the clock to the early 1990’s.  The case measures 10 1/8 inches in diameter on the bezel, 10 ½ inches wide on the mounting flange and is 4 inches deep.   This clock comes complete in its original box with felt-covered foam rubber padding measuring 12 ½ by 14 inches and 5 ½ inches thick.  The entire presentation weighs nearly 19 pounds!  Complete with original Chelsea-marked winding key.  Price Request

*  For the privacy of the ultimate purchaser the serial number is being withheld.

The Chelsea Company website offers a new 8 ½ inch ship’s bell clock for the reduced” price of $3,230.00.


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13.69  ENGLISH CHRONOMETER.  Elegant 3rd quarter  19th century 2-day marine timekeeper by the respected nautical instrument maker “JOSEPH SEWILL 61 South Castle STRT  LIVERPOOL.” as prominently engraved on the silvered brass dial.  It is additionally marked in fancy script, “Maker to the Admiralty” and number “4030” within the extra large seconds bit over the 6 o’clock position.  The especially handsome dial is adorned with 2 prize medal emblems from 1862 and the International Exhibition of 1867.  Both are accentuated in red, as is the address “30 Cornhill London.”  The 12 hour dial  features bold Roman numerals with a minute chapter marked in 5’s, swept by solid gold spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is sub-divided into single seconds marked by 10’s.  The 56 hour Up/Down indicator is located below the “XII.”  The dial is covered by the beveled glass crystal set in a heavy brass bezel with silvered reflector ring.  It is housed in its solid brass bowl with rotating winding dust cover on the bottom, slung in gimbals with  knurled gimbal lock.  The particularly lovely all brass movement with diamond end stone and blued steel screws exhibits highly polished plates with decorative engine turning.  The large compensated bi-metallic balance has a blued steel helical hair spring, a spring détente escapement and a chain drive fusee.  Both the tub and the back plate are stamped with the serial number “2297” indicating it was one of Sewill’s earlier movements, circa 1868, ultimately finished and sold by his son, John.  This would explain the placing of the 1867 medallion on the dial and the addition of the later 30 Cornhill address within the seconds bit.  The entire assembly is housed in its exquisite, fully brass-bound box of solid rosewood with brass furniture.  The box measures 7 ¼ inches cubed and the dial is 4 inches in diameter, sight.  Complete with its original ratcheted chronometer winding key.  Excellent original condition in all respects and an excellent time keeper.  SOLD

Born in 1800, Joseph Sewill began his business at 8 Duncan Street, Liverpool in 1839 under the name “Sewall.”  In 1845 he moved to 61 South Castle Street.  He maintained this business address until his death in 1876.  Sewill was a maker to the Royal Navy and the Queen of Spain.  He patented his own auxiliary compensation and was awarded the top prize at the Greenwich Trials in 1874.  Sewill was known to have made watches, chronometers, barometers and sextants.  His sons, John and Frank, carried on the firm name until 1905.  (Tony Mercer, “Chronometer Makers of the World,” 1991, NAG Press, Clerkenwell, London, p. 236).   John established a branch office at in London at 30 Cornhill in 1875.


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13.62  IMPORTANT CHRONOMETER.   Most rare navigational timepiece made  by the  pioneer English makers at the time when chronometer making was still in its infancy.  This incredible 2-day example was made by the venerable partnership of William Parkinson and William James Frodsham, begun in 1801 and actually dates to only a year later – 1802!  The diminutive navigational timekeeper has a silvered brass dial beautifully hand-engraved with the makers’ signatures “Parkinson & Frodsham Change Alley London 122” amidst flourishes.  The dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter marked in 5 minute intervals swept by blued steel spade hands.  A subsidiary seconds bit is above the VI position with a fine blued steel needle hand.   Indicative of its early origin, it has no Up/Down indicator – a feature which came some 20 years later on chronometers produced by these makers. The dial is protected by its classic early form convex crystal.  The squared tub with rotating dust cover on the bottom is slung in gimbals in its unusually small box with gimbal lock and ratcheted winding key.   The movement is housed in Frodsham’s “signature” inner dust cover.  It is absolutely a thing of beauty with its diamond end stone,  blued steel helical hairspring, large compensated balance with early-form segmental pie-shaped weights and beautifully engraved brass top plate with the signature “Parkinson & Frodsham, Change Alley, London, No. 122.”  The exceptionally small plain mahogany box, indicative of this early period, has all brass furniture and is complete with its original box skeleton key and old style folding brass drop handles.  Telling of its early origins it has a felt-lined dust strip surrounding the precious mechanism.  The front of the chronometer box is inlaid with the matching ivory nameplate “122.”  5 ¼ inches square and only 5 ½ inches high – smaller than most deck watches!  Lovely original condition.  The movement has just been thoroughly serviced in England by a former employee of the Mercer Company of chronometer fame and is guaranteed to be in tip top running condition.  The box and all components are original.  An amazing surviving relic from the early days of sail, worthy of the finest museum! SOLD


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13.82  CLOCK and BAROMETER SET.  Charming, near miniature clock and matching barometer pair made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Co. of Boston.  This matched set is absolutely of the finest quality to be found.   Known as the "Manhattan" model it consists of Chelsea's high grade, jeweled time only clock having a silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals and blued steel spade hands.  With a serial number of XXXXXX* this set can be dated to precisely to November 9, 1939. The matching barometer, made by Paul Naudet of Paris is marked "Made In France PNHB Compensated, Holosteric Barometer."  It features a very high quality movement with an open face silvered dial calibrated in inches of mercury from 27.7 to 31.3 in 5/100th increments. It bears the standard weather indications, "RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR," etc. and is equipped with a delicate blued steel indicator needle and a brass set needle attached to a knurled knob running through the crystal. The bottom of the dial is fitted with a gracefully curving Fahrenheit thermometer calibrated in 2 degree increments from -6 degrees to 156! Both units are housed in their original heavy solid brass cases with10 decorative ship wheel "spokes" and knurled screw-on bezels. Each unit measures 4 3/4 inches in diameter overall with a 3 3/4 inch diameter mounting flange. The dials are 2 5/8ths inches across each.  The 8 day clock is a good timekeeper and is complete with the original Chelsea-marked winding key.  The barometer/thermometer functions are working and accurate. Outstanding cosmetic condition throughout!   Request Price

According to Andy Demeter in his book "Chelsea Clock Company The First 100 Years," 2001, David D. and Andrew C. Demeter, Chelsea, Massachusetts, the Manhattan set was, "introduced in 1937 for suggested use on motor boat instrument boards. These matching clock and barometer/thermometer models were available individually or as a set. This pair is essentially the Viking model with the addition of spokes around their circumference and like the Viking set, the Manhattan enjoyed a long life on the production line."

*For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.


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13.41 CLOCK / BAROMETER/THERMOMETER  SET.   Extremely attractive, very scarce turn-of the 1900’s, genuine ship Captain’s cabin presentation featuring a high quality clock, barometer and thermometer mounted in a heavy, superbly-carved solid mahogany mount with a classic ropework border.  This set consists of 3 instruments.  The left side is an aneroid barometer reading atmospheric pressure from 26.5 inches of mercury to 31.5, calibrated by 2/100th inch increments.  The fancy Victorian dial is marked with the standard weather indications “Stormy, RAIN, Change, FAIR, Very Dry” with explanations on foretelling the weather by “RISES” and “FALLS.”  It is signed “Simpson Lawrence Co., Glasgow.”  The fine blackened steel indicator needle is overlaid by the brass set needle which is connected to a knurled brass knob rove through the beveled glass crystal in its brass bezel.  The center item is a mercury thermometer calibrated from 0 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit in 2 degree increments.  The clock function is of the very highest order, made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company.  It too has a beveled glass crystal in a brass bezel hinged on the left, opening on the right with a spring latch to allow access for winding and setting.  The clock has a silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals and minute chapter swept by blackened steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit covering the “6” shows single seconds and is marked “CHELSEA.”  The retailer, “Joseph Jones, New York, U.S.A.” is identified above the center arbor.  This clock is an accurate timekeeper and runs 8 days on a single winding.  Complete with period Chelsea-marked winding key.  This lovely presentation measures 15 inches wide by 9 inches high and 2 ¾ inches thick.  Attesting to its shipboard use, brass mounting brackets are present top and bottom to fasten it securely to the bulkhead.  The carving of this set is of the first order, obviously done by a skilled ship carver.  This is a very rare ship Captain’s cabin item of unsurpassed quality -- certainly one of the finest we have seen in our 35 years.  The best!  2195


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Description: 13.08


13.08 NAUTICAL CLOCK AND BAROMETER SET. Handsome 3rd quarter of the 19th century English wall clock and barometer set with a nautical presentation. This high quality set is housed in a beautifully hand-carved oak case in the form of a large kedge anchor with the dials encircled by rope-carved borders. Both dials are finished in white enamel and are protected by beveled glass crystals. The clock has Roman numerals, Breguet-type moon hands and a minute chapter. The all brass 8-day jeweled movement is of the rare, early cylinder escapement type and runs well. The barometer is open faced showing its high quality movement. The dial is marked from 25 to 31 inches of mercury in 2/100ths increments with the standard weather indications, "RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR," etc. Both instruments are accessible from the rear. The clock has a hammered brass press-fit cover easily removed for winding and the barometer has a wooden cover secured by unusual slotted washers. The back of the case bears a wood-branded Victorian "Registration of Designs Office" mark used to identify pottery, wood and metal objects produced in England during the period from 1842 through 1883. Using it we can date the production of this clock/barometer exactly to June 19, 1873. (F, M, 19). The entire presentation measures 21 inches high and 10 inches wide. Outstanding original condition showing 140 years of careful use. 1395 Special Packaging


Description: 13.08BACK

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13.21


13.21 EARLY SHIP'S BELL CLOCK. Genuine early 1900's American ship's bell clock made by Seth Thomas of Thomaston, Connecticut. This quality ship's clock has a silvered brass dial with bold black Roman numerals, blued steel spade hands, minute chapter ring and a seconds bit showing individual seconds below "XII." The dial is signed "SETH THOMAS" between the two winding arbors and is further marked "Made In U.S.A." below "VI.". The Fast/Slow adjust lever is above the 12 o'clock position and the manual strike lever marked "Strike" is left of "IX." The glazed hinged bezel with reflector ring opens from the left with a tight press fit. The case is the classic ship's clock type with flared bezel and is all brass in its original nickel finish. There is a screen at the bottom of the clock which allows maximum bell sound and it does so, ringing the ship's bell sequence properly with a loud, clear tone. The clock has just been thoroughly overhauled by a professional AWI-certified watchmaker and is in tip top condition. It is considered a 48 hours type. But in our possession since servicing, it has run 4 days on a single winding. 7 inches in diameter and 4 inches deep. Circa 1910. Excellent original condition showing wonderful age and absolutely no abuse. 495


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13.56  YACHT WHEEL CLOCK.  Certainly one of the most recognizable and most sought after clocks ever made!  This impressive ship’s bell clock was manufactured by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston for the retailers “BROCK AND COMPANY” as engraved on the silvered brass dial.  Known as the “Mariner,” this clock contains Chelsea’s high quality jeweled ship’s bell movement with a 6 inch dial, Arabic numerals, minute chapter, blackened steel Breguet-type “moon” hands and reflector ring.  The enduring appeal of this clock is in its magnificent presentation.  It has a classic ship’s clock case with flared bezel hinging open with a spring-loaded button latch.  That solid brass case is then encircled by a massive bronze “ship’s wheel” with ten turned brass spokes.  It sets atop a graceful heavy bronze plinth mounted to a solid mahogany backboard and base.  The entire presentation weighs an astounding 25 pounds and measures 17 ¼ inches high overall!  The bezel of this clock is 7 ¼ inches in diameter and it measures 14 inches wide from spoke to spoke, while the base is 12 ¼ inches wide by 5 3/8 inches deep.  With a serial number of XXXXXX* this clock dates to 1956.  It is in excellent running condition and is a good time keeper, striking the ship’s bell sequence properly with a clear sonorous tone.  It is in excellent cosmetic condition, exhibiting only minor wear to the dial, well expected after more than a half century of use.  Complete with original Chelsea-marked brass winding key. Request Price Special Packaging

Brock and Company was a prominent, nationally recognized jewelry firm, certainly the most important jewelry store in Los Angeles. Brock's was founded by George A. Brock in 1903. In growing the company, Mr. Brock merged a number of other established Los Angeles jewelers into Brock & Company, including S. Nordlinger & Son, which had operated in Los Angeles since the late 1800's. In the 1920's, George Brock obtained a 99-year ground lease on the property at 515 West Seventh Street, and soon the custom-designed structure (now housing Seven Grand) was built.

With son George C. Brock at the helm, the company continued to grow. A second store was opened on Wilshire Boulevard, in Beverly Hills. At that time Tiffany and Co. even proposed the merger with Brock of "Tiffany-Brock & Co." However Brock's valued their independence and the merger did not take place.

In the early 60's, George C. Brock decided to retire. Ben Weingart, a young real estate broker in the 1920s, had been involved in the 99-year ground lease for the Brock & Co. parcel on Seventh Street. He approached Brock about purchasing some land owned by the company. Mr. Brock told Weingart that the only way he could acquire the land was to buy the company.

Mr. Weingart did just that, purchasing the single remaining Brock & Co. store downtown in 1964. Thereafter Mr. Weingart brought in a liquidator who operated the business for a few years, gradually selling off its inventory. The jewelry business ended, and some of the store fixtures were sold. Clifton's rented the building installed a cafeteria. George C. Brock died in 1967.

Originally offered as the “Yacht Wheel Clock with Base” in 1906, Chelsea gave this configuration its own identity as the “Mariner” in 1928.  The model was ultimately discontinued in 1984.

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.
  
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13.40 CHELSEA MARINER. The classic ship's bell mantel clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston as marked on the silvered brass dial, "CHELSEA SHIP'S BELL." This impressive timekeeper has Arabic numerals with blued steel Breguet-type "moon" hands and a minute chapter. The perfect 4 inch silvered brass dial is encircled by its original reflector ring and has a hinged bezel with button latch opening from the left for easy winding and setting access. The heavy brass case is surrounded by a brass and bronze "ship's wheel" with 10 spokes and is mounted on a bronze pedestal affixed to its full length mahogany back with sub-base. The pedestal retains its original factory statuary bronze patina. The all brass jeweled movement is Chelsea's finest. With a matching case and movement number of XXXXXX* this clock dates to 1948. 14 inches high, 10 1/4 inches wide and 5 inches deep. Outstanding condition in every respect. It is hard to believe that this clock, in such fine condition, is over 60 years old! It is rare to find these old clocks in their original factory finish. Complete with Chelsea-marked winding key. Request Price Special Packaging

According to Andy Demeter, author of "Chelsea Clock Company The First Hundred Years," 2001, Demeter Publications Ltd., Chelsea, Mass., on page 202, Chelsea first produced this design as the "Yacht Wheel Clock" in 1906. In 1928 the model name was changed to the "Mariner." The Mariner line was discontinued in 1984.

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.

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