West Sea Company

2. Models & Half Hulls

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN

 




2.19 DOCKYARD MODEL. Authentic mid-19th C. cased shipyard builder's half hull model of the 3-masted sailing ship VERBENA built by "Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland," England as identified in hand-painted lettering below the bow. This exceptional model exhibits all of the detail and quality expected of an "owner's model" as built by the shipyard that produced the actual ship. Fine, fancy original glazed hardwood case measuring 85 inches long, 17 1/2 inches high and 9 inches deep overall. The model itself measures 70 1/2 inches long from stern to bowsprit. Circa 1856. Immaculate condition throughout. Certainly worthy of the finest museum! Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

"Lloyd's Register of Shipping" Volume 1871 lists the VERBENA as a wooden hull bark of 260 feet in length, displacing 466 tons net. She was built in Sunderland in 1856 and operated by J. Whitfield of Sunderland.

In a publication entitled "Sunderland Builds Ships," 1989, Tyne and Wear Archive Service, City of Sunderland, England, William Pickersgill is identified as one of the prominent Wearside (River Wear) shipbuilding firms from 1847-1936.



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2.48  MINIATURE HALF HULL.  Genuine, late 19th century folk art half hull of a sailing cutter.  This delightful little model was entirely scratch-built.  It consists of a carved and shaped wooden hull of rich mahogany, with applied rudder, mast, bowsprit and deck house, embellished with hand-made brass fittings.  These include a brass kedge anchor, bowsprit chain, shroud stays, ship’s wheel, chocks, bit and mainsail lashings.  The stubbed wooden mast is mortised into the deck and depicted in the classical manner as is the rudder.  Of particular note is the painstakingly carved trim surrounding the cockpit and deck rail. This delicate little model was
obviously hand-done and is perfect!  The hull itself measures 10 ½ inches from stem to stern.  With the bowsprit it is 13 inches long and 4 1/8 inches tall from keel to mast top.  The model is mounted to a later solid mahogany backboard which is nevertheless antique.  It measures 14 3/8 inches long by 5 ¾ high and is equipped with 2 period brass hanging brackets.  This is a beautiful little model, the likes of which is the first we have  encountered in our 35+ years.   A real charmer which will make a prized wall hanger in one of those hard to fit little spaces in a good collection!  339



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2.47   EARLY U.S. NAVY DESTROYER MODEL.  Period, scratch-built model depicting the World War I era model of the famous 4-Piper destroyer USS BORIE (DD-215).  This hand-made model was meticulously constructed of wood and brass in a charming folk art way using very professional techniques.  Details, while not necessarily to scale, are very faithful to the original.  All manner of deck fittings, lockers, funnels, escape trunks with covers, scuttles, hatches, 6 inch guns, machine gun aft, chocks, bitts, twin kedge anchors, anchor fall, doors, skylight, wireless antennas, halyards, torpedo tubes, depth charges, capstan, ship’s bell, steam whistles, siren, searchlights, running lights, range finder, crow’s nest, binnacles, portholes, 3 sets of davits containing the Captain’s gig, motor launch and whaleboat, swinging boat boom, standing rigging, Union Jack, Ensign, lifelines, life rafts, ladders, accommodation ladder, bilge keels, twin propellers and rudder are all depicted among other details.  This well-built model measures 39 inches long by 3 3/4 inches wide at the widest and stands 15 1/4 inches tall at the foremast inclusive of the original stand.  The mahogany stand is noteworthy in that it is beautifully fitted to the ship’s hull in a graceful manner.  The footprint of the stand is 3 1/4 by 23 inches.  Without a doubt, this model was constructed contemporaneously with the actual ship by a sailor intimately familiar with its details.  It exhibits great age and weathering, even a variegated patina much like that of an actual ship at sea!  Excellent original condition.  Some of the more fragile lines of this model have been reinforced by a professional museum-certified model restorer.  In fact this model was recently deasseccioned by the San Diego Maritime Museum, as identified by the museum acquisition markings painted on the forward left portion of the stand.  An ex-museum bargain which should be at least double this price! Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

The USS BORIE (DD-215) was launched by the William Cramp & Sons Shipyard, Philadelphia on October 4, 1919 and commissioned on March 24, 1920 with a compliment of 122 men.  She had a length of 314’ 4”, breadth of 31’ 9”, a draft of 9’ 10” and displaced 1,215 tons.  Top speed 35 knots.

BORIE first saw service in the Black Sea.  After a year she was transferred to the Asiatic Fleet where she spent the next 4 years.  From 1927- 1929 BORIE saw service in the Atlantic cruising the Caribbean and Europe.  In 1929 she again transferred to the Asiatic Fleet for a 3 year tour.  Returning to CONUS in 1932 BORIE joined the Pacific Fleet, stationed in San Diego.  At the outbreak of World War II BORIE was assigned to patrol Panama Bay and the Caribbean.

In late July 1942 BORIE joined USS CARD (CVE-11) as part of a hunter-killer group against German submarines in the Atlantic.  On November 1, 1943, while conducting the last of 4 patrols, BORIE rammed and sank German submarine U-405.  In doing so, the collision killed 27 BORIE crewmen and rendered the ship too badly damaged to maneuver.  BORIE was intentionally sunk by her sister ship USS BARRY (DD-248) on November 2nd.
BORIE received 3 Battle Stars for her World War II service and the Presidential Unit Citation for her participation in the CARD operations.

A second destroyer was named in her honor and commissioned on September 21, 1944.



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2.43  EARLY SAILING SHIP HALF HULL.   Very impressive authentic ship builder’s half block model of a full rigged ship.  This exceptional American half hull is constructed in the traditional manner using laminations of pine layered in “lifts.”  The hull form is constructed using 6 such lifts, exclusive of the applied keel and the cap rail on the bulwark.  What's unusual about this model are its particularly detailed embellishments not typically found on American hulls.  These include an applied stem and rudder.  The tip of the stem has a carved billethead below the bowsprit.  Running aft from the billet is a decoratively-carved trail board with a brace and a carved hawse pipe.  Above these are a splash shield on the foc’sle.  The stern has a classic arched transom with fitted cap rail.  The hull is attached by large screws to the original, solid one-piece mahogany backboard with beaded trim.  The hull itself measures 40 ½ inches long and 5 ½ inches high.  The backboard is 43 ½ inches long by 7 inches wide and is 1 ¼ inches thick.   A very manageable size for display.  The name “W.S. Ryland” is written in pencil on the back.  There are two recesses in the backboard for attaching hangers.  The brass hangers were not present at the time of photography, but will be provided to the buyer.  An exceptionally nice original half hull representing an American ship from the 1840’s.Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top



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2.44   HALF HULL   Genuine 19th century American shipbuilder’s half block model of a very large schooner.  This decorative, yet working half hull was actually used in the construction of the ship.  It is composed of 8 laminated layers of pine tightly fitted together.  The hull contour was expertly carved to the desired shape by the naval architect then the laminations were separated in order to take station points for constructing the actual ribs and sides of the ship in the builder’s plan loft.  Once completed the hull model was reassembled and mounted on a backboard for display in the yard office or that of the ship’s owner.  This example is mounted on its original rich mahogany backboard with scalloped trim.  The ship itself exhibits a very prominent raised foc’sle and a classic stern transom.  The deck is surrounded by the upper bulwark forming the ship’s rails.    This handsome model is 40 3/4 inches long and 4 ½ - 5 inches high.  Judging by its impressive length the hull represents a 4 or even 5-masted schooner.   The backboard measures 45 inches long by 7 ¾ inches high.  There are 2 insets on the backboard for hardware from which to hang and display the model.  These will be provided in brass. Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

Provenance: From the collection of an Admiralty Law lawyer in Baltimore Maryland. Many of the items in the collection date to the 1850's or earlier.



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2.42  CASED DIORMA.  Absolutely exquisite mid-19th century shadowbox depicting a brigantine under full sail plying a very realistic green putty sea.  This expertly-made model is without question one of the finest ever produced!   It features a realistically-carved wooden hull with black bulwark and haze gray decks.  The raised foc’sle has a capstan forward, an old fashioned kedge anchor on the cat head and a windlass.   The main deck has a deck house.  The raised poop deck is complete with after deck house, ship’s rail, and old fashion rolling block ship’s wheel.  The billowing sails are each properly rigged and individually marked to indicate sewn sail canvas.  The stem of the vessel bears a gilded acanthus billet leading to the natural wood bowsprit with dolphin striker.  The after mast has a beautifully-executed mast top with spreaders.  This authentic representation depicts the vessel at sea with white caps.  The background is a painterly depiction of a mountain flanked by lush forests under a beautiful azure sky with fluffy pink cumulus clouds.  Both sides of the diorama are equipped with mirrors which provide a very interesting bow-on and aft perspective of the vessel.   The entire presentation is housed in its original solid walnut Eastlake frame with fancy gilt liner, measuring 27 by 40 inches overall.  This diorama is unusually deep at 12 ¼ inches.  The front is protected by it original old wavy glass, the opening being 33 3/8 by 20 ½ inches.  The back is in its original old milk painted surface which, incredibly, is a single sold pine panel measuring 21 ¾ by 23 inches!  The overall condition of this presentation is absolutely spectacular.  It is truly one of the finest of its type ever made and certainly one of the best such dioramas available today, anywhere in the world!  It has been in our personal collection for over 30 years!   Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

Provenance:  Steve Crandell, The Captain’s Landing, Fisherman’s Wharf San Francisco, California, 1982.                       



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2.40  AMERICAN SHIP DIORAMA.   Wonderfully charming, 3rd quarter of the 19th century shadowbox of a full-rigged American clippership identified as the “Red Cloud.” in two places.  This exceptional folk art piece embodies all of the bells and whistles desired by collectors.  In addition to being identified, it is signed and dated on the back, “Made by Charles White, Weymouth, Mass. 1875.”  Rigged as a true clipper with six sails on each of her forward masts  and a spanker tri-sail at the bottom of her main, the sails are, top to bottom, Royals, Upper Topgallants, Lower Topgallants, Upper Topsails, Lower Topsails and Courses (Mainsails).  Standing rigging is in place.  From the top of the foremast flies the Union Jack.  The mizen carries the ship’s name flag “RC” and the main the house flag.  The American ensign flies from the spanker halyard aft.  The ship’s hull is realistically-carved from a solid block of wood with numerous details including the capstan and bitts on the focs’le, several deck houses, aft deck house with hatch and helmsman standing at the wheel, with railing and bitts on the poop.  The bow is adorned with a carved Indian warrior figurehead in elaborate headdress carrying a spear.  Above and aft is the nameboard reading “RED CLOUD” with another such board on the stern.  The bowsprit and dolphin striker are well formed and in place.  The sleek jib sails, trysails between masts and all square sails are of carved wood!  The ship is towed by an equally charming tugboat which belches black cotton smoke from its stack.  The tug captain is seen at the helm in the wheelhouse while a crewman attends the tow on the stern.  Many other delightful details defy description.  Approaching the ship on the far left is the pilot schooner under full sail, flying the “hotel” flag indicating pilot aboard.   The entire scene is cast on a choppy green putty sea with whitecaps.  Attesting to its age the backboard is formed of a single solid piece of pine, nicely painted with sky and clouds.  It is housed in its original Victorian wooden frame with ornate gilt liner under glass.   The glazed opening is 21 by 32 inches, with the entire presentation measuring 27 by 38 inches and 4 ½ inches deep.  Two stout eyehooks with copper wire are equipped on the back for hanging.  Excellent original condition throughout, showing good age, preservation and no want of repair.  A world class example.  2150 Special PackagingBack to Top

Red Cloud (1822-1910) was chief of the Oglala Lakota tribe in the Powder River region of northern Wyoming and southwestern Montana.  He was considered one of the most formidable opponents the U.S. Army faced in the 3rd quarter of the 1800’s.  The Treaty of Fort Laramie Wyoming, signed in 1868, led the way to reservation life for many of the western Indians.  However, in Lakota War of 1876-1877, prosecuted by Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, Red Cloud did not participate, true to his word in the treaty.  No doubt this act of honor and commitment engendered him in the hearts of many Easterners who eagerly followed the news of the Indian Wars coming from the Wild West.  At the time this diorama was made, Red Cloud had become legendary in the annals of Native American history.

Weymouth, Massachusetts is a small coastal town next to the shipbuilding port of Quincy, southeast of Boston.



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2.99 CASED MODEL. Charming, really nice sailor folk art model of the famous battleship U.S.S. TEXAS as prominently engraved on the large brass name plate and on both sides of the vessel's bow. This near scale, solid hull wooden model is entirely hand made from wood and brass with many intricate details not typically found on such models. For example all of the lifelines are made of drilled brass rods. The gun barrels are tapered and drilled brass. The scores of portholes depicted in the hull are drilled and rimmed with brass. All of the other fittings and the superstructure itself are either carved wood or hand-worked brass! This model is in its original battleship gray paint with black boot topping. The paint has alligatored with age and now exhibits a great old surface. The wooden decks in natural finish have also acquired a rich age patina. The ship itself measures 35 1/2 inches long by 14 inches high and 6 1/2 inches wide at the widest. It is mounted on its original solid mahogany display stand in original black paint with cloth bottom and measures 38 inches long by 9 inches wide. The stand is overlaid by the glazed oak case which measures 40 1/2 inches long by 16 1/2 inches high and 11 1/4 inches wide. Excellent overall condition. Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

The USS TEXAS (BB-35) was the second battleship to bear the state's name and the second New York class battleship to be built. Laid down on April 17, 1911 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. in Virginia, she was launched on May 18, 1912 and commissioned on March 12, 1914. She was one of only a few capital ships to serve in both World Wars.

Immediately after her commissioning TEXAS was dispatched by President Wilson to deal with a conflict in Mexico. Finally, in December, she left Mexican waters to join the Atlantic Fleet.

The use of unrestricted submarine warfare by the Central Powers in the Atlantic dragged America into the war in Europe in 1917. TEXAS served in the Grand Fleet by providing convoy escorts to troopships as well as helping the British to blockade the enemy in the North Sea.

Following overhaul in late 1918 TEXAS resumed duty with the Atlantic Fleet. On March 9, 1919 she became the first American ship to launch an airplane.

Early in 1925 TEXAS entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for "modernization" to replace her cage masts with a single tripod foremast and to upgrade her gunfire control system.

In the intervening years leading up to World War II TEXAS saw duty in the the Pacific and Atlantic theaters, serving as the flagship of the entire United States Navy Fleet.

Upon America's entry into World War II TEXAS saw her first combat in "Operation Torch" during the invasion of North Africa in 1942 by providing shore bombardment and naval gunfire support.

Throughout 1943 and into 1944 the veteran battleship carried out her familiar role as a convoy escort.

On the morning of June 6, 1944 TEXAS provided shore bombardment prior to the D-Day assault on the coast of Normandy, France.

On the morning of June 25 TEXAS, in company with the Battleship ARKANSAS, began shelling shore fortifications and batteries surrounding the German-held port of Cherbourg. In the exchange TEXAS lost her navigation bridge and the forward fire control tower with one man killed and several wounded.

After undergoing temporary repairs in Plymouth, England TEXAS again entered the fray, this time to engage shore batteries in the pre-landing assault of St. Tropez, France. That mission completed, she departed 2 days later for her home port of New York.

Upon arrival TEXAS underwent a major overhaul which included replacement of the barrels in her main batteries.
TEXAS departed New York in November 1944 bound for the Pacific theater via the Panama Canal. She arrived off of Iwo Jima on February 16, 1945 where she spent the next two weeks in a gunfire support role during that infamous battle.

Next she steamed into Philippine waters where she spent nearly 2 months providing gunfire support for various Allied landings. During that time she endured many Kamikaze attacks, recording one kill and three assists. TEXAS stayed in the Philippines until the Japanese surrender on August 15th. She received 5 battle stars for her World War II service.

TEXAS was decommissioned on April 28,1948 as she was turned over to the state of Texas as a permanent memorial. Today she remains in San Jacinto State Park, near Houston.

The fact that this model depicts TEXAS with her post-1925 tripod mast, but with her side-mounted 5 inches guns (removed prior to 1930) clearly indicates that the model dates to 1925, certainly no later than 1930!

 

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2.39  HALF HULL.  Most impressive, quite massive American shipbuilder’s half block model of a Down East packet ship from the 1840’s.  This handsome hull is constructed in the traditional manner using laminations known as “lifts" made of pine, with darker “defining lifts” of mahogany below the waterline.  In all there are an amazing 20 lifts!  These are held together using the early method of two tapered mortised wooden pegs driven in from the bottom of the hull.  Once sculpted to the Naval architect’s satisfaction, this assembly allowed removal of the individual lifts for contouring the ship’s ribs in the molding loft.  In addition to the lifts this model has the decorative features of a applied stem with billet, keel and rudderpost.  These appear to be made of mahogany with an old, dark variegated finish.  All of this is mounted to the large original backboard made from a single pine plank, with the edges finished in a simple raised molding.  The backboard is in its original black finish with slight alligatoring nicely showing its age.  The hull itself measures 62 ½ inches long from stem to stern and is a maximum of 12 inches thick.  The backboard is 68 ½ inches long by 14 ½ inches high.  Amazingly fine original condition.  Museum quality. Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

Provenance:  A Maine estate.



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Description: 2.32

2.32 FOLK ART MODEL.  Absolutely charming late 19th century American cased waterline folk art ship model.   This delightful little wooden model depicts a 2-masted schooner under full sail plying a carved wooden sea with full-rigged carved wooden sails!  The solid hull ship has a black boot topping and white bulwarks with bowsprit, masts and yards in natural wood.  The 3 jib sails are realistically portrayed with their attachment to the standing rigging, and the mains’l and mizzen are realistically attached with mast hoops!  Ratlines and hand-carved wooden blocks complete the rigging, which must surely have been done by a sailor intimately familiar with such details.  But that’s not all.  The deck detail is amazing!  Both old fashioned anchors with chain are depicted.  There are 2 deck houses with cut-out windows and open doors.  The helmsman is standing aft at the helm with the poop deck above.  Two lifeboats in their davits are rigged, and they even contain oars!  Yet the piece-de-resistance of this model is the depiction of no fewer than 14 crewmen going about their work on the planked deck!  The American flag flies atop the mizzen.  All surfaces of the model are colorful and bright in their original old finish.  This is because the model has been housed in its original wooden case with alligatored surfaces and old wavy glass on 5 sides.  The case measures 18 inches long by 9 inches wide and 14 inches tall.  The model itself is 14 ¼ inches long by 11 inches high.  Condition is outstanding and original in all respects.  In the proper folk art auction this model would zoom.  Price just reduced from 1995!   995  Special Packaging

Description: 2.32
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2.28


2.28   MINIATURE MUSEUM MODEL.  Genuine hand-made model of the early 20th century San Francisco Bay ferryboat “MENDOCINO” operated by the Western Pacific Railroad, as stenciled on both sides. This wonderfully detailed waterline model is constructed entirely of wood with hand-cut brass and metal fittings. It comes from the prestigious collection of the DeYoung Museum of San Francisco, California which was recently sold by that institution to generate funds for expansion and improvements of their facility. The model itself measures 6 1/4 inches long by 1 1/2 inches wide. With that, it exhibits superb detailing for a model of its size and type.  It is signed on the bottom in pencil, "NorthWestern Redwood Empire Ferry MENDOCINO." Excellent condition with all original old painted surfaces.  A great early San Francisco Bay offering!  SOLD

This exquisite little model is of the Northwestern Pacific's premier ferryboat MENDOCINO built by Bethlehem Steel Company, Union Yard, San Francisco in 1927. She had a steel hull with a length of 251 feet, breadth of 46 feet, 19 foot draft and displaced 2,467 tons.  Later in her career her ownership was transferred to the Southern Pacific Railroad and finally to Golden Gate Ferries, Ltd.  The identity of the modeler who constructed this fine ship model is unknown, but obviously he was in every sense a skilled professional!

Literature:  George E. Harlan, “San Francisco Bay Ferryboats,” 1967, Howell-North Books, Berkeley, California, page 178.

 

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2.37  IMPORTANT  EARLY SAILING SHIP HALF HULL with PROVENANCE.   Large and impressive builder’s half block model of the British bark identified as the “LAP WING.”  This genuine dockyard model is constructed in the traditional way using 8 pine “lifts” or layers, pegged together so that the sections could be individually traced then expanded to actual size in the molding loft of the shipyard.  The lovely sculpted hull with classic clipper bow and clipper stern is painted in the original colors of the actual ship: with a gold (copper sheathed) hull and black bulwark accentuated by a raised gold line at the boot topping.   A rarely-found plus in such examples is the beautifully-carved and gilded griffin figurehead and the fact that the vessel is identified on its quarterboard.  What’s more, adding to its authenticity, is the fact that there is a notch in the focs’le to accommodate the cat head.  This genuine builder’s half hull measures 48 inches long from stem to stern and 52 ¼ inches long inclusive of the bow sprit.  It is 9 inches high.  The ship is mounted on its original framed wooden backboard in original paint measuring 58 ½  inches long by 11 ½  inches high.   Excellent original condition with no restoration or modifications but showing good signs of age and wear. Price Request Special Packaging

Provenance:   This is an original builder's half hull model from the collection of The Port Mission of Baltimore City which was founded in 1885 "for purposes beneficial to seamen visiting the port of Baltimore City, Maryland."  In an accompanying letter from W. Austin Kenly, the director of the Mission, this information was provided:  “One of the nine organizing directors was George W. Corner of the firm James Corner & Sons, founded by his father in 1828. The firm owned and operated several clipper ships out of the Port of Baltimore which were employed in trade with Europe, South America, Australia, and ports of the United States.  Seven ship models (of which this was the oldest example) were recently sold at auction.  These had been continuously mounted on a wall in our building and it is the understanding of the current Mission directors, some of whom have been in association with the Mission dating back to the early 1930's,  that the models had been on that wall before 1900.  Additionally it is our understanding that they were models of some of the ships owned and operated by the shipping firm of James Corner & Sons and that they had been donated to The Mission by Mr. George W. Corner.”   Included with the original copy of Mr. Kenly's letter is a copy of the original charter of The Mission (dated 1885) and various articles and clippings relating to James Corner and his son George.  There is also an abstract from the 1871-1872 edition of Lloyd’s Register of Shipping showing the listing for LAPWING.

LAP WING, call letters JWNR, was an iron-hulled, 3- masted sailing bark of 728 tons built in 1870 by Ilif Shipbuilders in Sunderland, England for W.J.  Hodgetts, owner.  She had a length of 189 feet, a breadth of 31 feet and a displacement of 19 feet.  Her Homeport was Liverpool, England.  (“Record of American & Foreign Shipping,” American Shipmasters Association, New York, 1885 Edition).


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2.36

2.36 SHIP DIORAMA.  Absolutely delightful 19th century American sailor folk art diorama depicting a charming coastal scene with 3 sailing ships and a tugboat.   The foremost vessel is a 4-masted American bark identified on the starboard trail board and the mizzen pennant as the “DIRIGO.”  She is depicted under full billowing sail, all of which are made from carved wood!  She is outfitted with a carved wooden female figurehead, a capstan on the focs’le, anchor on the cat, 2 deck houses, a lifeboat in davits and even a skylight on the poop.  All lines are in tact rigged with carved wooden blocks.  Aft of the DIRIGO is a small 2-masted schooner under sail, also flying the American ensign.  Forward of the DIRIGO, passing to starboard, is a steam tug towing another American bark out to sea.  The tug billows dark (cotton) smoke as it pulls the bark with no sails into a head wind.  This smaller 3-masted bark is also very nicely executed with carved figurehead, good deck detail and all lines present.   Filling out the scene is a prominent lighthouse on a spit of land.  It towers over 3 adjacent buildings surrounded by a white fence and trees in the background.  Yet another American flag is depicted flying from a tall flagpole capped by pearl.  Ingeniously, a luminescent “light” made of mother-of-pearl adorns the lantern of the lighthouse.  All vessels are of carved wood and ply a painted putty sea.  The large background panel is made from a single piece of pine, nicely painted with subtle colors portraying the sky in a realistic manner.  Evidencing its age, the paint has become slightly alligatored with time.  The sides of the diorama are also pine affixed with old nails and wood screws.  The back is painted in its original dark blue/gray paint with evidence of old newspaper used to seal the joints.  The entire presentation is nicely framed in a period “Eastlake” style walnut frame with gold liner and retains it original old wavy glass.  It measures 24 ½ by 40 ½ inches overall and  18 ½ by 34 ½ inches sight.  The diorama is constructed on a slant, tapering from 7 inches thick at the bottom to 4 inches at the top.  A magnificently preserved example of this desirable form of sailor folk art.  Circa 1890.Request Price Special Packaging

The 4-masted Bark DIRIGO was homeported in the Pacific Northwest in the gold4en age of the lumber trade there, also coinciding with the Alaskan gold rush.  Further research could reveal additional information about the time and place of this scene.


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2.30

2.30  AMERICAN SCRIMSHAW MODEL.   Rare!  Genuine 3rd quarter of the 19th century sailor-made scrimshaw model of a 3-masted packet ship.  This well-rigged, highly detailed model is scrimshaw.  It is NOT a beef bone P.O.W. model!  Constructed of whalebone, whale ivory, baleen and rich tropical hardwood, the keel and bottom of the ship are dark brown wood.  The boot topping is a narrow strip of black baleen attached with tiny pins.  Above it, from the bulwark to the rail is planked whalebone attached with brass pins.  Deck fittings are carved of bone and whale ivory including the bowsprit, figurehead, catheads, foc’sle capstan, bilge pump, main deckhouse, cargo holds, ladders, aft deckhouse with bench, skylight, binnacle and steering gear box with brass helm. The detail is really quite amazing given the material from which it is made.  The masts and tops are all of carved whalebone as are the meticulously-fashioned bone blocks in the running rigging.  The spars are all of dark hardwood which provide a very pleasing contrasty effect.   The ratlines and stays on each mast are hand-tied and terminate in “bead” dead eyes along the bone-braced bulwarks.  This model is in superb original condition mounted on its original African mahogany stand.  It measures14 inches long overall by 10 inches tall and is 4 ¾ inches wide on the mainmast spar.  A superlative, museum-quality example of American whaleman scrimshaw art at its finest, proudly exhibiting its 140+ year age.   Request Price Special Packaging

A nearly identical model was sold from the very prestigious collection of Alice and Murray Braunfeld at Sotheby’s American Furniture and Folk Art sale conducted January 17, 2004 during “Americana Week” in New York.

Not available or for sale in California.  Shipped from Massachusetts.


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2.03 FAMOUS BATTLESHIP MODEL with MUSEUM PROVENANCE. Exhibition-quality model of the World War II dreadnought USS CALIFORNIA (BB-44). This sailor-built model is faithful to the original ship and was actually built on board during one of the most famous Naval battles in history, the Battle of the Surigao Straits on October 25, 1944! The large wooden stand bears the engraved Bakelite plaque reading: "MODEL OF THE USS CALIFORNIA Hull turrets and guns are of balsa wood, superstructures are of white pine, gun shields and platforms are of bristol board. Model took 10 months to complete. This model has been through the battle of Surigao Straights in the Philippines. It was there when Mac Arthur landed on Leyte Island in the Philippines. Built by B. M. Mickschl CH CARP. USN." The hull measures 38 inches long by 7 inches wide and the model stands 10 1/2 inches high overall. The stout wooden base measures 41 inches long by 8 3/4 inches wide. Now complete with a professionaly-made custom Plexiglass case. This model is in an incredible state of original preservation considering its construction, detail and age. A genuine piece of history! 2495 Special Packaging

A well-known Museum has commissioned us to sell this model, because it is not in keeping with the Museum's collection objectives. For purposes of public anonymity we will not publish the Museum's name here. However we will provide provenance to the successful buyer so that this valuable aspect of the model's history will not be lost.

The USS CALIFORNIA (BB- 44) was a Tennessee-class battleship launched on November 20, 1919 by Mare Island Navy Yard, California and was commissioned on August 10, 1921, as flagship of Pacific Fleet -- a duty she retained until 1941. She took part in the Presidential reviews of 1927, 1930, and 1934 and was modernized in 1929-1930.

On "The Day of Infamy," December 7, 1941, she was moored at the southernmost berth of "Battleship Row" in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. At 0805 a bomb exploded below decks in an ammunition magazine killing 50 men and setting her afire. A second bomb ruptured her bow plates. Despite valiant efforts to keep her afloat, CALIFORNIA settled into the mud with only her superstructure above the surface. When the action ended, 98 of her crew were lost and 61 wounded. On March 26, 1942 she was refloated and departed under her own power for Puget Sound Navy Yard for major reconstruction.

Restored to her original glory, CALIFORNIA sailed from Bremerton on January 31, 1944 in time to provide shore bombardment for the invasion of the Marianas Islands. During the bitter fight for Saipan in June, she was conducting shore bombardment when struck by an enemy shore battery killing one man and injuring nine. Following Saipan, her heavy guns helped blast the way during the assaults on Guam and Tinian.

In September 1944 CALIFORNIA prepared for the invasion of the Philippines. From October 17 through November 20 she played a key role in the Leyte operation, including participation in the last classic Naval battle ever fought between surface combatants, the Battle of Surigao Strait on October 20th. That momentous engagement resulted in the decimation of the Japanese fleet. On January 6, 1945 while providing shore bombardment at Lingayen Gulf she was hit by Kamikazes, killing 44 and wounding 155. Again she departed the front to undergo repairs Stateside.

Returning to action at Okinawa in June 1945, CALIFORNIA remained until July 21st. Two days later she joined Task Force 95 to cover minesweeping operations in the China Sea. After the surrender of Japan in early August, CALIFORNIA sailed via Singapore, Colombo, and Capetown, to Philadelphia, with a fitting arrival on December 7th. She was placed in reserve on August 7, 1946 and ultimately sold for scrap in 1959.

CALIFORNIA received seven battle stars for World War II service. Today, her bell rests in a memorial at Capital Park, Sacramento, a fitting tribute to a fine ship and her crew.

SPECIFICATIONS

Length overall: 624' 6"
Beam: 114'(1943)
Mean Draft: 30' 5"
Displacement: 40,950 tons (1943)
Speed: 20 knots (1943)
Main guns: 12 14"/50 cal. (Mk 11), 4 triple turrets
Secondary: 10 x 5"/51 cal. mounted in sponsons
16 x 5"/38 cal. in 8 twin turrets (1945)
56 x 40mm Bofors in fourteen quad mounts
6 x 50 cal. heavy machine guns
80 x 20mm Oerlikons
2 x 21" Torpedoes
Complement: 57 officers, 1026 men

 

PERSPECTIVE
STERN
AMIDSHIPS
BOW
PLAQUE

IN 1936
PEARL HARBOR
IN 1944

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2.67 DETAILED STEAM/SAIL SHIP MODEL. Really superb scratch-built and dated American model of a steam/sail brig from the 19th century. This period model is entirely hand made with precision detail and near scale rigging. The laminated wooden hull is beautifully sculpted and has a hollow interior with keel, tween deck, and lead ballast. The wooden deck in old mustard paint is scored to simulate planking. Details include bowsprit with dolphin striker and chain stays; billet head; both kedge anchors; rotating foc'sle capstan; fife rails; main deck hatch with accommodation ladder; removable deck house with funnel; steam whistle; "Charlie Noble"; 2 ventilators; 2 lifeboats; ship's bell; deck ladder; doors; windows with glass; aft house with door and glazed windows; functional helm; poop deck ladders; helm bell; poop deck skylight and realistic brass eagle sternboard! But there is much more! The deck house is signed on the bottom "Built 1876 to 1882." Using extreme care it may be safely removed to reveal an internal gearing system attached by a leather belt to an arbor running through the port side bulwark. Engaging the arbor with a clock winding key actually rotates the vessel's propeller! When the deck house is in place, the funnel is secured by 4 removable guy wires. As mentioned, the helm is functional and works as a real ship's steering station of the period. The helm is fitted with a wooden spindle attached to the steering gear. Turning the wheel to the left or right actuates the rudder in the appropriate direction! If the realism of this presentation were not enough, the entire model is mounted to a beautifully constructed dockyard cradle complete with hull supports making for a realistic stand. This exceptional model measures 40 1/2 inches long overall by 13 1/2 inches wide at the mains'l yard and 29 inches tall. Condition is nothing short of perfect. All surfaces retain their original old paint. The fine, realistic rigging appears to be original and is in a sound, outstanding state of preservation. A nicer folk art model of its type is not to be found! Request Price Special Packaging

DETAIL
STERN
HELM
BOW DETAIL
MECHANISM
ARBORHOLE
DOCKYARD
DETAIL
DATE

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2.19 DOCKYARD MODEL. Authentic mid-19th C. cased shipyard builder's half hull model of the 3-masted sailing ship VERBENA built by "Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland," England as identified in hand-painted lettering below the bow. This exceptional model exhibits all of the detail and quality expected of an "owner's model" as built by the shipyard that produced the actual ship. Fine, fancy original glazed hardwood case measuring 85 inches long, 17 1/2 inches high and 9 inches deep overall. The model itself measures 70 1/2 inches long from stern to bowsprit. Circa 1856. Immaculate condition throughout. Certainly worthy of the finest museum! Request Price Special Packaging

"Lloyd's Register of Shipping" Volume 1871 lists the VERBENA as a wooden hull bark of 260 feet in length, displacing 466 tons net. She was built in Sunderland in 1856 and operated by J. Whitfield of Sunderland.

In a publication entitled "Sunderland Builds Ships," 1989, Tyne and Wear Archive Service, City of Sunderland, England, William Pickersgill is identified as one of the prominent Wearside (River Wear) shipbuilding firms from 1847-1936.

STERN
MIDSHIPS
BOW

FOC'SLE
LIFEBOAT
BOW DETAIL

STATISTICS
SIGNATURE

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