West Sea Company

12. Other Nautical

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN



12.82   CREW WATCH DRAW MARKERS.  Rare!  Complete, mint set of 12 numbered brass ship's crew draw markers made by noted nautical makers "John E. Hand & Sons, Philadelphia" as embossed in gold on the blue leather snap case.  This World War II vintage set consists of 12 sequentially numbered brass bars 1 ½ inches long by 3/8 inches wide.  At the start of all maritime voyages, the crew's watch rotation  had to be determined.  A conflict-free way to accomplish this task was for the Chief Officer to lay 12 markers face down on the chart table, shuffle them like dominoes and let each crewman pull a marker.  This method of establishing the watch rotation was quick and without dispute.  New old stock.  A very obscure, little known historical marine relic!   149


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12.81  EARLY BOATSWAIN's  CALL.  Genuine 19th century boatswain's whistle of classic form complete with original sailor-macraméd lanyard.   Known as a "pipe" or a "call" this nickel-silver whistle has a barrel cast in high relief with an anchor surmounted by a crown on both sides.  The keel is highly embellished with floral designs and holds a ring for attachment to its lanyard.  The dyed cotton lanyard is of has a very high quality with numerous complex sailor macraméd knots including a monkey's fist and 4 Turk's heads.  The whistle is exactly 4 inches long and is 7/8 inches wide on the barrel.  The lanyard measures 17 inches long.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.  This call emits a loud, shrill tone when blown324

HISTORY of the BOATSWAIN'S CALL.

The Call has its beginnings in the days of the English Crusades, 1248 A.D., as a method of alerting troops to arms. Documented in 1485 A.D., the call was used as an honored badge of rank, then being worn by the Lord High Admiral of England.  Undoubtedly it was worn because it was used as a method of passing orders, and therefore signified authority.  When the Lord High Admiral, Sir Edward Howard, was killed in action off Brest in 1513 while commanding French Galleys, a "Whistle of Honour" was presented to him posthumously by the Queen of France.  From about that time onward the call was no longer used as a badge of rank, reverting to its original use as a method of passing orders only.  About 1671 the name Call was well established, lasting to the present day.  In the U.S. Navy the call is often referred to as a Boatswain's Pipe.


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12.80  BRASS SHIP's PHONE.  Second quarter 1900's internal ships telephone from a Swedish steamer.  This solid brass telephone weighs an amazing 21 pounds!  It is signed by the maker in high relief cast brass "Ericsson" and is marked on the back "Made In Sweden."  It has the early rotary dial type.  Charmingly, it rings on two brass bells at the bottom.  The Bakelite hand set is also marked "Ericsson" attached by springy phone cord (replaced).  Attesting to its shipboard use, the receiver hangs up and closes on the two spring-loaded nickel posts at the top.  This phone was professionally wired by the previous owner for in-home (analog) use.  The front hinges open to reveal the circuitry within, complete with wiring diagram.  The heavy cover hinges open and closed on a watertight rubber gasket.  There are 3 substantial cast brass mounting tags on the body, one at the top and two on the bottom for attachment to the bulkhead.  8 ½ inches wide by 10 ½ inches high and 3 ¼ inches thick.  The receiver is 9 ¼ inches wide.  Excellent condition.  895


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12.79  SHIP's TELEPHONE.  Extremely unusual, highly prized early ship's telephone made of wood!   This handsome device is the embodiment of cutting edge communication within a ship using electricity.  During the age of steam, signals within a ship were passed using cumbersome voice tubes or telegraphs.  Soon after the turn-of-the-century electricity came into widespread shipboard use, especially for lighting.  The introduction of telephone and radio aboard ship followed.  About the time of the famous RMS TITANIC, electrical communication had evolved to the point that a majority of ships had Marconi wireless, but most still relied on internal mechanical means as the engine telegraph and voice tube.  This early example bears the brass maker's plaque ""TYPE L63 TELE. MFG. CO. LONDON S.E. 21."  There are 4 other plaques reading "CALL, OFF, WHEELHOUSE and ENGINE ROOM."  The call mechanism features a push button while the wheelhouse and engine room portions have small lights.  A simple 3-way pointer switch indicates the function, with "OFF" at the middle.  The Bakelite receiver fits atop the phone in a brass cradle with spring-loaded Bakelite switch bar.  Telling of its age this telephone has an old fashioned braided cloth cord.  7 inches wide, 9 inches tall and 5 ½ inches deep.  The receiver is 9 inches wide and the cord is a yard long.  The back of the telephone swings open, held by a screw, to reveal the workings within.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.  This rare telephone is unique in our experience of handling ships relics for over 40 years!  1195


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12.78  BOATSWAIN's PIPE.  Authentic, World War II bosun's pipe made of sterling silver.  This classic call measures 5 ½ inches long and has a spherical ball (known as the "buoy") 7/8th inches in diameter.   The tube (known as the "gun") is beautifully tapered to the flared mouth piece.  The "keel" is marked "STERLING" just forward of the attachment ring (known as the "shackle").  MINT condition.  195

HISTORY of the BOATSWAIN'S CALL.

The Call has its beginnings in the days of the English Crusades, 1248 A.D., as a method of alerting troops to arms.  Documented in 1485 A.D., the call was used as an honored badge of rank, then being worn by the Lord High Admiral of England.  Undoubtedly it was worn because it was used as a method of passing orders, and therefore signified authority.  When the Lord High Admiral, Sir Edward Howard, was killed in action off Brest in 1513 while commanding French Galleys, a "Whistle of Honour" was presented to him posthumously by the Queen of France.  From about that time onward the call was no longer used as a badge of rank, reverting to its original use as a method of passing orders only.  About 1671 the name Call was well established, lasting to the present day.  In the U.S. Navy the call is often referred to as a "Boatswain's Pipe."


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12.77  BATTLESHIP MAINE COMMEMORATIVE.  Very scarce late 19th century utilitarian memento commemorating the sinking of the famed Battleship Maine in Havana Harbor, Cuba in early 1898 which sparked the Spanish-American War.  This clear crystal glass piece is cast in the form of the famous battleship in remarkable detail.  The lid forms the superstructure and the base is the repository.  Perfect for candy or a whatnot dish.  Both sides of the base are embossed "REMEMBER THE MAINE."  The entire presentation is in pristine original condition after 120+ years.  It measures 7 inches long by 3  inches wide and 3 ¾ inches high.  49

The explosion and sinking of the Battleship MAINE (ACR-1) in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898 with the loss of 260 American lives, led to America declaring war on Spain.  On April 23rd, after much Yellow Journalism and political wrangling, Congress declared that a state of war had existed between the U.S. and Spain since April 21, the day the U.S. began to blockade Cuba.  In the ensuing 10 weeks U.S. Naval and land forces thoroughly decimated the Spanish.  It was during this period that the vast majority of "Remember The Maine" articles of all types were offered to the American public in an effort to gain popular support for the war.

Subsequently, with resounding defeats in Cuba and the Philippines, Spain sued for peace.  Hostilities were halted on August 12, 1898, when a Protocol of Peace between the United States and Spain was signed in Washington.  The formal peace treaty was signed in Paris on December 10, 1898.  As a result of the war the United States gained all of Spain's colonies outside of Africa, including the Philippines, Guam and Puerto Rico, excepting Cuba which became a U.S. protectorate.  These gains prompted John Hay, America's Ambassador in Britain, to refer to it as "the splendid little war," in a letter to his friend Theodore Roosevelt.  Theodore Roosevelt and George Dewey benefited greatly from their participation in the war.  Both men gained immediate fame as national heroes.  Roosevelt's fame ultimately propelled him to the White House.

Years later it was determined the Battleship MAINE did not explode and sink due to hostile action, but as a result of its faulty boilers.


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12.76   CAPTAIN's  INKWELL.  Extremely scarce, genuine early 19th century ship captain's inkwell made of pewter with a hard fired porcelain insert.  Telling of its shipboard use, this writing implement has a very broad base measuring 9 inches in diameter.  This of course was to keep the precious ink from tipping over in a seaway aboard a rolling sailing ship.  The body of the well, measuring 4 ¾ inches wide, has 6 apertures for holding pen quills which surround the central porcelain well in the center.  A hinged folding lid covers the well but not the apertures.  The lid and the base are both scribed with double decorative concentric lines.  Complete with a later colorful quill pen.  We cannot overstate how rare this offering is!  It will make a treasured statement on the desk of that self-described sea captain in the family.  Guaranteed to be absolutely authentic and over 170 years old.  Found on the sea coast of New Hampshire.  Museum quality.  695


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12.73  MATE's ROPE GAUGE.  Very scarce and highly prized late 1800's or very early 1900's hand-held device used by the ship's cargo officer to determine the size and breaking strengths of line and cable used aboard his ship.  It is signed on the edge "I & D SMALLWOOD MAKERS B'HAM. ENGLAND."  This precision instrument is made of boxwood and brass, incised with a multitude of information about every conceivable type of connective lines, rope and wire in general sea cargo service.  They include "SHROUD TAR'D HEMP COILS 120 FAM (Fathom), LAID MANILLA COILS 1200 FAM, HAWSER TARED HEMP COILS 90 FAM, LAID MANILA COILS 90 FAM, WIRE ROPE, HEMP ROPE, CHAIN WT PER FAM EQL TO HEMP ROPE and WIRE."   On the reverse are indications for various weights and lengths of the material.  They read, "WIRE CIRCUMFERENCE, ROPE WT PER FAM, and EQL TO HEMP ROPE." This device is essentially a caliper which indicates diameter and circumferences of the objects measured and then provides a readout of safe working loads in tons.  A very accurate scientific instrument with a nautical use.  4 3/4 inches long by 2 inches wide and 1/8 inch thick.  It expands to provide a measurable reading of 8 inches.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.   A fine example. 295


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12.72  IVORY MARLINSPIKE/AWL.  Professionally-made punch/bodkin/marlinspike/awl with a steel working end, a silver collar and a lovely octagonally faceted ivory handle.  This working tool is signed "J.S. CHEVALIER" as stamped into the steel.  One can assume this instrument was made in 19th century France.  The contours of the instrument are continuous facets terminating in a very sharp point.  Overall length 5 ¼ inches.  Minor age checks in the ivory handle, otherwise perfect original condition showing good age.  195


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12.70  MATE's ROPE GAUGE.  Very scarce and highly prized late 1800's or very early 1900's hand-held device used by the ship's cargo officer to determine the size and breaking strengths of line and cable used aboard his ship.  It is signed on the edge "JOHN RABONE & SONS BIRMINGHAM."  This precision instrument is made of boxwood and brass, incised with a multitude of information about every conceivable type of connective lines, rope and wire in general sea cargo service.  They include "SHROUD TAR'D HEMP COILS, LAID MANILLA COILS, HAWSER TARED HEMP COILS9 of MB, CHAIN WT PER FAM (Fathom), EQL TO HEMP ROPE and WIRE."   On the reverse are indications for various weights and lengths of the material.  They read, "WIRE CIRCUMFERENCE, ROPE Wt PER FAM (Fathom), HEMP SIZE, and ROPE Wt PER FAM ((Fathom).  This device is essentially a caliper which indicates diameter and circumferences of the objects measured and then provides a readout of safe working loads in tons.  A very accurate scientific instrument with a nautical purpose.  4  5/8 inches long by 1 7/8 inches wide and 1/8 inch thick.  It expands to provide a measurable reading of 8 inches.  Outstanding original condition in all respects.   The best! 269


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12.05  ESKIMO KAYAK.  Very fine early 1900’s model of an Eskimo kayak, faithfully made in the traditional manner with seal skin over a wood frame connected by sinew and embellished with walrus tusk ivory components.  This detailed model features a single Eskimo hunter carved of wood, clad in coarsely-woven, hand-stitched cloth.  His handsome kayak is replete with two long walrus ivory-tipped harpoons and two wooden grappling tools.  There are numerous other small ivory fasteners on the top of the craft connected with sinew.  The bow and stern are further reinforced with ivory caps and runners attached with small wooden pins!  This near scale, realistic presentation measures 20 ½ inches long by 2 3/8 inches wide.  With the Eskimo caricature it stands 3 ¾ inches high.  Outstanding original condition, beautifully preserved.  795


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12.64  HAT BADGE.   Post World War I hat emblem worn by an engineering officer in the Soviet merchant fleet.  This handsome badge is constructed of finely cast brass in the form of an old fashioned anchor surrounded by split shot anchor chain.  These bear an oxidized back finish.  The front of the anchor is graced by a gilded propeller.  At the top of the anchor is the iconic hammer and sickle.  The back of the badge is imprinted “MD” referring the ship’s engineering division.  The hat badge is secured by a threaded silver disc which screws on tightly to a post protruding from the back of the propeller.  It measures 2 inches tall and 1 5/8 inches wide.   Excellent original condition.  A really decorative, well-made ship relic from a bygone era.  49


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12.63  PAPER WEIGHT.  Early 1900’s glass advertising paperweight with a very clever humorous marine and gambling association.  It reads, “Don’t  Gamble on Quality!  For Sure Bet, Call Eliot 6116 for Paints – Chemical – Engineering Supplies – Tank & Hold Cleaning Evaps, Fuel Oil heater 24 Hours a Day  MARINE SERVICE, INC. Seattle.”  Charmingly it contains 2 free moving die which roll as the paperweight is moved.  The thick clear glass measures 4 ½ by 2 ¼ inches and is 1 inches thick.  A old reflective mirror is on the bottom.  Outstanding original condition with no flaws, chips or scratches.  One of the most amusing such marine-relating items we have ever come across.   A great rarity for sure! 179


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12.62  CALENDAR TILE.  Highly collectible very early 1900’s porcelain advertising tile from 1913.  This lovely glazed tile indicates the dates of 1913 as offered by the “Jones, McDuffre & Straton Co.” of Boston.  Of great significance is the reverse which depicts a beautifully detailed view of the “Pier 46 Mystic Wharfs” showing the R. & M. R.R. Terminal Boston with the ships “HAMBURG AMERICAN LINE S.S. DEN OF CROMBIE, AMERICAN ORIENTAL, LINE S.S. JESSERIC, and HOLLAND AMERICA LINE S.S. AMSTELDYR.”  3 ¼ by 4 ¼ inches.  Absolutely perfect original condition.  Over 100 years old!  99


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12.61  SAILOR’S VALENTINE.  Scarce, early to mid-19th century English sailor’s valentine in the form of a glass rolling pin bearing the hand- painted endearment, “Though absent ever dear” with floral decorations.  This fine example is hand-blown cobalt blue glass with a hollow core, open at one end.  It measures 13 inches long by 2 ½ inches in diameter at the widest.  Outstanding, actually unbelievable good condition for a relic of this fragile nature well over 150 years old!  335

According to Alan Major in his nautical reference book, “Maritime Antiques,”  1981, Tantivy Press, London, “Such rolling pins were bought by seamen to take home as sailors’ valentines or seamen’s love tokens.  Some of them were hollow and could be filled with various commodities such as tea, eau de Cologne or spices.  When a stopper and the contents were removed the rolling pin would be hung by a cord on the cottage wall, where the inscriptions on them would remind the wife or sweetheart of the absent donor.  The seafaring community has always been superstitious, and it was traditionally thought that if a glass rolling pin fell from the wall and was shattered, then the loved one would be lost in a shipwreck or to another woman.”


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12.56  MOTOR LAUNCH BOOKENDS.  Absolutely charming matched pair of heavy bronze bookends beautifully cast in the form of a power boat plowing through wavy seas.  The cabin cruiser with open cockpit is depicted with the uniformed helmsman at the early-style vertical wheel.  The sleek craft creates a rolling wake with the bow rising above the waves as it races past a forest and lighthouse on the cliff above.  The casting details of every aspect of these quality bookends are exceptional -- statuary quality.  7 inches long by 4 inches wide and 3 ½ inches tall.  Each bookend weighs 3 pounds.  Circa 1930.  This pair will make a significant statement in a power boat enthusiast’s library!     695 /pr


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12.67 EARLY SHIP COMMEMORATIVE. Genuine, early 1900's framed photograph of the famous American steamer identified as the S.S. STEEL WORKER. which met a disasterous end in the service of the U.S. in World War II.  This handsome presentation consists of a period black and white photograph of the vessel that has been hand tinted.  It is mounted under glass within a turned redwood frame in the form of a ship's wheel.  The frame is decoratively hand-painted in a distinctive style, "S.S. STEEL WORKER" with a fouled anchor. The image measures 5 1/2 inches in diameter with the entire presentation being 12 inches across. Excellent original condition. 189

The S.S. STEEL WORKER, call sign KDBJ, was built by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. (a division of United States Steel) Kearney, New Jersey in 1920. She was of 5,860 gross tons, 3,450 net tons, had a length of 424 feet, a breadth of 56 feet and a draft of 26 1/2 feet. With a crew of 34, S.S. STEEL WORKER operated under the ownership of the Isthmian Steamship Company, home ported in New York.

STEEL WORKER acquired an early reputation as a "hell ship" due to the conditions and lack of staples provided to the crew. In fact two entire crews deserted her in between runs from new York to the Panama Canal. But she went on to have an illustrious career as a commercial cargo carrier. As the World War II broke out she came under the control of the U.S.Maritime Commission. Carrying foodstuffs for the beleagured Russians under assaulut by the Nazi invasion, STEEL WORKER was sunk by a German mine just 3,000 years from her destination of the port of Mishayamp, Murmansk on June 3, 1942.

The distinctive style and format of this presentation is quite recognizable and has come to our attention several times before. (See West Sea Co. items 5.13, 5.14, 5.74, 5.77 and 15.68). Although the authorship of these commemoratives is unknown, they apparently were produced by a cottage industry in the San Francisco Bay Area in the first half of the 1900's. They are quite collectible and are still very inexpensive for what they are -- decorative, real time ship mementoes made for the crew!


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12.49  VERY EARLY LIFERING COMMEMORATIVE.  Late 19th century ship memento commemorating the full-rigged sailing ship “TIMANDRA (of) GLASGOW” as beautifully painted at the top and bottom of the presentation.  It consists of an original old albumen photograph of a painting of the lovely ship underway at sea with full sail.  The house flag and the British ensign have been hand-touched in red.   The nicely executed painting shows great detail including the ship’s call flags flown below the “old duster,” her trailboard and billethead on the bow and her nameboard abaft the anchor on the foc’sl.   The image, measuring 6 inches in diameter, is protected under its original wavy glass.  It is encircled by a carved wooden frame in the form of an old fashioned lifering.  The British ensign is painted on the left and TIMANDRA’s house flag “R” is painted on the right.  The periphery of the ring is fitted with a grab rope held by 4 sections of blue denim.  Quite interestingly the reverse bears the framer’s advertisement, “From THE ADELAIDE PHOTO CO.  … Portrait and marine Art. 256 Pitt Street, Sydney.”  Obviously indicating this ship’s souvenir was made in Australia.  The lifering itself measures 9 ¾ inches across.  Excellent original condition showing good age on the front.  The backing is toned with some losses, but is in tact.  Overall it displays very well.  It is a rare, early relic of its genre.  Guaranteed to be over 120 years old!   SOLD


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12.41   COMMEMORATIVE SPOON.   Genuine turn-of-the-last century sterling silver spoon representing “CATALINA ISLD.”  as hand-engraved in the bowl.  Under the inscription is also a hand-engraved scene of Avalon Harbor with a large yacht, sailboats and the pier in the bay.  Surrounding the shoreline is the town of Avalon, hills and the historic Wrigley House on the right of the scene.  The stem of the spoon is ornately decorated with floral designs, as is the back.  At the junction of the bowl and stem is embossed “STERLING” and “PAT. 1901.”  Further, there are 3  fine raised maker’s hallmarks including an anchor.  The spoon measures 5 3/8 inches long overall and the bowl is 1 1/8 inches wide.  Flawless, absolutely perfect original condition.  All surfaces are bright, clean and as crisp as the day they were made over 110 years ago!  149



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12.40  BATTLESHIP MAINE COMMEMORATIVE.  Late 19th century sterling silver spoon with the bowl hand-engraved with a beautiful image of the famous “BATTLESHIP MAINE, Destroyed Feb. 15, 1898.”  The stem of the spoon is decorated with floral bouquets and is signed with lion hallmarks flanking a “W” marked “STERLING.”  5 inches long.  Perfect original condition.   195

The explosion and sinking of the Battleship MAINE in Havana Harbor, Cuba with the loss of 252 American sailors’ lives eventually led to the Spanish-American War.  The incident engendered great American patriotism and a wealth of period souvenirs from a generation of buttons to dishes.  This period example is one of the more elegant and costly, having been produced in very limited numbers by skilled artistans on a precious metal medium.


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12.19 P.O.W. SNUFF BOX. Absolutely charming late 18th or very early 19th century carved bone folk art snuff box depicting a handsome gentleman suitor courting a lovely maiden. This intricately constructed box is indicative of the incredible output of French prisoners in British prisons during the Napoleonic War era. It consists of an inner core of solid wood that has been hollowed out. Overlaying the wood is sheathing consisting of bovine bone attached with tiny brass pins. The box opens with fine hand-made brass hinges and is equipped with a tiny friction latch which allows it to close with a positive fit, assuring preservation of its precious contents. The front of the box is engraved with the initials "CT DW." It is both relief carved AND engraved with floral motifs and a "brick" pattern. It measures 3 1/2 inches long by 2 1/4 inches wide and 1 1/4 inches thick. This snuff box is in an incredible state of original preservation with no damage or repairs whatsoever. A superbly rare example of 200 year old P.O.W. work with a delightfully endearing subject! 1895


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12.37   SAILOR’s VALENTINE.   Early, very impressive, large double sailor’s shellwork valentine of the type produced in the Caribbean from the mid-1800’s onward.  This example dates to the earliest production of these sailors’ mementoes as evidenced by the fact that it has a key lock -- a feature found only on the oldest, higher quality surviving examples.  It is of classic diptych construction  having two octagons hinged in the center.  The cases are made of Spanish cedar having glazed covers of original old wavy glass protecting the fragile shells within.  The geometric patterns so-formed are remarkably complex and extremely colorful.  The left panel (also known as a “flat”) has a 6-side star with a central rosette.  In keeping with the fact that this sailor memento was  a souvenir for a loved one, the central theme of the right flat is a large heart encircled by 3 rosettes.  Each flat measures 13 ¾ inches across with a combined overall width of 27 3/8 inches.  Condition is absolutely outstanding, untouched, original.  As bright and vibrant as it was made over 150 years ago!   Museum-quality.  Price Request Special Packaging


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12.36  SIGNALS and ABBRVIATIONS.   Authentic British Admiralty broadside of chart quality dating from 1910 with printed revisions though 1947, entitled “EXPLANATION OF SIGNS and ABBREVIATIONS.  This detailed depiction undoubtedly adorned the chartroom bulkhead of one of Her Majesty’s ships.  It contains an amazing array of nautical information ranging from “General Abbreviations used on Admiralty charts, Quality of the Bottom, Conventional Signs (coastal topography),  Buoys and Beacons, Lights (with amendment), Tides and Tidal Streams, Fog Signals, Radio Stations, Wrecks” and much more.  Printed in black and red ink on heavy chart stock.  The reverse is marked, “5011 SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED ON BRITISH CHARTS.”  The bottom is marked “Crown Copyright.”  27 ¾ by 20 ¼ inches.  Good overall with minor condition issues consisting of thumb tack holes in the corners and a small tear, professionally repaired, on the bottom.  A great wall hanger with much interesting nautical information.  Worthy of framing.  Shipped rolled in a mailing tube unless otherwise requested.  99


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12.24  SLAVE TRADE PRINT.   Highly unusual old lithograph with rare subject matter of the early 19th century slave trade entitled “NAVIO NEGREIRO.”   This gripping depiction shows the “tween deck” of an old sailing ship literally littered with hapless Africans crammed in quarters during their passage to slavery.  Three white slaver crewmen carry out the body of a man who has succumbed to the congested conditions, while scores of his compatriots look on.  Some appear astonished, while others cry, yet most are totally indifferent – even smiling!  The central vignette is a muscular slave reaching up towards the main deck to receive some grievously-needed sustenance.  The print is signed lower left “Dess d’ap. nat par Rugendas,”  then in the center,  “Lith de Engelemann, rue du faub Montmarte, No.  6 á Paris” and “Deroy del” on the right.  This striking scene measures 6 by 8 inches sight and is matted under old wavy glass in its original simple gilded wooden frame 9 ¾ by 12 inches.  The back bears the original old framer’s label reading “CASA MIRANDA, Vidros E Papeis Ltda, Estampas – Aquarelas, MOLDURLAS, R. Evaristo Da Veiga 22… Papelaria.”  Untouched original condition.  Very scarce imagery in a bold presentation.   199

Interestingly, the framer, located at R. Evaritos Da Veiga, was in the heart of old town Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – one of the bastions of the active slave trade in the early 1800’s.

An Internet search using NAVIO NEGREIRO turns up several early images on the topic.  This particular scene appears to be the most prominent.


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