West Sea Company

11. Sailor Folk Art

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN



11.55  CASED DOMINO SET.  Classic 19th century sailor-made game set in the form of double 6’s dominos housed in their original machine dove-tailed hardwood box with sliding lid.   This perfect complete set of 28 pieces is constructed of whalebone and ebony laminated together with brass pins.  Each gaming piece is beautifully hand-detailed and measures 1 ¾ inches long by 7/8 inches wide and 5/16 inches thick.  They are housed in the original box measuring 7 inches long by 2 ¼ inches wide and 2 inches thick.  Absolutely outstanding condition in all respects.  This set exhibits its age with no flaws.  The game pieces themselves are all perfect.  Priced to sell. 179


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11.54  SAILOR SHIP COMMEMORATIVE.  Very nice turn-of-the-last century sailor-made ship memento depicting the British Royal Navy battleship “HMS CANOPUS” as nicely-painted in gold top and bottom.  This good example of early sailor folk art features a carved wooden “lifering” frame.  Each side is decorated with colorful crossed ensigns of the British merchant fleet and the Royal Navy.  The ring encircles an original silver plate photo of the CANOPUS at anchor.  Close scrutiny under magnification reveals many details including sailors on deck, deck equipment, guns, twin stacks and her unusually wide conning bridge!   The image is framed by a reverse-painted shield on the old wavy glass.  The outer frame is encircled by a “life line” which doubles as a hanger.  9 ½ inches in diameter.  Condition is excellent, showing the typical signs of wear and age for such an item about 120 years old.  The photograph is perfect.  199 

HMS CANOPUS was a pre-dreadnought battleship in the Royal Navy and the first ship in her class.  Intended for service in Asia, CANOPUS and her sister ships were smaller and faster than the preceding Majestic-class battleships, but retained the same main battery of four 12 inch guns.  She was laid down in January 1897, launched in October, and commissioned in December 1899.                                                                       

After commissioning CANOPUS served in the Mediterranean Fleet until 1903, when she underwent a refit.  In 1905 she steamed to East Asia, but the renewal of an Anglo-Japanese Alliance that year rendered her presence in Asian waters unnecessary.  She returned to Britain and served with several fleet commands including the Atlantic Fleet, the Channel Fleet, and the Home Fleet.  A short deployment to the Mediterranean followed in 1908–1909.  Upon returning to Britain, she was placed in reserve.

At the outset of the First World War in August 1914, she was mobilized for service on South American Station, where she patrolled for German commerce raiders.  She was involved in the search for the German East Asia Squadron of Vice Admiral Maximilian von Spee.  Too slow to follow Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock's cruisers, she missed the Battle of Coronel in November 1914 in which Cradock was defeated.  Moored at Port Stanley as a defensive battery, she fired the first shots of the Battle of the Falklands in December, which led Spee to break off the attack prior to being chased down and destroyed by Admiral Sturdee's battle cruisers.

CANOPUS was transferred to the Mediterranean in early 1915 for the Dardanelles Campaign.  She participated in major attacks on the Ottoman coastal fortifications defending the Dardanelles in March 1915.  But the British and French fleets proved incapable of taking the straits.  After the Gallipoli campaign ended in the withdrawal of Allied forces in January 1916, CANOPUS patrolled the eastern Mediterranean.  She was removed from service in April 1916 and was converted into a barracks ship in early 1918.  At war's end, she was decommissioned and broken up in 1920.



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5.43/11.52   SAILOR FOLK ART COMMEMORATIVE.  An exceptional example of World War II U.S. Navy sailor folk art in the form of an original framed  photograph of the USS LANGLEY (CVL-27) at anchor.  This large black and white photograph shows the mighty ship “on the hook” in a calm sea with pennants flying from her yard arm, as the ship’s boats ride on the boat boom on her starboard quarter aft.  The photograph, under glass, is mounted in an amazing wooden frame carved in the form of 2 anchors intertwined by blackened hemp rope with two square knots top and bottom.  The area immediately surrounding the photograph is gold-painted plaster.  Equally amazing is the fact that the back of the frame is fitted with a large metal panel, presumably taken from the ship!  This wonderful relic measure 17 ¾ inches wide by 13 ½ inches tall.   The image is 6 ¾ by 10 ½ inches site.  The entire presentation is in outstanding original condition in all respects.  The photograph is clear, detailed and flawless.   Owing to its quality, size and composition, we believe  it was an Official U.S. Navy photograph.   One of the most interesting war mementoes we have ever come across. 395

USS LANGLEY (CVL-27) namesake of America’s first aircraft carrier (CV-1/AV-3), was laid down at Camden, New Jersey in April 1942.  The first LANGLEY was sunk by enemy action only 2 months earlier.   LANGLEY (CVL-27) was originally ordered as the light cruiser FARGO, but with the loss of her predecessor the necessity of adding more carriers to the fleet was seen.  So she was redesigned as an aircraft carrier, using the original cruiser hull and machinery, ironically much like the first LANGLEY had been built.  She was launched on May 22, 1943 and Commissioned in August 1943.   LANGLEY headed to the Pacific late in the year and entered combat in the Marshall Islands operation in January–February 1944.  During the next four months, her planes attacked Japanese positions in the central Pacific and western New Guinea.  In June 1944 she took part in the assault on the Marianas and in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

LANGLEY continued her war role through the end of 1944, participating in the Palau Operation, raids on the Philippines, Formosa and the Ryukyus, and the Battle of Leyte Gulf.  In January–February 1945 she participated  with the Third Fleet in the South China Sea,  making the first massed carrier attacks on the Japanese Home Islands and the invasion of Iwo Jima.  More combat followed in March–May with LANGLEY’s planes  hitting more targets in Japan and in support of the invasion of Okinawa.  After overhaul in the U.S. in June and July, LANGLEY was en route to the Pacific war zone again when the war ended in August.

Following service in  transporting Pacific veterans home, LANGLEY went to the Atlantic Ocean, where she carried out similar missions from November 1945 through January 1946.   Inactive at Philadelphia during the remainder of 1946, the carrier was decommissioned  in February 1947.
USS LANGLEY (CVL-27) was awarded 9 battle stars for her participation in World War II.


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CAPT. WALLACE DILLON, COMMANDING OFFICER

The impressive war records painted on the side of the superstructure represent 48 enemy aircraft shot down, 22 bombing missions, 3 warships and 8 merchant ships sunk, and 63 aircraft destroyed on the ground.

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11.53 SAILOR KNOTWORK FRAME. An amazing testament to the seamanship skills exemplified in this hand-tied ropework display Done with cotton cordage and “small stuff” on a wooden backing, this frame contains an unbelievable array of knots forming its perimeter. On the reverse is a weathered old label reading ““Northwind” A Superb Example of an Ancient nautical Art The knotting in this design is composed of the following: Sword mat, 7-Strand Epaulet, Triple Passed Bugler’s Braid, 4-Strand Jury Knot Mat, Double-Passed Flat Sennit, 12 Strand, Double Passed English Sennit, 17 Strand, Triple-Passed Interlock Carrick Bend Double Passed . The “NORTHWIND” is an original creation by Seaworthy, San Diego 1, California.” The frame houses a matted print by of Montague Dawson of a 2-masted yawl on a port tack. The frame measures 13 inches high by 15 ½ inches wide. Overall condition is excellent. There is absolutely no damage or wear to the ropework. The reverse is covered in its original paper which has toned with age and the label has some losses, none of which affect the print. From our personal collection for over 30 years. A superb example by a master. Ready to hang. 395


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11.75 SEAM RUBBER. Particularly well executed mid-19th hand held tool used by a sailor to crease a fold in sail cloth prior to stitching. This genuine sailmaker's seam rubber is fashioned from a single piece of oak with an octagonally-faceted shaft, tapered "blade" and octagonal rounded knob. The shaft is drilled through, presumably to accommodate a thong. Adding to its charm and identification as sailor folk art, the knob is inlaid with a lovely disc of mother-of-pearl. This scarce instrument is rich with wear and patina attesting to years of actual use aboard a sailing ship. 4 1/2 inches long. A very charming tangible example sailing history. 229



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11.50 IDENTIFIED SEAM RUBBER. Documented sailor-carved sailmaker’s tool from the prestigious collection of E. Norman Flayderman, well known antique arms dealer and author of the famous book “Scrimshaw & Scrimshanders, Whales & Whalemen.” This genuine 19th century nautical artifact is carved from a single piece of dense rosewood. It has a beautifully-faceted diamond handle giving way to an octagonally-shaped shaft terminating in a broad “working end” blade. As such it can also be considered sailor folk art. Such tools were used by sailmakers to crease the canvas before stitching using their distinctive triangular sailmaker’s needles. It measures 4 ½ inches long, 2 ¼ inches wide on the blade and 1 1/8 inches thick. It is in outstanding original condition with a lovely natural polish to its uniquely hard wood. 895

This seam rubber comes with an original letter on N. FLAYDERMAN & CO., INC. letterhead, personally signed by Mr. Flayderman which states (in part), “This is to verify that the antique Scrimshaw seam rubber that accompanies this letter was part of my personal collection for a great many years.  It is the exact specimen I used to illustrate the work authored by myself SCRIMSHAW & SCRIMSHANDERS, WHALES & WHALEMEN and appears on page 126.  I consider it to be an excellent example of a classic Scrimshaw artifact.”


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11.49   DOMINO SET.   Full set of double sixes dominos, consisting of 28 pieces made of whale bone and rich mahogany.  Each piece consists of a slab of dense whalebone inset with black dots, blank through double six having the center divided by an incised red line.  The equal size pieces measure 1 by 2 inches and are 5/16 inches thick.  Excellent original condition showing good age.  A $250 value, these are bargain-priced at only 95

A similar smaller, and inferior set of dominos has been offered for sale on eBay with a "Buy It Now" price of $200.

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11.25  SHIP IN A BOTTLE DIORAMA.  Most charming, early 1900’s ship in a bottle scene depicting a large 3-masterd bark passing a town with numerous features.  These include a large windmill, a derrick lifting a load of lumber on the shoreline, a truss bridge over a river, a town in the hills complete with church tower, and a train on tracks running into a tunnel!  The ship itself has a raised foc’sle and poop carved from a single piece of wood.  Portholes are depicted along it sides, and it is complete with standing rigging.  The ship plies a blue putty sea and the inside of the bottle has a painted blue sky with clouds.  This is all contained within an early molded whiskey bottle with long neck sealed with the original cork under old red paint.  The glass is clear, the colors bright and the contents are untouched.  11 ¼ inches long by 3 inches in diameter.  WAS 495  NOW! 249Special Packaging


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11.47  EARLY NAVAL CANNON MODEL.  Splendid Civil War era sailor-made model of a much earlier 18th century Naval gun.  This incredibly realistic miniature cannon has a very heavy, solid brass barrel with integrally-cast trunnions, decorative turnings and a bulbous breach ball.  The muzzle exhibits a very smooth bore with a 3/8 inch diameter.   The stout barrel is mounted to a classic gun carriage of dense, old best mahogany.  The carriage is supported on 4 charming carved wooden wheels in red ochre paint mounted on hardwood axles.  The front of the carriage is equipped with two separate rope stays with brass fasteners.  Cleverly, the ropes are macraméd in such a way as to absorb shock from the recoil of the gun.  To these ends, the back of the cannon has two wooden wedges for placement under the rear wheels to minimize recoil.  The lines and attachments are done in a most seamanlike manner with tight serving on each.  A solid ebony breech block is present to properly elevate the gun by wedging the breach atop the carriage.  This realistic, superbly detailed model comes complete with a ramrod on the right side of the carriage supported by two carved wooden “shield” brackets.  The left side has a decorative wooden oval inlaid with a circular disc similar to the wheels.  The barrel itself measures exactly 7 3/16 inches long and 1 5/8 inches in diameter at the widest.  The carriage is 4 ½ inches wide overall.  Fully extended the components measure 17 inches long overall.  Condition is outstanding and original in all respects with a great patina exhibiting age and careful respect.   While the touch hole is contiguous with the barrel, we do not recommend firing.  This is the finest such antique cannon model of its type we have ever seen.  We grudgingly relinquish it from our personal collection for a price of less than what we paid for it over 20 years ago!  475


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11.45   EXCEPTIONAL CARVED FRAME.   Beautifully- carved and inlaid picture frame made from a single panel of rich African mahogany in the form of a ship’s lifering.  This especially nice presentation features marguetry butterflies made of varietal woods inlaid on the left and right of the ring.  The center features a rectangular opening for inserting a photograph, presumably of the sailor who carved it.  Flanking each side of the opening are carved daisies with thistle-like flowers resembling anchors, above and below.  At the top of the ring is the marguetry wood inlaid “HMS,” and the bottom “CODETIA.”   The back is equipped with a hand-cut copper hanging bracket and 4 pivoting retaining wedges.  10 ¾ inches in diameter.   Fabulous original, untouched condition exhibiting a great age patina.  One of the best sailor folk art items we have ever come across.  A real keeper!  195

HMS CODETIA was an Arabis-class sloop launched in 1916 in the service of the Royal Navy’s Fisheries Protection during World War I.  She had a length of 255 feet, a beam of 33 feet 6 inches, a draft of 11 feet 9 inches and displaced 1,250 tons.  After 21 years of wartime and peaceful duties she was broken up in 1937.


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11.04

11.04  P.O.W. GAMEBOX.  Authentic late 18th or very early 19th century “game casket” made by French prisoners in British prisons during the Napoleonic Wars.  This fine example is constructed entirely of beef bone and wood, with colored paper and even some genuine gold foil!  The box, in the form of a 4-poster bed with bone columns, is finely constructed of pine with pinned and dowelled fittings.  Overlaying the wooden structure the entire surface is covered by meticulously carved bone panels done with incredible detail.  These are affixed in the classic manner with scores of metal rivets!  The sliding lid is “domed” and decorated with reticulated bone panels overlying green paper and two “clubs” of gold.  All four sides of the box are decorated in a similar manner with “sashes” and recurring designs.  The interior of the box is divided into 3 compartments.  The largest houses a  full set of 55 double nines bone domino pieces!  The second holds hand-painted bone playing cards of which there are more than 25 pieces.  The third compartment holds bone die.  This rare set measures 9 inches log, 3 ½ inches wide and 2 ¼ inches high.  The entire presentation is in a remarkable state of original preservation considering the delicacy of its construction and its 200 plus years.  1995



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11.73  P.O.W. TRAVELING  BOX.  Genuine late 18th century or very early 1800’s lidded box with a mirror in the lid, made by a gifted French prisoner incarcerated in a British prison during the Napoleonic Wars.    The entire upper portion of the box is meticulously covered in colored straw inlaid with intricate geometric patterns, the foremost of which is an elaborate checkerboard with the “grain” of the straw running in opposed diagonal directions.  Inside, the mirror is fringed with cut out paper in the form of clover leafs.  The age of the mirror is telling, being extremely early glass with significant striations.  3 ½ by 2 ½ by 1 inches.  Excellent original condition with only a couple of minor losses -- remarkable for a piece which is over 200 years old!  199



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11.43  IDENTIFIED SEA CHEST.  Truly exceptional 19th century seaman’s trunk with all the bells and whistles collectors avidly seek.  This classic 6 board American chest has sloping “canted” sides made of New England pine with hand dove-tailed construction bearing its original chocolate brown paint.   In true sea chest fashion it has a molded “skirt” on the lid which effectively prevented water from entering the top and a raised “kick board” bottom on all four sides which prevented water seeping in from the deck.  The interior exhibits a single drawer till, iron lock and striker plate, and traditional old hand-forged strap hinges.  The tour de force is the oil on sail canvas painting in the lid depicting the massive sailing bark at sea under full sail, identified below as the “4 . MAST . BARQUE .“EDWARD  SEWILL (sic)” .  BATH . MAINE . U.S.A.”  The huge square rigger with towering skysail royals is shown flying the American flag from her spanker aft with a 3-funneled liner depicted in the distance.  The character and execution of the painting is charmingly naïve with good attention to deck detail -- as expected of a sailor/artist.  Several crewmen are depicted.  The painting measures 26 by 16 ½ inches sight and is rimmed by another ½ inch strip of canvas held by numerous small tacks.   Although the chest itself may be a half century older than its turn-of-the-century identification, the context of the time in which the painting was rendered must be considered.  America had just won a resounding victory in the Spanish-American War.  The Spanish fleet was decimated.  Patriotic exuberance was at an all time high as the United States confidently entered the coming century as a world power.  With that noted, the finishing touches of this sea chest’s beckets and cleats can be appreciated.  The lovely extra large beckets are intricately woven of leather with Spanish hitching and Turks head knots.  The decoratively-carved wooden cleats are painted with patriotic Union shields on both ends.  40 inches long by 16 ½ inches high.  17 inches wide at the base by 15 ½ inches wide on the lid.  There are the typical cracks and nicks expected of a working sea chest well over 100 years old.  But these are merely character marks, not considered to be damage.  Accordingly this handsome chest can be rated as being in “excellent original condition.”  There is no doubt that this sailor member of the merchant sail fraternity was extremely proud to be an American at sea. SOLD



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11.27  EXQUISITE POWDER HORN.  Early 1800’s British seaman’s powder flask carved from the tough shell of a coconut.  This extraordinary example is meticulously carved with the finest detail depicting several charming vignettes.  Telling of its origins it shows a crown encircled by an oval double rope border near the bottom.  Nearer the top is the carved inscription “MY HART” encircled by a rope border festooned with leaves and five-pointed stars top and bottom.  Two conjoined hearts are pierced by arrows.  These are flanked by two scaly serpents with arrows for tongues.  There is a mythical beast adorning the top complete with scaly back, lizard legs, two open eyes, and a mouth made of faceted pewter which also serves as the flask’s spout.  On either side are pewter mounting lugs which would have been attached to a strap for carrying.  The remainder of the flask is adorned with any number of rosettes, vines, stars, recurring designs, pinwheels and two castles astride a plinth surmounted by pinwheels! Execution of the carving is of the first order.  The fine detail is literally amazing, and bears close scrutiny under magnification – a true testament to the carver’s advanced skills!  5 ½ inches long by 4 ¼ inches in diameter.  Fabulous original condition. Price Request

 

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11.39  SHIP IN A BOTTLE DIORAMA.  Very nice late 19th century American ship in a bottle scene depicting a well-scaled 4-masted bark passing a town.  This handsome example of sailor folk art features a black hulled ship with painted gun ports flying the American flag from the spanker.  The masts and spars are depicted with the appropriate standing rigging.  The background is a lovely little town consisting of several buildings including a church, windmill, lighthouse, shoreline and numerous trees.  All of this is set in the early hand-blown bottle exhibiting numerous bubbles in the glass with two distinctive decorative bulbous rings which terminate in an ovoid neck, making for a most pleasing presentation.  This ship in a bottle is exceptionally clear and bright.  It measures 11 ¼ inches in length by 3 ¼ inches in diameter and is in fabulous original condition.   695



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11.36  CLASSIC SHIP IN A BOTTLE.  A most excellent late 1800’s bottle diorama consisting of a 4-masted American bark backed by a charming town.   This is one of the oldest ships in bottles we offer, evidenced by its hand-blown whiskey bottle with bulbous neck, thick bottom and bubbled glass.  The hull is of one piece carved wooden construction set into a blue putty sea.   The prow is identified with the name “BETTY.”  The masts and spars are well proportioned and the ship is appropriately rigged with taut original lines.  The ship flies its house flag “F.S.” from the mainmast and the American ensign from the spanker boom aft.   In the background is a classic diorama depicting a town of 6 houses, a church, a windmill and a large lighthouse.  The shore is lined with at least 11 “leafy” trees carved from wood.  The gray sky above the town is done in an unusual manner -- painted on the outside of the bottle.  The finishing touch is the stopper which is nicely painted in patriotic red white and blue.  Exactly 12 inches long by 3 ½ inches in diameter.  This bottle model is crystal clear and the contents are colorful and bright.  It has been beautifully preserved for well over 100 years in pristine original condition!  695 Special Packaging


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11.35  HUGE IDENTIFABLE SHIP DIORAMA.   The largest antique ship in a bottle we have ever seen!  This early example of sailor folk art in a bottle dates from the turn-of-the-last century and undoubtedly depicts the one and only 5-masted sailing ship PREUSSEN.   It features this exceptionally large 5-masted, square-rigged ship flying the American flag from the spanker boom aft, the house flag from the mainmast and a colorful pennant from the aftermast.  The ship’s hull is carved from a single piece of wood, itself measuring 9 inches long inclusive of the bowsprit!  It has 3 deck houses, a capstan on the foc’sle and two life boats on deck.  The masts and spars are nicely proportioned and all rigging is intact.   Steaming alongside the ship on its port side is a charming 2-masted vessel belching cotton “smoke” from its stack.  In the background a large town consisting of 5 buildings and an imposing lighthouse is depicted.  All of this is set in a colorful putty sea together with a cliff shoreline.  This remarkable presentation is contained in a clear molded glass bottle with a greenish tinge, the top of which is embossed “ONE GALLON” and is sealed with its original cork stopper with tassel.   It measures an impressive 13 ½ inches long by 5 ½ inches in diameter!  Capping off this display, the bottle rests on its custom, solid teak stand of handsome proportion and finish with two supports done in the traditional way using mortise and tenon joints.  The stand measures 14 3/8 inches long by 6 ¼ inches wide and is 1 1/4 inches thick. SOLD

While the vessel in this diorama is depicted flying the American ensign, it was likely made in homage to PREUSSEN’s single visit to an American port in April 1908, when by all accounts she reportedly wowed New Yorkers with her size and unique design.

PREUSSEN,  the only 5-masted square-rigged sailing ship ever built, was launched on May 7, 1902 at the J. C. Tecklenborg shipyard in Geestemunde, Germany to the plans of chief designer Dr. Georg Wilhelm Claussen.  Commissioned on July 31, 1902, hull number 179, she was made of steel 482 feet in length overall and displaced 11,150 tons.   She departed Bremerhaven, the day of her commissioning, to Iquique on her maiden voyage under the command of Captain Boye Richard Petersen, who actually assisted the naval architect with her design.  Legend has it that Kaiser Wilhelm II, while visiting the 5-masted barque POSTOI  in June 1899, asked the Captain when a 5-masted full-rigged ship would "finally come."  This inspired POSTOI’s owner, Carl Heinrich Laeisz, to order the ship.

As built, this unique vessel could weather the fiercest storm and even navigate in a force 9 gale.  In such conditions it took 8 men to hold the 6 ½ foot double helm wheel!  PREUSSEN  plied the nitrate trade to Chile, setting speed records in the process.  Due to her appearance, size and excellent sailing characteristics seamen called her the "Queen of  Queens of the Sea."  She made twelve round trips between Hamburg and Chile and a round the world voyage via New York to Yokohoma, Japan under charter to the Standard Oil Company.  The mighty Preußen, as she was called by her sailors, had only two skippers in her brief career, Captain Boye Richard Petersen (11 voyages) and Captain Jochim Hans Hinrich Nissen (2 voyages and the collision). Both masters developed their skills sailing such a huge ship under Captain Robert Hilgendorf, late master of the POSTOI.

On November 6, 1910, outbound on her 14th voyage to Chile, PREUSSEN  was rammed by the British cross-channel steamer BRIGHTON  8 nautical miles south of Newhaven.  Unwittingly, the BRIGHTON  attempted to cross PREUSSEN’s bow, underestimating her unusually fast 16 knot speed and ignoring her right-of-way as a sailing vessel.   PREUSSEN  was seriously damaged and lost much of her forward rigging, making it impossible to steer her to safety.   BRIGHTON  returned to Newhaven to summon aid.  The tug ALERT was dispatched to assist PREUSSEN.   But a typical November gale thwarted attempts to sail or tow the huge vessel to safety.   Intensions were for her to anchor off Dover, but both anchor chains broke and PREUSSEN  was driven onto the rocks at Crab Bay where she ultimately sank in 3 ½ fathoms of water.  While the crew and some of the cargo were saved, PREUSSEN  was unsalvageable.  BRIGHTON’s master was found responsible for the collision and his license was revoked.   To this day the  ribs of PRUESSEN can still be seen off Crab Bay during the Spring low tides.


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11.32 SHIP DIORAMA IN A LIGHT BULB.   Especially rare, absolutely delightful sailor folk art depiction of a Dutch steamship at sea with the shore and a town in the background -- all contained in a very early 1900's light bulb! This charming presentation features an old 2-masted steamship with 2 funnels belching (cotton) smoke and flying the Dutch ensign. The detail on this small ship is truly amazing. It features an open bridge abaft of which are 4 classic ventilators and an engineroom skylight. The foc’sle is equipped with capstan, windlass and lifelines!  Aft, the raised poop deck has a skylight and more incredible miniature life lines, not expected on a model of this size. Portholes are depicted on the deck house and along the bulwark. The town in the background consists of 4 buildings, a church, a windmill and a tree. At the extreme left a well proportioned lighthouse stands as a sentinel. This early light bulb is hand-blown, evidenced by the glass pontil nib on the end.   The threaded brass base is marked "PAT NOV 8 1904."  The entire bulb measures 5 inches long and is 2 ½ inches in diameter at the widest.  Outstanding original condition.  Clear and bright.  Complete with lovely removable custom-made solid African mahogany display stand with felt bottom.   The stand measures 2 ½ by 5 12/ inches and is 1 ¼ inches thick.  For the ship in a bottle collector, this is the ultimate addition!  Circa 1910.  795

This bulb most certainly is American with patent markings and date, the duration of which was 12 years. Accordingly the latest it could date is 1916, prior to World War I!


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11.30  SHIP IN A BOTTLE DIORAMA.   Extra nice early 20th century ship in a bottle diorama depicting a large 4-masted bark passing a town of exceptional size and complexity.  There are at least 30 buildings, several carved wooden trees and a large clock tower in the background.   The ship, with sleek, graceful hull, is carved from a single piece of wood painted blue with a salmon deck.  It flies the owner’s flag from the fore and the Italian merchant ensign aft.  This fine example of sailor folk art is signed on banners above the town “Armandad Elina / Recordad di mi / Remember to me.”  All of this is captured in time within a long neck whiskey bottle of clear glass, showing its age with a pontil on the bottom and bubbles in the glass.  It is capped off with the original cork bearing a star sealed under sealing wax.  The bottle is 11 inches long by 4 inches in diameter.  A remarkable feature of this presentation is its charming wooden stand with classic chipped-carved border and muted green, red and yellow paint.  The stand measures 8 inches long by 3 inches wide.   Condition is exceptional.  The bottle is clear and the interior colors clean and bright.  595 Special Packaging


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11.18  SHIP IN A BOTTLE DIORAMA.  Classic early 1900’s ship in a bottle model depicting a 3-masted bark flying an American flag, passing an American lighthouse station.  The well-detailed ship has a carved and painted wooden hull which plies a green putty sea.  The prominent lighthouse at the rear of the bottle stands next to early Marconi long wire transmission towers, followed by the charming lighthouse keeper’s residence   with two chimneys and a large flagpole flying an oversize American flag!  The scene is contained within a molded glass bottle reading “ONE QUART.”  The long neck of the bottle is decorated with sailor macramé in the form of a Turk’s head knot and stoppered with the original cork under sealing wax.  11 ¼ inches long by 3 ½ inches in diameter.  The bottle is clean, clear and bright.  A very nice example of this early form of sailor folk art, approximately 100 years old at good value.  449 Special Packaging


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11.19 SAILOR'S NEEDLE CASE. Extra large 19th century sailmaker's needle case. This very fine example of working sailor folk art consists of a carved wooden tube with a matching "plug" cap which joins with a tight press fit. Over each is meticulously woven decorative Spanish hitching done in traditional sailor fashion known as McNamara work or "macramé." Such a covering was functional, providing a wear resistant, easily gripped covering which also spoke of the sailor's abilities as an accomplished seaman. This extra large specimen measures 8 ½ inches long by 1 ½ inches in diameter and is complete with 2 old sail canvas needles. One is triangular-shaped with English markings and the other has an unusual curved “spade” shape. Excellent original condition with a deep, rich old shellacked surface. A very handsome deck hand's needle case from the days of sail. Certainly one of the nicest examples currently on the market. 395


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11.51 FOLK ART CARVING. Incredible 19th century whimsy carved from a single block of wood. This outstanding example of the carver's art depicts a hook and eye attached to a "capture ball" encased in a cage which is is attached to another eye carved with a large circular ring. The amazing aspect of this carving is that it is fashioned from a single piece of pine, requiring both planning and skill to execute in such a detailed manner. The carving measures 10 1/2 inches long and is in outstanding original condition with an excellent oxidized natural wood finish with beautiful patination. 195

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11.94 SAILOR'S NEEDLE CASE. Huge 19th century sailmaker's needle case. This exceptionally large example of working sailor folk art consists of a carved wooden tube with a matching "plug" cap which joins with a tight press fit. Over each is meticulously woven decorative Spanish hitching done in traditional sailor fashion known as McNamara work or "macramé". Such a covering was functional, providing a wear resistant, easily gripped covering which also spoke of the sailor's abilities as an accomplished seaman. This amazing example measures 9 1/2 inches long by 1 3/4 inches in diameter and is complete with 2 old triangular-shaped heavy sail canvas needles, both with English markings. Excellent original condition with a rich old surface. A simply great deck hand's needle case from the days of sail! The largest example we have ever seen. 495

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Also see catalog pages 2, 4 and 20 for more sailor-made folk art items

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