West Sea Company

Make an Offer & Specials

Here is a chance for YOU to set the price! We will consider any REASONABLE OFFER on the following select items.

If your offer is acceptable we will reply.

To make an offer use the Make Offer button.
Please Indicate the Item Number and the Amount in US Dollars of Your Offer.



13.70  SHIP’s WHEEL CLOCK.  Finest quality mid-century ship’s bell clock by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company as marked on the silvered brass dial “CHELSEA SHIP’S BELL.”  This handsome striking clock, known as the “Pilot,” has Arabic numerals and a minute chapter swept by blued steel spade hands.  The micrometer Slow/Fast adjustment is just below “10” and the innovative bell On/Off lever is located at the 7:30 position.  The silvered brass reflector ring is held in by the classic flared ship’s clock bezel which threads onto the solid brass case.  The case is encircled by the very decorative ship’s wheel motif of solid brass with factory-patinated statuary bronze rim and polished spokes.  3 ½ inch dial.  The case is 5 inches in diameter and 3 3/8  inches deep while the wheel measures 8 3/4 inches wide overall.  This clock is an excellent timekeeper and strikes the ship’s bell sequence properly with a rich, clear tone.  The matching case and movement numbers of XXXXXX* date it to 1973.  Complete with winding key.   Our list price $1295  Make Offer

The “Yacht Wheel” clock was first offered by Chelsea in 1906.  In 1928 it became known as the “Mariner” and in 1930 this size of Mariner was given its own identity as the “Pilot.”  Chelsea discontinued the model in 1984.

*  For the privacy and security of the  ultimate buyer the serial number is being withheld.

 


PERSPECTIVE
DETAIL
BACK





3.57  HIGHEST GRADE SEXTANT.   Mid-century German navigator’s sextant of absolutely the finest quality.  This precision instrument was manufactured by the prestigious “C. PLATH” company of Hamburg, Germany, as engraved on the large arc, along with the company’s famous trademark of a stick man with sextant and serial number.  This state-of-the-art instrument is made of solid brass in its original blackened finish.  The large scale is engraved in single degrees from -5 to 124.  The index arm is equipped has an endless tangent screw with pinch stop and micrometer read out which provides an accurate reading to 1 arc minute.  It is complete with extra large index and horizon mirrors, all 4 index and 3 horizon filters.  The large focusing telescope mounts on a detachable “shoe.”  The reverse is bears 2 “feet” and a substantial Bakelite handle.  The handle is also embossed with the maker’s name and trademark.  This pristine instrument fits neatly into its beautifully-constructed solid oak box of dove-tailed construction and all brass fittings, complete with natural bristle brush and mirror adjusting wrench.  The lid of the box retains the maker’s mark on a silver medallion and the original “Sextant Certificate“ of calibration dated “29. Aug. 1955.”  The index arm measures 9 ¼ inches long and the large arc is 9 ¼ inches wide.  The box is 12 inches square by 7 inches thick.  Plath sextants are by far and away the choice of modern mariners as a most dependable back-up to their electronics.  The entire presentation is in an absolutely remarkable state of original preservation.  It would not be an overstatement to say this sextant appears to be in factory mint condition, little if ever used!  Our list price $895. for $650


BOX
IN BOX
SEXTANT

REVERSE
DETAIL
MAKER

KEY ESCUTCHEON
CERTIFICATE

 



10.20  NAVY DIVING HELMET.   Rare, highly sought after, World War II vintage American Navy hard hat diving helmet made by the Miller-Dunn Company of Miami, Florida.  The embossed rectangular brass maker’s tag reads, “DIVINHOOD STYLE  3  – NAVY STANDARD –  U.S. and Foreign Patents, MILLER-DUNN CO.,  MIAMI, FLA.”  This shallow water helmet is Miller-Dunn’s final model, representing the culmination of their shallow water helmet output since the very early 1900’s.  It consists of a hand-formed bonnet of pure copper with brass fittings.   This impressive pre-SCUBA diving relic is in superb original condition.  The glass ports are original and retain their original litharge and red lead seals.  Both the original front and rear lead weights are present, complete with their original brass wing nuts and fasteners.  As configured this presentation weighs nearly 56 pounds!  25 inches tall by 12 ¾ inches wide at the shoulder and 13 ¼ inches front to back.  Without a doubt one of the finest classic American hard hat diving helmets available anywhere. Our list price $4995. Special Packaging  MAKE OFFER


RIGHT

LEFT
BACK

MAKER

 


13.15


13.15  U.S.  MARITIME COMMISSION SHIP’s CLOCK.  Authentic World War II vintage ship’s clock made for the U.S. Maritime Commission by the venerable Seth Thomas clock company.  The silvered brass dial is boldly marked “U.S. MARITIME COMMISSION” in the center, then “Made By Seth Thomas In U.S.A.” below the 6.  This finest quality ship’s clock is marked with large Arabic numerals swept by blackened spade hands and a large center sweep second hand.  A minute chapter ring on the periphery of the dial is marked from 5 to 60 in single second intervals.  This clock has a classic flared ship’s clock bezel which hinges open on the right secured with a thumb screw closing on the original cork gasket.  The black Bakelite case is marked on the back with the iconic “GE” (General Electric) logo.  The fully jeweled all brass movement is marked stamped the Seth Thomas logo within a diamond and is dated “8-44” (August 1944) indicating it was made during the peak of the Second World War. This clock is an good  time keeper and is in excellent cosmetic condition showing signs of actual use.  7 ¾ inches in diameter.    Our list price $549 Make Offer

The United States Maritime Commission was an agency of the Federal Government created by the Merchant Marine Act passed on June 29, 1936.  It replaced the United States Shipping Board (U.S.S.B.) which dated from World War I.  The Merchant Marine Act formulated a Long Range merchant shipbuilding effort to design and build five hundred modern cargo ships.  These were intended to replace the World War I era vessels which comprised the bulk of the United States Merchant Marine at the time.  The Maritime Commission was also tasked with administering a subsidy program to build and operate ships under the American flag.  Further it created the United States Maritime Service for training Merchant Marine officers to man the fleet.

In the late 1930's, several dozen merchant ships were built for the Commission under the original 500 shipbuilding program. Then in the late fall of 1940 the Emergency Shipbuilding program came into being, in order to support a lifeline to Great Britain and nationalize American shipbuilding in the event of war.

The first existing vessel undertaken by the Merchant Marine Act was the mighty SS AMERICA, owned by the United States Lines, which had operated in passenger service since 1940. When war appeared imminent, AMERICA was requisitioned by the U.S. Navy on June 1, 1941 and renamed USS WEST POINT for use as a troop carrier.

 From 1939 through the end of World War II the U.S. Maritime Commission funded and administered the largest, most successful merchant shipbuilding effort in history.  Thousands of ships, including Liberty ships, Victory ships, tankers and freighters were produced.  Many were converted to Navy auxiliaries, notably attack cargo ships, attack transports, escort aircraft carriers, and tankers which became fleet replenishment ships.  The Commission also was tasked with the construction of many hundreds of U.S. Navy ships including LST's, Tacoma-class frigates and troop transports.  By the end of the war, U.S. shipyards had built a total of 5,777 merchant and naval ships under Maritime Commission auspices.

Upon the cessation of hostilities in World War II,  the Emergency and Long Range shipbuilding programs were ended.  In 1946, the Merchant Ship Sales Act was passed to sell off the Post-War surplus of ships to commercial buyers.  Ships not sold under the Ship Sales Act were placed into one of eight National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) sites maintained on the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf coasts.

The U.S. Maritime Commission was officially disbanded on May 24, 1950.

13.15
13.15
13.15
PERSPECTIVE
DIAL
MOVEMENT

 



18.69  CONVOY STERN LIGHT.   Authentic World War II era merchant ship’s stern lamp as used when steaming in convoy under darken ship conditions.  This heavy duty ocean-going lantern is made of solid copper with brass fittings.  The lovely deep blue glass lens is curved, describing an arc of 10 points of the compass (112 ½ degrees).   It is mounted in its copper housing having a dome top and with brass handle and copper mounting brackets on each side.  The back of the lamp is equipped with a sliding copper panel which lifts up by means of a brass ring to reveal the interior.  All of fittings are attached with sturdy rivets.  The interior is fitted with a porcelain fixture which accommodates a standard 110-220 V incandescent bulb.  It is presently wired with a functional low wattage bulb and a 110 cord with in-line On/Off switch.  Although unmarked, the construction of this stern light appears to be English in origin and is entirely hand-made.  11 ½ inches tall by 9 inches wide and 6 ¼ inches deep.  Perfect original condition exhibiting a nice rich patina.  A nice, not too overwhelming size, displayable in most any setting.  Our list price $429.  Make Offer

The development of convoy steaming evolved during World War I “herding” vessels safely across the Atlantic to minimize the threat of the German wolf pack attacks on lone ships.  The technique was perfected in World War II in the days before radar.  The idea of the blue convoy light was that it could only be seen short distances – enough for the ships in convoy to keep station, but not far enough away to be detected by a submerged submarine.


SIDE
ILUMINATED

OPEN
BACK

 



9.56   MICROSCOPE.  “Society of the Arts” microscope as produced during the 4th quarter of the 19th century in Britain.  Quite often these microscopes were awarded to university students who graduated at the top of their class in the sciences.  This handsome example is all brass with a heavy black enameled iron base.  The main tube receiver is engraved “THOMPSON, 94 Manchester St., LIVERPOOL.”  The base is equipped with a very tight rack and pinion focusing mechanism and the screw-in optical tube has a separate fine focus.  This microscope comes with some period accessories, but it is not altogether complete.  It is housed in its original fine mahogany box with folding brass carrying handle, original skeleton lock and key, ivory-knobbed drawer containing numerous glass slides and ultra-thin glass specimen covers.  As shown the microscope measures 12 1/4 inches high closed.  The nice box measures 6 by 7 by 7 10 inches.  A good quality microscope from the 1880’s to be sold at a very reasonable price.   Our List Price $495   Make Offer

Gerard L’e Turner, “Collecting Microscopes,” 1981, Christie’s International Collectors Series, Mayflower Books, New York.  A similar instrument is illustrated on page 79.



BOX
IN BOX
PERSPECTIVE

STANDING
SIGNATURE

 



13.60 ADJUSTABLE MOUNTAIN BAROMETER.   Early 1900’s patented American aneroid barometer made by “Taylor, Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. and Toronto, Canada” as marked at the bottom of the white enameled dial.  This highest quality scientific instrument is calibrated in inches of mercury reading from 26 to 32, marked in 2/100ths increments increments.  The reading is indicated by a fine black steel needle overlaid by a brass set needle attached to a knurled knob used to mark the previous reading, thereby indicating any change.  The dial is marked with the standard weather indications “STORMY, RAIN CHANGE, FAIR and VERY DRY,” in between arrows marking “LOW and HIGH.”  The top is marked “PAT. AUG. 18-1914.”  This refers to the very innovative feature allowing the barometer to be set for a specific altitude.  A knurled dial on the reverse is marked “Rotate This Plate Until Arrow On Case Points To The Altitude Of Your Locality.”  The altitude scale ranges from 3500 to 7000 feet.   This clever mechanism rotates the movement (and hence the indicator needle) internally to compensate for the lower atmospheric pressure at altitude vs. sea level where standard barometers and calibrated.  The case is made of the superb quality solid rose brass and measures 5 1/4 inches in diameter by 2 ½ inches deep.   A pivoting suspension ring is fitted at the top for hanging.  Absolutely perfect condition in every respect.  Functional and accurate.  Our list price $395.  Make Offer


perspective
back

 


 


18.65 AMERICAN RUNNING LAMP.  Mid-century ship’s starboard running lamp of classic American design made by the venerable PERKO company as marked on the Bakelite electrical fixture and impressed on the top of the chimney.  This all brass lantern has a pure green polycarbonate lens backed by 2 silvered reflector panels on the interior.  The spring-loaded socket designed for 110V inserts into the bottom with a press-fit.  A paper label reads, “Use 15 Watt Bulb.”  This lamp is in like new, never used condition in its original bright brass lacquered finish.  12 ¼ inches tall exclusive of the suspension loop on the top and 7 ½ inches wide corner to corner.  Complete with original brass mounting bracket and screws!   Our list price $195.  for $150


BACK
PERKO

BOTTOM
COMPONENTS

 


 


13. 52   AMERICAN BAROMETER.  High quality, all brass precision barometer made by the Taylor Instrument Company as marked on the white enameled brass dial.  The bottom of the dial is marked “WEATHER BAROMETER Taylor, Rochester, N.Y.”  This top quality instrument is all brass with a convex glass crystal.  The dial is calibrated in inches of mercury from 26.5 inches to 31.5 inches in 2/100ths increments,   In addition it bears the classic indications, “RAIN, CHANGE, FAIR”   Readings are shown by the black steel indicator needle backed by a Victorian design on the dial.  A brass set needle with knurled knob is rove through the glass to monitor previous readings.  The instrument is contained in its all brass case with pivoting suspension loop for hanging and a center set feature for adjusting the reading on the back.  5 ½ inches in diameter and 2 ¾ inches thick.  6 inches tall with loop.  Excellent original condition, functional and accurate.  Our list price $195.  for $165.


perspective
back



13.47  MINIATURE BAROGRAPH.  Top quality mid-century recording barometer made by the West German precision instrument making company, Lufft of Stutgart. This high grade weather instrument is of all brass construction with a nickel finish to guard against corrosion in the harsh marine environment.  It has a 4-tier bellows system with a complex linkage which transfers the barometric pressure reading to a stylus scribing the revolving drum.   The reading is recorded on graph paper marked from 28.5 inches of mercury to 30.85 on the y axis and days of the week in two hours intervals on the x axis.  A pivoting keeper allows the pen trace to be held away form the drum when not in use.   To these ends an 8 day jeweled movement rotates the drum once a week.  A built-in winding key is provided in the top of the drum as well as a knurled knob for removing the drum to replace the chart paper.   A press-fit cover protects the internal clock and drum.   The entire mechanism is mounted atop a blackened aluminum bedplate which is further secured to an ebonized wooden base with four “feet.”  The bottom bears a paper label reading “Lufft, Stutgart.”  On top, a brass-framed glass cover fits neatly over the entire unit providing both protection and visual presentation.  This diminutive instrument measures only 8 ¼ inches long by 5 inches wide and 4 ½ inches high.  It is in excellent original condition and is fully functional.  The clock movement is strong and a good timekeeper.  Well over half a century old.  Later versions incorporated plastic parts.  This example is metal, glass and wood.   Complete with several unused sheets of recording paper marked with a fouled anchor and initials “LM.”  Already a bargain at  Our list price $395.  for $325.


 



18.47  SHIP’s GLOBE LANTERN.  Genuine, early 1900’s ship’s lamp known variously as a “hurricane globe lantern, watermelon lamp, or onion lamp.”  This English example is hand-made of solid brass with soldered seams reinforced by rivets.   The old glass globe exhibits bubbles and striations indicative of its early hand-blown manufacture.   This lantern is complete with its original oil font and burner which fits into the bottom of the lamp with a positive half twist.  To assist in this process a folding brass bale handle is attached to the bottom of the font, which doubles as a tie down when suspended.  The non-aspirated burner screws into the font with a threaded receptacle.  It is marked “WEDGE” and the wick advance knob is stamped “SHERWOOD BHAM” (Sherwoods, Birmingham).  The top of the lamp is fitted with a heat disbursing castellated chimney cap and the lamp is equipped with a stout wire bail handle for hanging.  This diminutive little veteran of the sea measures 10 ½ inches tall and 7 ½ inches in diameter.   Inclusive of the handle it measures 12 ¼ inches tall.  Excellent original condition evidencing actual use at sea but absolutely no abuse or distress.  The exterior has acquired a lovely statuary bronze patina consistent with age.  This is the real deal, guaranteed NOT to be a reproduction.  A neat little lantern!  Our list price $295   for $230.

 


13.26


13.26  EARLY SHIP’s BELL CLOCK.  Late 19th century American ship’s bell striking clock made by the venerable “SETH THOMAS” company as boldly inscribed on the silvered brass dial.  This classic ship’s clock has Arabic numerals swept by black spade hands and a minute chapter ring.  A small seconds bit is inset below the “12” which indicates single seconds marked in 10’s.   This seconds feature was generally omitted on bell clocks produced in the 20th century.  The Fast/Slow lever adjustment is just above the “12” and the dial is further marked “MADE IN U.S.A.” below the “6.”  As is typical of bell clocks, this example has two winding arbors, one for the time train and the other for the strike.  The handsome ship’s clock case has a flared, hinged bezel opening on the left and closing with a press fit on the right.  The all brass case retains its original nickel finish to protect against a marine environment, some of which shows brass.  For maximum resonance of the bell, a perforated screen is provided on the bottom of the case.   A mounting flange with three holes is providing for attaching the clock to the ship’s bulkhead.  The case measures 7 inches wide and 4 inches deep.   Excellent original cosmetic condition showing its 100+ years of age but no abuse.  This 2-day clock which actually runs 4 days, has just been professionally overhauled by our AWI (American Watchmakers Institute) certified technician and is in tip top running condition, striking the ship’s bell sequence properly with a loud, clear tone.  Complete with period winding key.    Our list price $595.    for $430


13.26
13.26
13.26
PERSPECTIVE
BOTTOM
BACK


 


3.06

3.06   CASED SEXTANT.   Particularly pristine World Ware II vintage English mariner’s sextant made by the highly esteemed instrument making firm of “Heath & Co. New Eltham, London. S.E.9.” as engraved on the large arc.  This high quality navigational instrument with classic “3 circle” cast bronze frame is in its original black crinkle finish measuring 9 ½ inches across the arc, swept by a 9 inch index arm.  The inlaid silver scale is divided up to 150°, effectively making this a “quintant.”  The left end of the arc is engraved “Made In England.”  The fine silver vernier scale allows a reading down to .2 arc minutes.   This sextant has a pinch clamp on the index arm and Heath’s patented “Endless Tangent Screw” fine adjustment feature identified by the small label reading “Semper Paratus” (Always Ready).  It is equipped with a pivoting magnifier for taking a reading.  Both index and horizon mirrors are present, as are full sets of index and horizon filters.  The back of the instrument is equipped with pillar “feet” and a large mahogany handle.  The threaded sight tube holder accepts the interchangeable telescope or peep tube.  Complete in its original machine-dovetailed mahogany box with innovative Bakelite top and bottom panels.  Brass hardware includes the functional skeleton lock with key, folding handle, hinges and two hook closures.  It bears the original card label of “The Hezzanith Instrument Works, London” certificate of examination indicating zero error and dated 16th June 1944.  The trade label of “John Bliss & Co., Nautical Instruments, New York City” is also affixed   Overall condition is outstanding.  The instrument itself is virtually mint, factory original.  The box is in excellent condition as well, noting holes drilled in the bottom panel, presumably for display mounting.  It measures 10 ½ by 11 by 5 inches.  Ex. Museum.  An exceptional example!  Our list price $695   for $550.


3.06
3.06
3.06
BOX
IN BOX
INSTRUMENT

   


10.86 MARK V BREASTPLATE. Very scarce, World War II vintage hard hat diver's breastplate made for the U.S. Navy by A. Schrader's Son as indicated on the oval cast brass nameplate affixed to the front. The entire tag reads:

UNITED STATES NAVY
DIVING HELMET
MARK V No XXXX*
A. SCHRADER'S SON
DIVISION OF SCOVILL MFG. CO. INC.
MOD No 1 AUG 1942
BROOKLYN. N.Y.

This genuine American hard hat relic is in excellent, "as last dived" condition and is complete with the leather O-ring which seats in the bonnet and the dumbbell lock channel with chain as pictured. Our list price $1500  for $1300.

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate purchaser, the serial number of this item is being withheld.

SIDE
BACK
BOTTOM


13.36 BOTTOM BELL CLOCK. Classic late 19th century American ship's bell clock manufactured by Seth Thomas of Thomaston, Connecticut. The uniquely handsome ship's clock is known as the "outside bell" or "bottom bell" and dates from the 1890's It has a silvered brass dial with bold black Roman numerals, blued steel spade hands, minute chapter ring and a seconds bit showing individual seconds below "XII." The dial is marked "Made In U.S.A." along the bottom. The Fast/Slow adjust lever is above the 12 o'clock position and the manual strike lever marked "Strike" is left of "IX." The glazed hinged bezel with reflector ring opens from the right with a tight press fit. The clock case is all brass in its original nickel finish. This clock is mounted to its original wooden backboard with brass hanging brackets top and bottom and retains a paper label reading, "ONE DAY * LEVER, _._ Seth Thomas, Thomaston, Conn., U.S.A. Manufacturer of Every Variety of One and Eight Day Weight and Spring mantel Clocks.", etc. The dial is 5 1/2 inches in diameter while the clock measures 11 inches high by 7 inches wide overall. The all brass movement is in excellent running condition and strikes the ship's bell sequence properly with a surprisingly loud clear tone. The dial is in near perfect original condition - rare for this type of clock. Our list price $995  for $850.

PERSPECTIVE
DIAL
BACK




SPECIAL 17.  CLIPPERSHIP TRADE CARD.   Old advertising hand bill of the type distributed on the wharfs by merchants during the gold rush era garnering business on their ships for passage and freight.  This unusually large, decorative example is printed in 3 colors on a stiff card measuring 5 3/8 by 7 inches.  It reads in part, “Geo. D. Sutton’s Clipper Line for San Francisco.  The World-Renowned A 1 Extreme Clipper “ERICSSON” Matthews, Master, at Pier 27, E.R., is completing her Cargo, and will be dispatched Suddenly…”  Generally good condition, showing its age.  Some minor foxing in the upper right hand quadrant and the upper right corner is slightly dog-eared.  595 now 195


back

Order Info

 



 


SPECIAL - 1.   COMMEMORATIVE CANDY DISH.  Late 19th century covered milk glass candy dish depicting Uncle Sam astride a battleship.  This classic bit of patriotic Americana was undoubtedly produced in 1898 when the frenzy over the sinking of the Battleship Maine resulted in the Spanish-American War.  Hundreds of different curios were produced in that historic year to elicit patriotic fervor in the American people.  This charming example features Uncle Sam with top hat and long tail coat atop the Battleship Maine as the cover.  The body of the dish is the hull of the ship having a patriotic American eagle on the bow with turret guns and portholes cast along the sides.  This authentic relic measures 6 ¾ inches long and stands 4 ¾ inches tall.  Remarkable original condition for such a potentially fragile item over 115 years old.  The only flaw is one small insignificant chip at the very bottom rear.  195 now 79



back
interior

Order Info

 


 


SPECIAL - 2.  INCLINOMETER.  Authentic, unusually large ship’s pilot house inclinometer made of heavy solid brass.  This pendulum-type inclinometer would have graced a very prominent position on an athwartships bulkhead in the pilot house of the ship.  It is calibrated in single degrees port and starboard from 0 at the center (even keel) to 40 degrees on either side.  The heavy brass pendulum bob is pivoted at the apex and swings freely providing a most accurate indication of the ship’s heel at the moment.  This very substantial ship’s instrument is solid brass and measures 13 ¼ inches high by 17 ¼ inches wide.  The instrument itself is at least 1/8th inches thick.  495 now 119



detail
inclined
back

Order Info

 


 


SPECIAL - 5.  NAUTICAL ADVERTISING THERMOMETER.  Early 1900’s dial thermometer housed in a wooden ship’s wheel frame.  This handsome yet functional presentation was made for the “Cummings Transfer And Fuel Co. of Albany, Oregon.”  The 3 digit phone number is a testament to its age!  It depicts a lovely square rigger under full sail in the middle encircled by the thermometer scale reading single degrees Fahrenheit from -20 to 120.  The dial is protected by a convex glass crystal with a gilt metallic rim.  The dial measures 5 ½ inches in diameter and the entire presentation is 10 inches wide from spoke to spoke.  A brass hanging bracket is equipped on the back.  The wooden ship’s wheel frame and 8 spokes are all turned of solid hardwood.   Excellent original condition and extremely accurate!   SOLD


back

 


 


SPECIAL - 6.   WHALING REFERENCE BOOK.  Alexander Starbuck, “History of the American Whale Fishery,” High quality 1989 reprint of the original version published in 1878.  779 pages, hard cloth cover with dust jacket.  Widely regarded as the “Bible” of the whaling industry in America, Mr. Starbuck’s thorough treatment of the subject with such painstaking detail  is all the more remarkable in this modern age of instant information.  He devotes 179 pages to a narrative history of whaling in America, from the early shore whaling in the colonies to the Golden Age of whaling during the mid-19th century.  Following the history is an amazingly detailed listing of every whaling voyage departing American shores in the period from 1778 through 1876!  Each entry contains the date of departure, port, vessel name, type, tonnage, captain, owner or agent, whaling ground, date of arrival, result of voyage ( sperm-oil, whale-oil, whalebone), and remarks.  It is followed by a “recorded summary of importation of oil and bone from 1804 to 1876.”  That is followed by a “Synopsis of importation by ports from 1804 to 1877.”  It is followed by the “Index of Voyages by Vessel Names” organized by home ports.  There is a short “General Index” followed by several pages of detailed line drawings of whales and whalecraft.  Excellent used condition showing care. SOLD


plate 1

plate 2

 


 


SPECIAL - 14.   ARTISIC PHOTOGRAPH.  Lovely, original old hand-tinted lithographed photo.  This stunning image is of the heavily laden 6-masted American schooner ADDIE M. LAWRENCE as pencil titled on the original mat lower left and signed by the artist “F. Thompson” in cursive script lower right.   The photograph was taken of the vessel under full billowing sail from a starboard bow perspective in placid seas.  The image measures 7 by 9 inches sight, with a plate mark impression 8 ¾ by 10 ¾ inches in the original cream-colored vellum mat with measures 13 by 16 inches overall.  It is protected in its original heavy paper folder.  Perfect original condition.  This presentation appears to have been undisturbed in conservation conditions for nearly100 years or more!   195 now 49 Special PackagingBack to Top

Frederick H. Thompson formed the Thompson Art Company in Portland, Maine in 1900.   Following the lead of the prolific artist and photographer Wallace Nutting, Thompson produced a wide variety of interior and exterior scenes consisting of hand-tinted photographs.  Frederick died a premature death in 1909 but the business was continued by his son, Frederick M. Thompson, who died in 1923.

According to Paul C. Morris in “American Sailing Coasters of The North Atlantic, 1979, Bonanza Books, New York, “The ten vessels that were laid down and launched as six-masters were truly tremendous in size.  The smallest in terms of both gross tonnage and length was the “Addie M. Lawrence” built by Percy and Small at Bath, Maine in 1902.  This vessel measured 2,807 gross tons, was 292.4 feet in length and was homeported in Portland, Maine.  She met her demise on July 12, 1917 when she stranded at Les Boeufs, France near the mouth of the Loire River, en route from Boston to St. Nazaire.


ship

Order Info

 


 


SPECIAL - 15.  LARGE GLOBE LANTERN.  Especially nice, ship’s globe lantern from the middle of the last century.  This all brass oil burning lamp is of Northern European manufacture exhibiting the finest quality materials and workmanship.  Also known in the vernacular as a “watermelon lamp” or “hurricane  lamp,” the clear glass globe is protected by 5 heavy brass struts riveted to the  lamp body.  The large oil font and burner insert into the bottom with a bayonet twist, aided by a folding bail handle on the bottom.  The circular wick and advance knob, together with the crystal glass chimney, were designed to produce a light output of the highest magnitude.  The chimney is castellated to efficiently disperse the resulting heat, and the top of the lamp is fitted with yet a second bail handle for hanging.  Attesting to its quality, this lamp has an inner heat shield made of copper – a base metal not subject to corrosion due to heat or the harsh marine environment in which it was intended to be used.  The castellated top is double insulated and can be removed from its press fit.  15 inches tall exclusive of the bail handle and 12 inches wide.  17 ½ inches tall overall.  Outstanding, virtually mint condition.  This lamp  is easily over one half century old!   695 now 249 Special PackagingBack to Top


CAUTION

font
chimney

Order Info

 


 


SPECIAL - 16.   2 NAUTICAL ANTIQUE REFERENCE BOOKS.

Marian Klamkin, “Marine Antiques,” 1975, Dodd Mead Company, New York.  Hard cloth cover with dust jacket, 233 pages exclusive of index.   Profusely illustrated in black and white with a center section containing color plates.   Published in 1975, this book is the first of many to subsequently be written on the topic.  It is surprisingly thorough, dealing with the topics of “Logs and Journals, Instruments, Figureheads and other carvings, China Trade, Clipper Ships, Scrimshaw, Ship Models, Commemoratives, Furniture, Lighting, Seaport Souvenirs, Naval Ceramics, Decorative Arts, Steamship Relics and Yachting.”  There are also two very informative chapters on “Care and Repair of Marine Antiques” and “Fakes, Reproductions and Recently Made Collectibles.”  This is followed by two appendices listing “Maritime Museums of the World” and “Ship Restorations and Replicas.”  In short, this book has it all! 

Jacqueline L. Kranz, "American Nautical Art and Antiques," 1975, Crown Publishers, New York, 241 pages, hard cover with dust jacket.  This is one of the best early books on the topic of nautical antiques, written especially with the American collector in mind.  Ms. Kranz effectively and thoroughly covers the entire gamut of nautical antique collectibles from hardware to ships’ carvings and scrimshaw to fine art, with everything in between!  This book is profusely illustrated with black and white photographs drawn from a wide range of notable public and private collections at the time.  A center section contains color plates.   Unquestionably a foundation reference for any nautical antique library.  SOLD

 

 

Back to Top

^ BACK TO TOP