West Sea Company

13. Clocks & Chronometers

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN

 


 


13.33   SWISS CHRONOMETER.  State-of-the-art marine timekeeper by one of the world’s acknowledged pioneer makers, “ULYSEE NARDIN, Locle, Suisse 5488” as engraved on the perfect silvered brass dial.  This handsome 2-day machine has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by black spade hands.  The large subsidiary seconds bit over the VI shows single seconds marked by 10’s.  At the top of the dial, astride the XII, the Up/Down indicator reads from 0 – 56 hours, marked in 8 hour increments with the notations “UP/HAUT” and “DOWN/BAS.”  The dial is encircled by the silver reflector ring protected under the beveled glass crystal set into the knurled brass bezel.  The chronometer is housed in its solid brass bowl slung in gimbals.  The condition of both is remarkably pristine in their original lacquered surfaces.  The box contains the gimbal lock on the right front and the original ratcheted winding key at the right rear.  The chronometer movement itself is in equally pristine original condition.  The lovely gold-washed brass plates are spotless!  The top plate is stamped with the maker’s trademark of the sun and a pine tree and the name “ULYSEE NARDIN LOCLE” along with the serial number “5488.”  The bi-metallic balance has a helical Palladium hairspring, 6 large timing weights and the balance cock with a diamond end stone.  The spring détente escapement is driven by the chain-drive fusee.  Of particular note is the fact that the balance is equipped with a rare pivoting stop which is cleverly-designed to capture one of the timing weights when engaged.  This feature in lieu of "corking" the movement for shipping.  Of even more significance is the fact that this chronometer was designed with a break circuit feature to provide an important input for hydrographic surveys and other time sensitive operations.   It is housed in its original solid mahogany, three tier brass-bound box.  The upper lid bears an inlaid brass shield in the top.  The middle tier has a push button latch in a star burst escutcheon.  Below it is an inlaid rectangular Bakelite panel.  The lower box has an inlaid starburst escutcheon for the box lock and inlaid folding brass drop handles on each side.  The original skeleton key is cleverly housed in a slot in the upper lid.  Certainly one of the finest, state-of-the-art chronometers ever made, it measures 7 inches square by 7 inches high.  Condition, in a word, is “fantastic.”  Just fully overhauled by one of the world’s remaining “old school” chronometer makers in England.Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top 

The firm’s namesake, Ulysee Nardin (1823-1876), began business in 1846 making pocket chronometers and high grade pocket watches.  Ulysee’s son, Paul began to produce chronometers in 1875, winning many prize awards for his output.  The grandsons, Raymond and Claude Nardin carried on the firm well into the 20th century.  Number 5488 is shown to have been made in 1944.  (Tony Mercer, “Chronometer Makers of the World,” 1991, NAG Press, Colchester, England.)

In the unprecedented effort to mass produce marine chronometers for America’s anticipated entry into World War II, the Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster, Pennsylvania chose the Ulysee Nardin chronometer as THE example by which to pattern its prototype.  Amazingly, Hamilton, which had never made a full size marine chronometer before, ended up producing the crown jewel of modern chronometers embodied in its Hamilton model 21.


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13.32  IMPORTANT CHRONOMETER.  Most desirable 2-day marine chronometer by one of England’s finest and most revered horologists.  This is John Edward Dent marine chronometer number 1590 as signed on the silvered brass dial “DENT LONDON 82 Strand No. 1590” and again on the porcelainized nameplate on the front of the box, “DENT 1590.”  The immaculate dial, unusually large for this type of configuration, features bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by delicate blued steel hands.  The subsidiary second bit is below XII and indicates 0 – 56 hours with the unusual additional markings of “UP, WIND, 2 DAYS, and DOWN.”  It is protected by the early form domed glass crystal with thin brass bezel. The movement is housed in its gimbaled brass bowl with locking lever at the left rear and original ratcheted winding key, twice marked “1590,” on the right.  The magnificent all brass movement is a thing of beauty, with decoratively-spotted shiny brass plates, turned brass pillars, large bi-metallic balance with early form pie-shaped segmental timing weights, blued steel helical hairspring, diamond end stone in the balance cock, highly blued steel parts, spring détente escapement, and of course a chain drive fusee.  The inside of the bowl is stamped “DENT” and “1590.”  The exterior bottom of the bowl exhibits a very unique dust cover over the winding arbor.  It consists of a spring-loaded lever with cap covering the aperture.  This is a much more complex feature over the typical rotating disc found on virtually all other chronometers.  The simple crotch grain African mahogany box is indicative of early 1800’s chronometers.  It has folding drop handles on each side and an inlaid brass key escutcheon in addition to the previously mentioned maker’s plaque.  This extremely rare navigational timepiece measures a diminutive 6 ¼ inches cubed.  The unusually large dial measures 4 inches in diameter.  Absolutely outstanding condition in all respects.  It is a strong runner and is virtually perfect cosmetically.  Circa 1842.  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

Edward John Dent (1790-1853) was certainly one of the preeminent English horologers in the first half of the 1800’s.  During his very productive life he set up a large number of factories and workshops turning out his inventions and products.  According to Tony Mercer in “Chronometer Makers of the World,” Dent began his business career in 1814 at 64 the Strand and 28 Cockspur Street in London.  He moved to 84 the Strand in 1840.   In 1828 his chronometer No. 114 won the Premium Trails at Greenwich.  This fact caught the eye of pioneer chronometer maker John Roger Arnold who took Dent in as a partner in 1830.  The chronometer making partnership lasted 10 years.  Following their partnership Dent moved to 84 the Strand in 1840.  A number of Dent’s chronometers accompanied famous expeditions to both Polar regions and the tropics.   No. 1800 accompanied David Livingston during his African explorations.  In 1841 Dent was granted the Royal Warrant as “Chronometer Maker to the Queen and the Prince of Wales.“   Among his achievements beyond chronometer making, Dent was the maker of the famous “Big Ben” Parliamentary tower clock in London.  He designed and produced a very early form of aneroid barometer (without liquid) which revolutionized barometers at sea.  He also invented and produced his patented depleioscope which used the sun’s rays to determine local apparent noon for the purpose of accurately setting of watches.

In his monumental biography of E. J. Dent, Vaudrey Mercer, author of “Edward John Dent and His Successors,” 1977, The Antiquarian Horological Society, Church Hill, Ramsgate, England  indicates Dent Marine Chronometer No. 1581 as dating 1841.  Then bracketing Dent Marine Chronometer No. 1600 is dated at 1842.


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5.22/13.32 CHRONOMETER WATCH. World War II vintage American deck watch made for the U.S. Navy by the "Hamilton Lancaster, PA., U.S.A." as marked on the white enameled dial. It features blued steel spade hands with Arabic numerals, minute chapter and an individually marked seconds bit at the "6" o'clock position. A 56 hour winding indicator just below the "12" indicates "Up/Down," marked in 8 hour increments from "8-48." This finest quality ship's time keeper is embodied in a state-of-the-art 35 size, 21 jewel movement with lever escapement. The damascened nickel-plated brass movement is a thing of beauty. It is engraved, "Hamilton Watch Co. Model 22-21 jewels Adj. to Temp 6 Pos. Made in U.S.A. U.S. Navy Bu Ships-1942." It is contained within its heavy, solid brass tub with substantial brass counterweight, suspended in gimbals. The bottom is engraved “MTD, WATCH BUREAU OF SHIPS U.S. NAVY (N) 8201-1941.” The bezel and the side of the chronometer tub are marked with the matching serial number, “8201.” The gimbal assembly functions properly and may be locked by a thumbscrew and lever inside the box. The 3-tier solid mahogany box has a glazed middle section with solid wood lid cover. Both are hinged with clever box lid stops to hold the upper portion in place when opened. Each contains a brass button latch which opens and closes easily providing a secure closure. The front bears the nickeled brass maker's plaque reading, "Hamilton Watch Co. Lancaster, PA., U.S.A." The interior has an old paper label from Northwest Instruments Co., Seattle with a repair date of “Feb 1954.” The entire unit is in remarkable condition, save for a couple of minor scratches on the inner lid. The watch is an excellent timekeeper having just been professionally serviced by a certified AWI watchmaker and is in top running condition. Making this presentation all the more desirable, it is housed within the outer protective carrying case with original leather strap. The front of the outer box also bears a Hamilton maker's plaque and is complete with hook and eye closure. The outer box is in absolutely pristine condition. Price Request

Marvin Whitney, author of "The Ship's Chronometer," 1985, AWI Press, Cincinnati, Ohio writes on page 201, "This 35 size, high quality, 21-jeweled movement is an instrument of great beauty, precision, and endurance. Anyone owning one of these fine timepieces has every reason to be proud of this possession."

In his second book on the topic of Chronometers, Whitney authored "Military Timepieces," 1992, AWI Press, Cincinnati, Ohio (see West Sea Co. item 7.11). On pages 396-7 he writes, "These beautifully designed watches were truly remarkable timepieces, the performance of which was outstanding. The two design features which contributed most to the superior performance of their chronometer watch were: 1) the unusually long mainspring, and 2) the design and construction of the balance assembly with unique biaxial thermal expansion rim of 18% nickel silver, invar arm and Hamilton Elinvar hairspring."



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13.28 WWI U.S. SHIPPING BOARD CLOCK. Finest quality 1918 or earlier ship’s bulkhead clock made for the United States Shipping Board by the venerable Seth Thomas Clock Company as signed at the bottom of the dial “Made By Seth Thomas in U.S.A.” The silvered brass dial has Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by black spade hands. A subsidiary seconds bit is just below XII. It indicates single seconds marked by 10’s. The original silvered reflector ring encompasses the dial. It has a glazed heavy bezel which screws on and off with ease. It in turn fits the solid brass case with classic flared ship’s clock mounting flange. The all brass movement is Seth Thomas’ finest, with 7 jewel lever escapement running for 8 days. 5 ¾ inches in diameter and 2 ½ inches thick. Lovely old cosmetic condition and an excellent time keeper. Over 100 years old! Complete with period winding key marked “TAYLOR.” SOLD


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13.27 VERY RARE FRENCH CHRONOMETER. Exceptional mid-19th century 2-day marine chronometer by the noted French maker Onesime Dumas as beautifully engraved in cursive script on the uniquely French silvered dial, “Dumas Suc de Gannery a St. Nicholas pres Dieppe No 257.” Nothing short of a piece of art, this lovely creation has many features not seen on most chronometers of the era. It has bold Roman numeral and a minute chapter ring swept by exceptionally delicate solid gold Breguet moon hands. The unique pie-shaped winding indicator below the XII is calibrated from 0 – 40 hours, indicated by a long gold hand. A subsidiary seconds bit is over the VI and is calibrated in single seconds marked by 10’s. The silvered reflector ring is in ogee form protected by thick beveled glass. The brass bezel is smooth, not knurled. The diminutive movement is all brass with decoratively engine-turned spotted pates top and bottom. The balance cock sports a diamond end stone supporting the bi-metallic with 6 timing weights and a blued steel helical hairspring. It has a footed spring détente escapement and a chain drive fusee. The movement is signed in delicate, flourishing script at the base of the balance cock, “Dumas No. 257.” All of this is fitted into the heavily counterbalanced brass tub with circular spring-loaded winding dust cover on the bottom. This in turn is slung in a large grass gimbal supported on U-shaped brass suspensions which flex and act as shock absorbers! SOLD Back to Top

The unique gimbal lock in the left rear left pivots to engage the gimbal as well as the tub, making both fast when in place. On the right rear is the petite ratcheted winding key of superlative design and function. All this is housed in the handsome 3-tier solid rosewood box fitted with folding brass drop handles on each side. The lid has brass corners and an inlaid blank ivory plaque on the top. It protects the glazed middle tier which bears the inlaid ivory disc reading “DUMAS 257.” The lower tier is complete with an inlaid ivory shield and push button latch. The bottom of the box has an unusual wider “skirt.” It measures 6 ¾ inches square, while the box itself is 6 ½ inches square by 6 inches high. The condition of all components is absolutely outstanding in every respect. This chronometer is a strong runner and keeps accurate time.

Onesime Dumas (1824-1889) was the nephew and apprentice of the famous French horologer Henri Motel.  In 1851 he took over Victor Gannery’s business.  His number 135, dating 1851, was signed Sucr (successor) du Gannery as is this example.  His number 1034 is dated at 1870.  It is therefore very likely this machine dates circa 1855.  (Tony Mercer, “Chronometer Makers of the World,” 1991, N.A.G. Press, Colchester, England).

Interestingly the gimbal ring is beautifully hand-engraved on its periphery with the inscription “Houghton Farm, Tuesday June 6th, 1876.”



 


13.26 EIGHT DAY CHRONOMETER. Truly magnificent antique American marine chronometer with the rare and highly desirable feature of running for 8 days. This massive machine has a perfect silvered brass dial engraved “JOHN BLISS & CO. New York No. 3230.” It has bold Roman numerals, a minute chapter ring swept by delicate blued steel spade hands and a large subsidiary seconds bit over the VI indicating single seconds marked by 10’s. Below XII is the Up/Down winding indicator marked 0 – 8 (days). The dial is protected by a heavy knurled brass bezel with silvered reflector ring fitted with beveled glass. The huge, long running movement is all brass with beautifully engine-turned spotted plates. It has eleven jewels including a prominent diamond end stone on the balance cock. The bi-metallic balance with helical Palladium hairspring has large timing weights and is fitted with Kullberg’s auxiliary temperature compensation. The movement is of the spring détente type with Kullberg’s distinctive reversed chain drive fusee. One of the plates is stamped “9098.” Of interesting note is the semi-circular brass “shield” surrounding the delicate balance to minimize damage to it should the chain or spring barrel let go. This is all housed in the virtually perfect brass bowl in its original lacquered finish, also stamped “9098.” The bowl is slung in gimbals with gimbal lock, suspended in its rich, fully brass-bound tight-grained mahogany box. The top lid hinges back to reveal the glazed covering of the middle tier which has a star burst button latch on the front. Below the latch is a lovely mother-of-pearl plaque engraved “JOHN BLISS & CO. 323O NEW YORK.” The bottom tier holds the chronometer, the original ratcheted winding key marked “BLISS 3230” and the box lock with original skeleton key. The sides of the box are inlaid with tight, flush-folding handles. The box measures 8 ¼ inches square and stands 9 inches high. The condition of the entire presentation is nothing short of fantastic. Its excellent condition cannot be overstated. Having been in this business for nearly 40 years, with marine chronometers as a specialty, we can truly say this is the finest example, in terms of its pristine original condition, that we have ever offered. Amazing considering it is over 100 years old! Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

According to Tony Mercer in “Chronometer Makers of the World,” 1991, N.A.G. Press, Colchester, England, this chronometer, movement number 9098 was made by Victor Kullberg in 1916. Kullberg was regarded as THE premier English chronometer maker at the turn-of-the-last century. Mercer describes him on page 7 as “One of the most brilliant and prolific makers of chronometers and movements during the 19th-20th century. Born is Sweden, he came to work in London in 1851.” His machines consistently out performed those of his contemporaries. Between 1864 and 1914 his chronometers won the Greenwich Chronometer Trials an unprecedented 23 times! (Rupert Gould, “The Marine Chronometer,” 1923, The Holland Press, Ltd., pages 265-266). Kullberg’s movements stood out amongst the rest because of their highly finished appearance, Kullberg’s almost unique use of the reversed (proper) fusee and their superlative timekeeping abilities.

John Bliss & Co. were at 128 Front Street, New York from 1880-1929. The elder Bliss began work in 1837 partnering with William Creighton to form the chronometer making firm of Bliss and Creighton which lasted until 1855. The elder Bliss died in 1857 whereupon his sons carried on the business. Apparently not chronometer makers themselves, the duo imported and sold chronometers to the U.S. Navy. Their chronometers placed 3rd, 6th and 8th at the Washington Observatory trials of 1886. Mercer lists a large number of Bliss chronometers beginning in 1882, all of which bore Kullberg movements. He lists Kullberg bracketing numbers 9074-9200 as dating to 1916.


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10.53/13.23 WORLD WAR I U-BOAT CLOCK. Incredibly rare! Absolutely museum-quality. Identified conning tower timepiece from the German submarine U-80, surrendered to the British upon the cessation of hostilities of World War I. In testament to this the display bears the engraved brass plaque reading “CLOCK FROM U.B. 80. SURRENDERED AT HARWICH 28. NOV. 1918.” This handsome clock has a large silvered brass dial with bold Roman numerals and minute chapter swept by black spade hands. The subsidiary seconds bit is below the XII and is calibrated in single seconds marked in Arabic numerals at 15 second intervals. The lovely dial bears an engraved crown over the letter “M” and bears serial number “3835.” It is signed “F. N Tietz Kiel” below the winding arbor. It is protected by a heavy brass bezel with beveled glass. The bezel hinges on the left, locking and opening with the brass winding key on the right. The solid brass case houses a jeweled brass movement of great beauty. It features lever escapement on a detached nickel platform. The backplate is marked with the charming maker’s trademark of a winged hour glass atop the orb of the earth. Several of the components are serial numbered – all matching. The brass case is tapered front to back mounting on a Bakelite disc 9 5/8 inches in diameter. The disc is mounted on trunnions in between two turned wood, ivory and brass supporting columns 6 ½ inches tall. These in turn are attached to the think rectangular Bakelite base on brass bun feet. The base measures 14 inches wide by 7 inches deep and is 1 inches thick. This impressive presentation stands 10 ¾ inches tall and weighs a substantial 12 pounds. Outstanding original condition. The clock is a very good timekeeper, running for 8 days on a single wind. Complete with period brass winding key. Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

In an auction entitled "War Medals, Orders and Decoorations" conducted by Sotheby's, London on November 23, 2017, the following information accompanied lot 189 (printed here verbatim): "Remaining a part of Lieutenant Auten’s trusted crew aboard H.M.S. STOCKFORCE on 15 December 1917, and now as a Leading Seaman, he took part  in the famous ‘V.C.  Action’  against  the  German  U-Boat  UB-80 on  30  July  1918,  for  which  Lieutenant  Auten won his Victoria Cross.  STACKFORCE was struck by a torpedo to the forward bulkhead, causing tremendous damage. As she settled in the water, and after the ‘panic party’ was launched to her boats, UB-80 was eventually drawn closer by the returning boats to just 300 yards away from STOCKFORCE’s port beam.  Opening fire at 5:40 P.M. her revealed guns swiftly carried away one periscope, destroyed the conning tower, and ripped a hole in the U-Boat’s hull, continuing to fire as she rapidly sank stern first below the waves.  STOCKFORCE remained afloat until 9:25 P.M., but eventually sank with her white ensign still flying – her crew having been safely evacuated. For this action Lieutenant Auten was awarded the Victoria Cross, and for his part, Leading Seaman Cunningham was awarded the D.S.M.” (Our sincere thanks to our long time customer Barry Bock for providing this bit of history).

A number of U-boats were surrendered to the British Government by the German Navy as required by the terms of the Armistice signed in the Hague on the famous date of 11-11-18, now observed as Veteran’s Day or Armistice Day in many countries. The date of surrender of U-80 comes just weeks later. Of those turned over to the Brits, all were scrapped as they were deemed useless in the prosecution of British Naval tactics at the time.

"F. N. Tiez, Kiel" was Johann Friedrich Nicolaus Tiez (1843-1931) a clock maker in Tiel, Northern Germany, made in the manner of the famous German clockmaker Gustov Becker (1819-1885), the famous German clockmaker form Silesia located in the German Empire, now part of Poland.

Sincere thanks to Florian Fugemann, Vienna, Austria, author of an upcoming book on timepieces used on German warships in World War I.



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13.50  CARVED WALL COMPENDIUM.  Very handsome 4th quarter of the 19th century English clock and weather station contained within an ornately-carved hardwood wall mount case.  This decorative high quality instrument has three indicators.  At the top is an 8 day clock equipped with an all brass jeweled movement with a scarce cylinder escapement.  It is set in a brass bezel with beveled glass crystal.  The wind and set function are made from the back with the original double-ended brass key.  The middle instrument consists of a lovely mercury thermometer with large bulb reading from 20 to 152 degrees Fahrenheit.  The silvered brass scale is marked with the traditional indicators, “FREEZING, TEMPERATE, SUMr HEAT, and BLOOD HEAT” and is mounted within a shaped wooden frame covered by glass.  The bottom is graced by a high quality aneroid barometer having a white dial with an especially large range -- reading from 26.7 to 32.3 inches of mercury in 2/100ths increments.  It too is marked with the traditional weather indicators “STORMY, RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR and VERY DRY.”  It is also marked with the weather trends such as “FALL for S.Wly. S.E. S.W.” and “RISE for N.E.ly. N.W. N.E.” etc.   A fine steel indicator needle points the reading and a second brass set needle attached to a knurled knob indicates change from the previous reading.   The set needle is rove through the beveled glass crystal housed in its brass bezel.   21 ¼ inches tall by 7 ¾ inches wide at the widest and 2 ¾ inches thick.  The entire presentation is in an excellent state of original preservation.  All three functions work properly and accurately.  The clock is a good timekeeper.  WAS 1495  NOW half off!  749


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 13.38  SHIP’s ENGINEROOM CLOCK.  Most impressive late 19th century American ship’s clock with the large silvered brass dial fancily-engraved “The Ashton Valve Co., Boston, Mass.”  It has bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by black spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit below the “12” is divided into 5 second intervals marked in 15’s.  Just below the “6” the dial is signed and dated, “S.T. 1891.”  The huge case houses its all brass No. 10 movement produced by the venerable Seth Thomas Company.  It is in fabulous original condition.  The back plate is stamped with the Seth Thomas trademark of “ST” within a diamond.  Below, it is further marked “SETH THOMAS THOMASTON, CONN.”  Then “MADE IN U.S. AMERICA.”  The massive ship’s clock case is of solid rose bronze with a flared bezel and thick mounting flange 10 3/4 inches in diameter.  The case is 3 ¾ inches thick and weighs an amazing 16 pounds!  For ease of winding and setting it is equipped with a hinged bezel opening and closing on an elaborate brass button latch.  The bezel contains its original old wavy glass held in by traditional plaster of Paris.  This clock is in unbelievably beautiful cosmetic condition for its age.  It is a strong runner on double spring barrels and keeps good time.  Complete with original winding key.  Simply a great American ship’s clock!    Price Request Special Packaging


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13.09  EARLY SHIP BUILDER’s CLOCK.   Here is an original American ship’s clock well over 100 years old!  The silvered brass dial is deeply engraved “THE PUSEY & JONES CO., WILMINGTON, DEL.”  Below the winding arbor is a shield stamped “The Ashcroft Mfg. Co.  New York REG U.S. PAT OFF.”   The dial has bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by Breguet-type “moon” hands.  The movement is Chelsea’s earliest time only jeweled brass movement with decoratively-engraved balance cocks.   The serial number 58XXX* dates this clock to 1909.   It is housed in its original handsome solid bronze steam gauge-type case 10 inches in diameter by 2 ¾ inches deep and weighs a hefty 9 pounds!  The bezel is conveniently hinged, closing on a lock having its original skeleton key.  Excellent untouched condition showing its great age.  This clock is a good time keeper and comes with a period winding key.  975

The Pusey & Jones Company was a major shipbuilder and industrial equipment manufacturer from 1848 to 1959.  The primary output of the company was shipbuilding from 1853 until the end of World War II.   During that timeframe the yard built more than 500 ships, from large cargo vessels to small warships and yachts, including VOLUNTEER, winner of the 1887 America’s Cup.

In 1848 Joshua Pusey and John Jones formed their partnership in Wilmington, Delaware, operating a machine shop in space rented from a whaling company.  By 1854 they had built the first iron-hulled sailing vessel ever  made in the U.S, the schooner MAHLON BETTS.   At the beginning of the Civil War the company began building vessels for the U.S. Navy.  The first was a sloop of war.  Wartime business boomed and the Pusey & Jones Company expanded dramatically.  Business continued to flourish through the end of the century as America became a major maritime power.

During World War I, the firm had more than 2,000 employees.  A second shipyard, called The Pennsylvania Shipbuilding Company was added in Gloucester City, New Jersey, but was soon  renamed Pusey & Jones.  The yard produced 19 ships before closing at War’s end.

During the slump of the late 1920’s and 30’s, the company reorganized, turning its production to building  luxury steam and motor yachts for wealthy patrons.

As World War II approached, government contracts increased.  At its peak Pusey & Jones employed  more than 3,600  workers.   At that time the company was producing C1 type cargo ships for the U.S. Maritime Commission.   Pusey & Jones launched one of the very first Liberty Ships.   The yard also produced minesweepers and many other specialty vessels.  In additional, commercial and private vessels originally built by the company were also converted for wartime use.

After the War, Pusey and Jones tooled up to manufacture papermaking machinery.  It closed its doors 1959.

Some of the more notable vessels the company launched and provided machinery for were:
Steamboat GAY HEAD
U.S.L.H. Service ship NANTUCKET
U.S.L.H. Service ship PORTSMOUTH
U.S.C.G. Cutter MOHAWK
USS INDIANAPOLIS (ID-3865)
Steamboat T. J. POTTER
Plus scores of U.S. NAVY commissioned vessels


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13.06  8 DAY CHRONOMETER.  Early 1900’s deck watch made by the esteemed Swiss makers “Zenith” as marked on the enameled brass dial “ZENITH CHRONOMETER.”  The dial has bold Arabic numerals swept by blued steel spade hands over a minute chapter.   There is a subsidiary seconds bit  over the 6 o’clock position and an 8 day up/down indicator below the 12.  The high quality all brass movement  is a thing of beauty with engine turnings on the plate.  The high grade lever escapement has 17 jewels.  It is stem wound and set.  The dial is perfect, as is the convex crystal.  The entire unit is housed in its brass gimbal with locking lever in its lovely original all mahogany classic chronometer 3 tier mahogany box.  The dial measures 2 ¼ inches in diameter.  The box is essentially 5 inches cubed.  Outstanding original cosmetic condition throughout.  The movement is in perfect working order and is an excellent time keeper.  Price Request Special Packaging

The movement of this deck watch was made by the Zenith Company of Switzerland for the U.S. government upon the latter’s entry into World War I, as indicated “U.S.A” on the movement.  Zenith, founded in 1865, maintains a quality production of mechanical watches to this day.


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13.75 CAPTAIN's CABIN CLOCK and BAROMETER SET. Genuine 19th century ship's clock and barometer set consisting of a handsome 9 inch diameter clock together with a 9 1/2 inch diameter barometer/thermometer -- both in beautiful "rope" carved wooden cases. The quality clock has a white enameled zinc dial, bold Roman numerals, steel spade hands, large inset seconds bit and two winding arbors. The hinged brass bezel opens and closes with a press fit affording easy access for winding and setting. The all brass 8-day movement is stamped "Ansonia Clock Co., U.S.A." and keeps good time, having just been professionally serviced. The back of the clock case bears the remnants of the old Ansonia label. The equally handsome barometer has an ornate white dial calibrated in inches from 27.8 to 31.2 in 2/100th increments and bears the standard weather indications "STORMY, RAIN, FAIR,' etc. Below is a curved mercury thermometer calibrated in both Fahrenheit and Centigrade. The barometer bears a large black indicator needle overlain by a brass "set" needle attached to a knurled brass knob. The dial is protected by its original thick beveled glass crystal set in a brass bezel. Both the barometer and thermometer function properly. Telling of this set's use aboard ship, both the clock and barometer have their original brass hanging brackets at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions to firmly secure them to the bulkhead. In addition, the barometer has wind indications marked on its dial, as expected of an instrument used at sea. This is a very elegant 19th century set that likely graced a Captain's cabin. Price Request


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13.76

13.76  U.S. NAVY DECK CLOCK.  Genuine World War II vintage ship’s clock made for the U.S. Navy by the Chelsea Clock Co.  The black composition dial is signed “MARK I DECK CLOCK, U.S. NAVY DECK CLOCK (N) 50262 CHELSEA”. This beautiful ship’s timepiece has bold Arabic numbers, white spade hands, a minute chapter, and seconds bit below the “12.”   It is the Navy’s classic “backwind” bulkhead deck clock with Bakelite case and convex crystal.  A knurled thumbscrew on the right secures the back to the mounting flange on a watertight O-ring. The clock body opens forward on a bronze hinge exposing the back which has 5 apertures.  They are: Fast/Slow, Winding, Set, and Stop. This latter feature is unique in that it actually allows the clock to be set to the exact second without stopping the movement -- necessary in coordinating fleet movements, shore bombardment and amphibious assaults.  A 5th aperture is a small button which covers the openings when not in use. The mechanism is Chelsea’s finest quality 11 jewel movement with solid brass components featuring a bi-metallic balance and lever escapement.  The backplate is marked, “CHELSEA CLOCK CO., BOSTON U.S.A.” and is serial numbered XXXXXX* dating it precisely to April 14, 1944.   As configured, the sturdy Bakelite case can also be removed from the hinged bulkhead mounting plate.  The clock is a precise timekeeper in fine, original cosmetic condition.  5 ½ inch dial and 8 ½ inches in diameter overall. Complete with original “Chelsea” marked winding key.   795


* For the privacy and security of the purchaser the serial number of this clock is being withheld.


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13.99   WW I TORPEDO BOAT CHRONOMETER WATCH.  Rare marine chronometer watch manufactured by the highly respected Swiss firm of "LONGINES, SWISS" as marked on the perfect silvered dial.  This large timekeeper in pocket watch format features a snap fit bezel with glass crystal covering a bold Roman numeral dial.  The pristine dial has a minute chapter and inset seconds bit at the bottom with a 36 hour Up/Down below XII.  The double hinged back cover is stamped "0.800" fine silver and opens to reveal the exceptional 17 jewel movement with decoratively damascened plates.  It is stem wound, stem set, with a lever escapement and compensated balance.  The movement is signed, "17 JEWELS ADJ. LONGINES Co. Swiss."  This high grade deck watch is housed in its original satin-lined mahogany inner box with splined construction and brass closures.  As a collectible, what is exceptional is the fact that it is complete with its outside carrying box with padded green felt interior and original leather carrying strap.   The watch itself has a dial 2 ¼ inches in diameter.  The solid silver case is 2 ¾ inches in diameter and 3 ¾ inches high inclusive of the bow.  The inner case measures 5 by 6 by 2 1/8 inches.  The outer case is 9 ¼ inches wide, 8 ½ inches long and 6 inches high overall.  The entire offering is in beautiful original condition and the watch is an excellent timekeeper.   Price Request

According to Marvin Whitney, esteemed author of "Military Timepieces," 1992 American Watchmakers Institute Press, the Longines deck watch was introduced to the U.S. Navy in 1904. It was often referred to by other world navies as a "deck or chronometer watch or compteur." Whitney describes it on page 295 as, "Caliber 21.29, 17 jewels, 36 hours, bimetallic balance, cam regulator, silver case."

This item comes form the prestigious collection of a very well known Admiralty Law lawyer who for years only collected the best examples of important maritime-related artifacts.

Several weeks ago a similar watch with a scratch on the dial was offered on eBay.  It had a plain brass case minus the outer carrying case!  The "Buy It Now" price was $4,750. Item 400981457331.


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13.88  MINT CHELSEA CLOCK.  An amazing find!  Offered here is an older large Chelsea ship’s bell clock in unused, factory mint condition -- still in its original presentation box!  This is an 8 ½ dial ship’s bell clock featuring a silvered brass dial with large Arabic numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by Breguet-style blued steel “moon” hands.  The dial is marked “CHELSEA SHIP’S BELL” between the two winding arbors and the Fast/Slow micrometer adjustment is at the 9 o’clock position.  It is complete with the silvered brass (not plastic) reflector ring encircling the dial.  The high quality 11 jewel movement is Chelsea’s finest quality all brass ship’s bell type with lever escapement made in America. The massive brass case is of the classic ship’s clock type with flared bezel, hinged on the right, opening and closing with a button latch on the left.   The case number XXXXXX* matches the movement number, dating the clock to the early 1990’s.  The case measures 10 1/8 inches in diameter on the bezel, 10 ½ inches wide on the mounting flange and is 4 inches deep.   This clock comes complete in its original box with felt-covered foam rubber padding measuring 12 ½ by 14 inches and 5 ½ inches thick.  The entire presentation weighs nearly 19 pounds!  Complete with original Chelsea-marked winding key.  Price Request

*  For the privacy of the ultimate purchaser the serial number is being withheld.

The Chelsea Company website offers a new 8 ½ inch ship’s bell clock for the reduced” price of $3,230.00.


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13.69  ENGLISH CHRONOMETER.  Elegant 3rd quarter  19th century 2-day marine timekeeper by the respected nautical instrument maker “JOSEPH SEWILL 61 South Castle STRT  LIVERPOOL.” as prominently engraved on the silvered brass dial.  It is additionally marked in fancy script, “Maker to the Admiralty” and number “4030” within the extra large seconds bit over the 6 o’clock position.  The especially handsome dial is adorned with 2 prize medal emblems from 1862 and the International Exhibition of 1867.  Both are accentuated in red, as is the address “30 Cornhill London.”  The 12 hour dial  features bold Roman numerals with a minute chapter marked in 5’s, swept by solid gold spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit is sub-divided into single seconds marked by 10’s.  The 56 hour Up/Down indicator is located below the “XII.”  The dial is covered by the beveled glass crystal set in a heavy brass bezel with silvered reflector ring.  It is housed in its solid brass bowl with rotating winding dust cover on the bottom, slung in gimbals with  knurled gimbal lock.  The particularly lovely all brass movement with diamond end stone and blued steel screws exhibits highly polished plates with decorative engine turning.  The large compensated bi-metallic balance has a blued steel helical hair spring, a spring détente escapement and a chain drive fusee.  Both the tub and the back plate are stamped with the serial number “2297” indicating it was one of Sewill’s earlier movements, circa 1868, ultimately finished and sold by his son, John.  This would explain the placing of the 1867 medallion on the dial and the addition of the later 30 Cornhill address within the seconds bit.  The entire assembly is housed in its exquisite, fully brass-bound box of solid rosewood with brass furniture.  The box measures 7 ¼ inches cubed and the dial is 4 inches in diameter, sight.  Complete with its original ratcheted chronometer winding key.  Excellent original condition in all respects and an excellent time keeper.  SOLD

Born in 1800, Joseph Sewill began his business at 8 Duncan Street, Liverpool in 1839 under the name “Sewall.”  In 1845 he moved to 61 South Castle Street.  He maintained this business address until his death in 1876.  Sewill was a maker to the Royal Navy and the Queen of Spain.  He patented his own auxiliary compensation and was awarded the top prize at the Greenwich Trials in 1874.  Sewill was known to have made watches, chronometers, barometers and sextants.  His sons, John and Frank, carried on the firm name until 1905.  (Tony Mercer, “Chronometer Makers of the World,” 1991, NAG Press, Clerkenwell, London, p. 236).   John established a branch office at in London at 30 Cornhill in 1875.


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13.62  IMPORTANT CHRONOMETER.   Most rare navigational timepiece made  by the  pioneer English makers at the time when chronometer making was still in its infancy.  This incredible 2-day example was made by the venerable partnership of William Parkinson and William James Frodsham, begun in 1801 and actually dates to only a year later – 1802!  The diminutive navigational timekeeper has a silvered brass dial beautifully hand-engraved with the makers’ signatures “Parkinson & Frodsham Change Alley London 122” amidst flourishes.  The dial has bold Roman numerals and a minute chapter marked in 5 minute intervals swept by blued steel spade hands.  A subsidiary seconds bit is above the VI position with a fine blued steel needle hand.   Indicative of its early origin, it has no Up/Down indicator – a feature which came some 20 years later on chronometers produced by these makers. The dial is protected by its classic early form convex crystal.  The squared tub with rotating dust cover on the bottom is slung in gimbals in its unusually small box with gimbal lock and ratcheted winding key.   The movement is housed in Frodsham’s “signature” inner dust cover.  It is absolutely a thing of beauty with its diamond end stone,  blued steel helical hairspring, large compensated balance with early-form segmental pie-shaped weights and beautifully engraved brass top plate with the signature “Parkinson & Frodsham, Change Alley, London, No. 122.”  The exceptionally small plain mahogany box, indicative of this early period, has all brass furniture and is complete with its original box skeleton key and old style folding brass drop handles.  Telling of its early origins it has a felt-lined dust strip surrounding the precious mechanism.  The front of the chronometer box is inlaid with the matching ivory nameplate “122.”  5 ¼ inches square and only 5 ½ inches high – smaller than most deck watches!  Lovely original condition.  The movement has just been thoroughly serviced in England by a former employee of the Mercer Company of chronometer fame and is guaranteed to be in tip top running condition.  The box and all components are original.  An amazing surviving relic from the early days of sail, worthy of the finest museum! SOLD


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13.82  CLOCK and BAROMETER SET.  Charming, near miniature clock and matching barometer pair made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Co. of Boston.  This matched set is absolutely of the finest quality to be found.   Known as the "Manhattan" model it consists of Chelsea's high grade, jeweled time only clock having a silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals and blued steel spade hands.  With a serial number of XXXXXX* this set can be dated to precisely to November 9, 1939. The matching barometer, made by Paul Naudet of Paris is marked "Made In France PNHB Compensated, Holosteric Barometer."  It features a very high quality movement with an open face silvered dial calibrated in inches of mercury from 27.7 to 31.3 in 5/100th increments. It bears the standard weather indications, "RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR," etc. and is equipped with a delicate blued steel indicator needle and a brass set needle attached to a knurled knob running through the crystal. The bottom of the dial is fitted with a gracefully curving Fahrenheit thermometer calibrated in 2 degree increments from -6 degrees to 156! Both units are housed in their original heavy solid brass cases with10 decorative ship wheel "spokes" and knurled screw-on bezels. Each unit measures 4 3/4 inches in diameter overall with a 3 3/4 inch diameter mounting flange. The dials are 2 5/8ths inches across each.  The 8 day clock is a good timekeeper and is complete with the original Chelsea-marked winding key.  The barometer/thermometer functions are working and accurate. Outstanding cosmetic condition throughout!   Request Price

According to Andy Demeter in his book "Chelsea Clock Company The First 100 Years," 2001, David D. and Andrew C. Demeter, Chelsea, Massachusetts, the Manhattan set was, "introduced in 1937 for suggested use on motor boat instrument boards. These matching clock and barometer/thermometer models were available individually or as a set. This pair is essentially the Viking model with the addition of spokes around their circumference and like the Viking set, the Manhattan enjoyed a long life on the production line."

*For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.


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13.41 CLOCK / BAROMETER/THERMOMETER  SET.   Extremely attractive, very scarce turn-of the 1900’s, genuine ship Captain’s cabin presentation featuring a high quality clock, barometer and thermometer mounted in a heavy, superbly-carved solid mahogany mount with a classic ropework border.  This set consists of 3 instruments.  The left side is an aneroid barometer reading atmospheric pressure from 26.5 inches of mercury to 31.5, calibrated by 2/100th inch increments.  The fancy Victorian dial is marked with the standard weather indications “Stormy, RAIN, Change, FAIR, Very Dry” with explanations on foretelling the weather by “RISES” and “FALLS.”  It is signed “Simpson Lawrence Co., Glasgow.”  The fine blackened steel indicator needle is overlaid by the brass set needle which is connected to a knurled brass knob rove through the beveled glass crystal in its brass bezel.  The center item is a mercury thermometer calibrated from 0 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit in 2 degree increments.  The clock function is of the very highest order, made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company.  It too has a beveled glass crystal in a brass bezel hinged on the left, opening on the right with a spring latch to allow access for winding and setting.  The clock has a silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals and minute chapter swept by blackened steel spade hands.  The subsidiary seconds bit covering the “6” shows single seconds and is marked “CHELSEA.”  The retailer, “Joseph Jones, New York, U.S.A.” is identified above the center arbor.  This clock is an accurate timekeeper and runs 8 days on a single winding.  Complete with period Chelsea-marked winding key.  This lovely presentation measures 15 inches wide by 9 inches high and 2 ¾ inches thick.  Attesting to its shipboard use, brass mounting brackets are present top and bottom to fasten it securely to the bulkhead.  The carving of this set is of the first order, obviously done by a skilled ship carver.  This is a very rare ship Captain’s cabin item of unsurpassed quality -- certainly one of the finest we have seen in our 35 years.  The best!  2195


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13.38

 

13.38  EARLY SHIP’S ENGINEROOM CLOCK.   Magnificent late 19th century American ship’s clock made by Seth Thomas with the case and dial made by “Ashton Valve Co, Boston Mass.” as decoratively-engraved on the silvered brass dial below the winding arbors.   The dial, with engraved Arabic numerals, has a very bold minute chapter ring, large blued steel spade hands and a seconds bit below the 12.  This combination makes for an exceptionally handsome clock!   The dial is additionally marked “S.T.” and dated “1891” below the 6.  This most impressive ship’s timekeeper has a solid bronze case with classic flared bezel measuring 10 ¼ inches in diameter by 4 inches deep and weighs and amazing 16 pounds!  The glazed bezel with its original old wavy glass is hinged on the right, opening from the left with a secure button latch.  Speaking of its age, the glass is sealed within the bezel with plaster of Paris.  Amazingly, this handsome clock is a good timekeeper at 122 years old!  Very rare in this size, of this age and in such superb condition!  Complete with its original brass winding key!  Request Price Special Packaging

The Ashton Valve Company was begun in Boston during the Civil War producing steam valves, gauges and fittings for the emerging Industrial Revolution.  Located at 271 Franklin Street, Boston, the company received a gold medal at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.

Interestingly, an Internet competitor sold a similar clock a few years ago, for a very large, but undisclosed sum of money.  Their write-up goes to great lengths to extol the superb quality and rarity of that clock, which was clearly not as nice nor as old as the example offered here!  What’s more, we are now offering this same type clock for a much lower price than the inferior example sold for several years ago!  The link is:  http://landandseacollection.com/id191.html


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13.25  LARGE SHIPS BELL CLOCK.   Most impressive ship’s bell clock manufactured by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston as engraved between the winding arbors, “CHELSEA SHIPS BELL.”  This clock contains Chelsea’s finest quality jeweled ships bell movement with an 8 inch silvered brass dial, engraved with bold Arabic numerals, minute chapter, blued steel Breguet-type moon hands and reflector ring.  The enduring appeal of this clock is in its magnificent presentation.  It has a classic ship’s clock case of solid rose bronze with flared bezel hinging open with a spring-loaded button latch.  This clock is also equipped with the valuable added feature of having a bell ON/OFF switch.  The entire presentation weighs an astounding 17 pounds and measures 10 inches in diameter overall by 4 inches deep.  With a serial number of XXXXXX* this clock dates to early 1968.  It is in excellent running condition and is a good time keeper, striking the ships bell sequence properly with a clear sonorous tone.  It has just been thoroughly serviced by our AWI (American Watchmakers Institute) certified technician.  It is in excellent, virtually perfect cosmetic condition, after 45 years!  Complete with original Chelsea-marked brass winding key. Price Request

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.


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13.17


13.17    SHIP’s BELL CLOCK.  Second quarter 1900’s American ship’s bell clock made by the Seth Thomas Clock Company of Thomaston, Connecticut.  The silvered brass dial is marked “SETH THOMAS” just below the center arbor and “Made in U.S.A.” below the “6.”  This clock features bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by blackened spade hands, surrounded by the silvered brass reflector ring.  A Fast/Slow adjustment feature is present just above the center arbor.  The classic ship’s clock form features a flared Bakelite bezel hinged on the left, opening on the right, secured with a knurled locking screw on the original cork gasket.  The heavy clock case is made of zinc in its traditional black crackle finish.  The high grade jeweled all brass movement is Seth Thomas’ finest.  It is marked “Patented Oct.25.1921 Made in U.S.A. (<ST>).”  Then in fancy script it is signed “Seth Thomas Thomaston, Conn.” and is date stamped “6-44.”  This clock is in lovely cosmetic condition and is an excellent timekeeper, striking the ships bell sequence properly with a lovely sonorous tone.  It has just been thoroughly serviced by our AWI (American Watchmakers Institute) certified technician.  Complete with period brass winding key.   795


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Description: 13.08


13.08 NAUTICAL CLOCK AND BAROMETER SET. Handsome 3rd quarter of the 19th century English wall clock and barometer set with a nautical presentation. This high quality set is housed in a beautifully hand-carved oak case in the form of a large kedge anchor with the dials encircled by rope-carved borders. Both dials are finished in white enamel and are protected by beveled glass crystals. The clock has Roman numerals, Breguet-type moon hands and a minute chapter. The all brass 8-day jeweled movement is of the rare, early cylinder escapement type and runs well. The barometer is open faced showing its high quality movement. The dial is marked from 25 to 31 inches of mercury in 2/100ths increments with the standard weather indications, "RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR," etc. Both instruments are accessible from the rear. The clock has a hammered brass press-fit cover easily removed for winding and the barometer has a wooden cover secured by unusual slotted washers. The back of the case bears a wood-branded Victorian "Registration of Designs Office" mark used to identify pottery, wood and metal objects produced in England during the period from 1842 through 1883. Using it we can date the production of this clock/barometer exactly to June 19, 1873. (F, M, 19). The entire presentation measures 21 inches high and 10 inches wide. Outstanding original condition showing 140 years of careful use. 1395 Special Packaging


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13.21


13.21 EARLY SHIP'S BELL CLOCK. Genuine early 1900's American ship's bell clock made by Seth Thomas of Thomaston, Connecticut. This quality ship's clock has a silvered brass dial with bold black Roman numerals, blued steel spade hands, minute chapter ring and a seconds bit showing individual seconds below "XII." The dial is signed "SETH THOMAS" between the two winding arbors and is further marked "Made In U.S.A." below "VI.". The Fast/Slow adjust lever is above the 12 o'clock position and the manual strike lever marked "Strike" is left of "IX." The glazed hinged bezel with reflector ring opens from the left with a tight press fit. The case is the classic ship's clock type with flared bezel and is all brass in its original nickel finish. There is a screen at the bottom of the clock which allows maximum bell sound and it does so, ringing the ship's bell sequence properly with a loud, clear tone. The clock has just been thoroughly overhauled by a professional AWI-certified watchmaker and is in tip top condition. It is considered a 48 hours type. But in our possession since servicing, it has run 4 days on a single winding. 7 inches in diameter and 4 inches deep. Circa 1910. Excellent original condition showing wonderful age and absolutely no abuse. 495


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13.37


13.37  ALABASTER PRESENTATION CLOCK.  Fine, mid-19th century French mantel clock made for the English speaking market.  This 8-day spring wound pendulum clock has a circular brass movement stamped “243.”  It is housed within a lovely solid alabaster case with gilded brass fittings.  The pristine porcelain dial is hand-painted with blue Roman numerals and a minute chapter swept by Breguet style “moon hands” in gold.  The top is adorned with a classic Grecian urn and both sides contain gilt lion heads holding rings.  The clock rests on 4 gilt metal feet which are height adjustable to level the clock.  The bottom front bears the hand-engraved presentation on sterling silver reading, “PRESENTED TO Miss J. Jardine BY Mess’rs Stark & Son ->TAILORS<-.”   11 ¼ inches high by 8 ¾ inches wide and 4 inches deep.  Absolutely outstanding, near mint, original condition, and a very accurate time keeper.  It has just been thoroughly serviced by an American Watchmakers Institute-certified technician.  Complete with winding key.  795 Special Packaging



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13.56  YACHT WHEEL CLOCK.  Certainly one of the most recognizable and most sought after clocks ever made!  This impressive ship’s bell clock was manufactured by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston for the retailers “BROCK AND COMPANY” as engraved on the silvered brass dial.  Known as the “Mariner,” this clock contains Chelsea’s high quality jeweled ship’s bell movement with a 6 inch dial, Arabic numerals, minute chapter, blackened steel Breguet-type “moon” hands and reflector ring.  The enduring appeal of this clock is in its magnificent presentation.  It has a classic ship’s clock case with flared bezel hinging open with a spring-loaded button latch.  That solid brass case is then encircled by a massive bronze “ship’s wheel” with ten turned brass spokes.  It sets atop a graceful heavy bronze plinth mounted to a solid mahogany backboard and base.  The entire presentation weighs an astounding 25 pounds and measures 17 ¼ inches high overall!  The bezel of this clock is 7 ¼ inches in diameter and it measures 14 inches wide from spoke to spoke, while the base is 12 ¼ inches wide by 5 3/8 inches deep.  With a serial number of XXXXXX* this clock dates to 1956.  It is in excellent running condition and is a good time keeper, striking the ship’s bell sequence properly with a clear sonorous tone.  It is in excellent cosmetic condition, exhibiting only minor wear to the dial, well expected after more than a half century of use.  Complete with original Chelsea-marked brass winding key. Request Price Special Packaging

Brock and Company was a prominent, nationally recognized jewelry firm, certainly the most important jewelry store in Los Angeles. Brock's was founded by George A. Brock in 1903. In growing the company, Mr. Brock merged a number of other established Los Angeles jewelers into Brock & Company, including S. Nordlinger & Son, which had operated in Los Angeles since the late 1800's. In the 1920's, George Brock obtained a 99-year ground lease on the property at 515 West Seventh Street, and soon the custom-designed structure (now housing Seven Grand) was built.

With son George C. Brock at the helm, the company continued to grow. A second store was opened on Wilshire Boulevard, in Beverly Hills. At that time Tiffany and Co. even proposed the merger with Brock of "Tiffany-Brock & Co." However Brock's valued their independence and the merger did not take place.

In the early 60's, George C. Brock decided to retire. Ben Weingart, a young real estate broker in the 1920s, had been involved in the 99-year ground lease for the Brock & Co. parcel on Seventh Street. He approached Brock about purchasing some land owned by the company. Mr. Brock told Weingart that the only way he could acquire the land was to buy the company.

Mr. Weingart did just that, purchasing the single remaining Brock & Co. store downtown in 1964. Thereafter Mr. Weingart brought in a liquidator who operated the business for a few years, gradually selling off its inventory. The jewelry business ended, and some of the store fixtures were sold. Clifton's rented the building installed a cafeteria. George C. Brock died in 1967.

Originally offered as the “Yacht Wheel Clock with Base” in 1906, Chelsea gave this configuration its own identity as the “Mariner” in 1928.  The model was ultimately discontinued in 1984.

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.
  
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13.40 CHELSEA MARINER. The classic ship's bell mantel clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston as marked on the silvered brass dial, "CHELSEA SHIP'S BELL." This impressive timekeeper has Arabic numerals with blued steel Breguet-type "moon" hands and a minute chapter. The perfect 4 inch silvered brass dial is encircled by its original reflector ring and has a hinged bezel with button latch opening from the left for easy winding and setting access. The heavy brass case is surrounded by a brass and bronze "ship's wheel" with 10 spokes and is mounted on a bronze pedestal affixed to its full length mahogany back with sub-base. The pedestal retains its original factory statuary bronze patina. The all brass jeweled movement is Chelsea's finest. With a matching case and movement number of XXXXXX* this clock dates to 1948. 14 inches high, 10 1/4 inches wide and 5 inches deep. Outstanding condition in every respect. It is hard to believe that this clock, in such fine condition, is over 60 years old! It is rare to find these old clocks in their original factory finish. Complete with Chelsea-marked winding key. Request Price Special Packaging

According to Andy Demeter, author of "Chelsea Clock Company The First Hundred Years," 2001, Demeter Publications Ltd., Chelsea, Mass., on page 202, Chelsea first produced this design as the "Yacht Wheel Clock" in 1906. In 1928 the model name was changed to the "Mariner." The Mariner line was discontinued in 1984.

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this clock is being withheld.

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13.75 CAPTAIN's CABIN CLOCK and BAROMETER SET. Genuine 19th century ship's clock and barometer set consisting of a handsome 9 inch diameter clock together with a 9 1/2 inch diameter barometer/thermometer -- both in beautiful "rope" carved wooden cases. The quality clock has a white enameled zinc dial, bold Roman numerals, steel spade hands, large inset seconds bit and two winding arbors. The hinged brass bezel opens and closes with a press fit affording easy access for winding and setting. The all brass 8-day movement is stamped "Ansonia Clock Co., U.S.A." and keeps good time, having just been professionally serviced. The back of the clock case bears the remnants of the old Ansonia label. The equally handsome barometer has an ornate white dial calibrated in inches from 27.8 to 31.2 in 2/100th increments and bears the standard weather indications "STORMY, RAIN, FAIR,' etc. Below is a curved mercury thermometer calibrated in both Fahrenheit and Centigrade. The barometer bears a large black indicator needle overlain by a brass "set" needle attached to a knurled brass knob. The dial is protected by its original thick beveled glass crystal set in a brass bezel. Both the barometer and thermometer function properly. Telling of this set's use aboard ship, both the clock and barometer have their original brass hanging brackets at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions to firmly secure them to the bulkhead. In addition, the barometer has wind indications marked on its dial, as expected of an instrument used at sea. This is a very elegant 19th century set that likely graced a Captain's cabin. Request Price

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